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I get asked a lot about what is the best new saw to buy on a budget.  My answer always is, don't.  Go find an older, belt driven Craftsman 10 inch saw and rebuild it.  They are as common as a rusty nail and not much more money.  I think people avoid the prospect because they are seduced by the 'features' of a modern entry level direct drive saw.  To show that it is neither difficult or expensive I tracked down a frozen basket case of a Sears saw and brought it back up to fighting form.  To buy it's equal new would be $400 and up.  Slap an aftermarket fence on it and now you are talking about a $600 saw.  When you look at it that way the elbow grease seems very cheap. 
<p>I just inherited a 10 inch Craftsman table saw (#133.299040). Everything works great on it. The only thing I don't have for it is the rip fence assy. I have looked everywhere for one, but no one sells it or makes it anymore. Does anyone know if there is another rip fence out there that is compatiable with this table saw?</p>
<p><a href="http://www.twistedknotwoodshop.com/PDF%20Files/tsquarefence.pdf" rel="nofollow">http://www.twistedknotwoodshop.com/PDF%20Files/tsq...</a></p><p>this is a link to plans to make a really good fence for around $75usd </p>
There are several options and none of them are bad because the factory fence is one of the weakest features of the saw. I have a Bessemer saw fence on my General and it could be bolted onto your saw. Someone on one of the rebuild videos put another unit on their saw and said it worked great. I wish I could tell you which video but I can't from work. They added a link to their review of the fence so you could get a good look.<br><br>Ken
do u know what the model number or part number or exact name for the biesemeyer rip fence assembly u have the will work for my saw?
<p>(same thread) 2 of which are cast iron, and though old, someone could put to good use. Any ideas?</p>
<p>Recently purchased Craftsman cabinet saw(top of line $600, with Bessemeyer fence!) when they were closing stores, and gave my perfectly good 113 to my son-in-law, although a tune up might be in order. So now I'm down to 5 craftsman table saws and a readial arm</p>
NelsonStudios... i did almost the same thing to a walker-turner 10'&quot; closed-base cabinet saw, in the dark, during an ice storm in coastal maine, driving home with it for about 100 miles north. it was painted high gloss grey enamel and. stenciled u.s.navy. with a 10&quot; blade and no belt (cause there was no motor), when spun by hand -- it took five minutes (probably more like two) to come to a stop! <br> so i left the arbor alone. turned it upside down and vacuumed it, brass brushed and mineral spirited it, then checked it over every way i knew how (pretty much what you did). oh, and then i sprayed it high gloss white.<br><p>got a Firefox fence and a good sealed 2hp motor. had a motor bracket made (i have to crank the blade all the way down to get maximum tilt). so i put $445 into a <strong>$75</strong> saw. end of story.</p><p> best darn saw i ever used. </p>
a buddy just gave me this same saw! got a xr2424 fence too. rebuilding it is fun so far. bought new pulleys for serpentine setup and wondering if I need stop collars for bevel screw adjustments. great write-up thanks !
Wow. You did an amazing job. Thank you for the inspiration to not buy a plastic POS saw from Drome Heapo. I really liked drobertson's pound puppy comment. And I especially appreciated your white paint idea for the underside. Smart. Your patience with your son is admirable. Great work.
HA!!! That is my saw. I went through the exact same process and it is a great saw now. Mine had fairly extensive rust on the top that I removed with Naval Jelly. I then seasoned the top with a blowtorch and some beeswax. <br> <br>Mine is getting to the point I need to rebuild the motor mount and that wont be fun, but it has been serving me well for years now. <br> <br>This whole process kinda feels like adopting a dog from the pound. Give it a little TLC and you have a great friend for years.
Nice step by step series of videos. I have two of the 113 series by Craftsman. Both need a major overhaul. These videos are most helpful in that endeavor. <br>Once completed I intend to bolt them together with a cast spacer &amp; cast wings outboard. <br>One set up for zero clearance &amp; the other for the dado work. <br>It's going to be a monster!! <br>
Not going to lie, that turns me on a little.
When you're ready to take it to the next level I wrote a couple articles on this site about some table saw mods I did<br> <br> <a href="https://www.instructables.com/id/Homebrew-Magnetic-Motor-Starter/" rel="nofollow">https://www.instructables.com/id/Homebrew-Magnetic-Motor-Starter/</a><br> <br> <a href="https://www.instructables.com/id/Homemade-Table-Saw-Rip-Fence-Build/" rel="nofollow">https://www.instructables.com/id/Homemade-Table-Saw-Rip-Fence-Build/</a><br> <br> I think they make a Craftsman table saw much nicer. Oh, and make an out feed table too. Out feed tables are a must for table saws. I never put up an article about making one of those because the possibilities are endless. I'm on my second out feed table already.
Great! This helped motivate me to do some intense maintenance on mine, which needed it quite badly. Your guidance was more than just a bit helpful. <br> <br>The casual input from your shop supervisor was entertaining, as well. Cool kid.
I have the same saw that needs some loving! Thanks!

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Bio: I am a teacher who enjoys environmentally responsible woodworking. Most evenings will find me in the shop working with my three year old son Shay ... More »
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