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There are plenty of table saw sled designs, here and elsewhere, on the Internet. A sled is an excellent addition to your table saw, and is usually intended to make precise 90 degree cuts. But occasionally you need to make a precise angled cut, as is required if you are doing segmented wood turning on a lathe. This Instructable shows you how to make a sled to make specific angled cuts on your table saw, more precise than anything you can buy for US$300.

Layout drawings in Imperial units are provided in the steps; layout drawings in Metric units included in step 7.




































Step 1: What do you need?

The sled will be made from 3/4" MDF. 

You will need a precise measuring rule, a good framing square, a drafting triangle and a sharp pencil. A magnifying glass will be a big help also.
















<p>DIY at it's Best :) One of these days I'm going to have to make somthing like this for my band saw. Great Job !</p>
<p>You sure could make one for your band saw as long as it has a miter slot (likely).</p><p>Now I'm glad I included metric dimensions.</p>
<p>Thanks for the reply!</p><p>Unfortunately, I have a Cheep band saw (brand specific accessories and a 62&quot; blade over a 60&quot; blade *frowns) It's this kind of situation that makes me want to make my own equipment :D </p><p>It's just going to take some &quot;Creativity&quot; :)</p>
<p>(Smile) &quot;the 3:4:5 triangle principle&quot;</p><p>'(Right) Triangle principle,' right? (SMILE)</p><p>Pythagorean Theorem, right? 'A' Square + 'B' Square = 'C' Square thus 9+16=25 and 'C' = 5</p>
<p>Gee, I posted this in the wrong place the first time ...</p><p>Thanks Charles - </p><p>Glad you are smiling. </p><p>Yes, Pythagorean Theorem, I had that in school several times (the theorem), but never really thought of the practical applications until I worked in construction and saw carpenters and pipefitters use 3:4:5 triangles to lay out square corners. They would have run me off the project had I started to talk &quot;theorem&quot; or &quot;Pythagoras&quot;.</p><p>April 2014 was Math Awareness Month (really).</p>
<p>Looks great! Nice work on this...</p>
<p>Thanks; I made a test ring of 10 segments and can't see daylight between any of them.</p><p>But when I first made the ring, I brought it in to show my wife. I assembled the ring (with her watching), and it was terrible, big gaps. Then I realized I had left one segment in the shop, I had a ring of 9 segments!</p>
<p>LOL. The missing link! Its a great feeling when things come out perfect. </p>
<p>Good work, Bill. I made one similar for my new cutting table. But my table has not sled slots, I use the outer edges. </p><p>I marked the angles I use on the table, but anyway always I need to do some tries and adjustments until to get the desired angle. To achieve this, I provided a micro-adjustment screw to the sled. </p><p>---------------------------------------</p><p>Buen trabajo, Bill. Hice uno similar para mi nueva mesa de corte. Pero mi mesa no tiene ranuras de trineo, yo uso los bordes exteriores. <br><br>Marqu&eacute; los &aacute;ngulos que uso en la mesa, pero de todos modos siempre tengo que hacer algunos intentos y ajustes hasta obtener el &aacute;ngulo deseado. Para lograr este objetivo, he proporcionado un tornillo de micro-ajuste al trineo.</p>
<p>Gracias Osvaldo. </p><p>Siempre tenemos que hacer algunos ajustes. </p><p>Tengo que hacer constantemente los ajustes en todo lo que hago. </p><p>Y no s&oacute;lo en el taller.</p><p>----------------</p><p>I have to constantly make adjustments in all I do.</p><p>And not only in the workshop. </p>
<p>HAHAHA!</p>
<p>Thanks Charles - </p><p>Glad you are smiling. </p><p>Yes, Pythagorean Theorem, I had that in school several times (the theorem), but never really thought of the practical applications until I worked in construction and saw carpenters and pipefitters use 3:4:5 triangles to lay out square corners. They would have run me off the project had I started to talk &quot;theorem&quot; or &quot;Pythagoras&quot;.</p><p>April 2014 is Math Awareness Month (really).</p>
Nice job, I like the way the depth stop doubles as a chip break to reduce splintering on the out board side
<p>Thanks, Longwinters.</p><p>Added the length stop after making the sled itself; there also may be some safety advantages to it. When cutting really small pieces, they remain on the board and can me moved with the eraser end of a pencil.</p>
<p>Thanks for your post. It was very well written and will benefit a lot of woodworkers.</p><p>I noticed in your figures you listed 12.5 degrees for an 8 sided segmented ring but you listed 22.5 degrees on the angle. Just a typo I know. I just started doing segmented work and staves. I will give your sled a try. I prefer to have one sled to handle ALL of the different angles. Right now I have 12 sided, 16 sided (11.25 degrees) and 36 segments (5 degrees)</p>
<p>Thanks for your comments! I know you read this Instructable well, you found my embarrassing error, which I will correct.</p>

About This Instructable

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Bio: I'm a retired mechanical engineer, woodworker, boater, and inventor. Now I'm getting into wood turning, and have found that all my wood projects ... More »
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