loading

If you have been on the look out for a project that combines, RGB LED's, a motor, a microcontroller and a ridiculous amount of hot melt glue, then you have certainly come to the right place.

Allow me to introduce the 'One Chip' Spinning RGB POV Display


This project allows you to create (with minimal components) a fantastic customizable display capable of displaying graphics, animations and text. You can scroll your graphics from top to bottom or use it as a scrolling message display, scrolling from right to left.

The project uses just one chip, eight RGB LED's and a handful of other components to paint animations in 'mid-air!' Plus, together with the included graphic conversion software (download link in step 2) you can easily create your own animations because the software creates all the code for you.

So please, read on and enjoy!

Step 1: Get Your Required Parts and Tools.


Before we set out on this venture, you will need both the components and tools.

Parts List:
1x PIC 18f4680 microcontroller
1 x 40 pin IC socket (optional - to house the microcontroller)
8 x Common cathode RGB LED's
24 x 100 ohm resistors (any wattage)
1 x 0.1 uF capacitor (optional)
2 x 100 uF capacitors
1 x 7805 (5 Volt Regulator)
2 x 10k ohm resistors
1 x hall effect sensor / hall effect switch
1 x 5 pin header (to plug in the pickit2 programmer)
1 x small rare earth magnet (to be used with the sensor)
1 x screw in type mains wiring terminator (See last photo - you get these from a hardware store)
1 x 12v motor
1 x motor (any motor that you can destroy for parts - I.E. the graphite brushes)
1 x 12v powersupply (for the motor)
1 x 7.5 volt power supply (for the POV display - can be upto about 18v)
1 x (5.5cm x 5.5cm blank pcb - aka blank copper clad) - this will be used to transfer power to the display
Holt Melt Glue Sticks
Solder
Veroboard / experimenters board
Thin enamel wire (see pic)
Standard single core wire (Like they use in network cable)

Tools:
- Soldering Iron
- Screw Driver
- hot melt glue gun
- Stanley knife
- side cutters
- pliers
- pickit2 programmer
- desoldering tool (solder sucker or solder braid - just in case!)
- computer running windows
- swordfish basic compiler (this is a free download - it compiles the code for the microcontroller)
- POV Image Converter (Software that I have made, download link is included in the instructable)

Now that you have all of that, let's get into the construction.

Step 2: Downloads


First and foremost, you will want to download the schematic so that you are not building this blindly, and perhaps you may want to experiment with the conversion software also. All these downloads are provided here:

Please read the readme.txt file for instructions on how to install the software.

Click this link to download the schematic:
http://www.bradsprojects.com/forum/download/file.php?id=297

Click this link to download the scroll down conversion software:
http://www.bradsprojects.com/forum/download/file.php?id=294

Click this link to download the scroll left conversion software:
http://www.bradsprojects.com/forum/download/file.php?id=290

Click this link to download swordfish basic (free version):
http://www.sfcompiler.co.uk/downloads/SwordfishSE.exe



Step 3: Let Construction Commence!

Now the beauty about this project is that you don't have to make it exactly how I have made it.

my original intention was just for me to see how small a board I could fit this project onto. But as you will see, there is plenty of space to work with when we attach the main arm that connects the display to the motor. So by all means, have a look at my design - but there are certainly other ways (simpler ways) of achieving the desired outcome.

I have cut my board so that I have 26 holes by 10 holes.

Step 4: Solder in the LED's and Cut Some Tracks


I have used surface mount LED's just to see how they would go (I have previously used through hole LED's in a past project)

Solder the Red, Green and Blue connections to the board.

The three connections on the top are the cathodes. (this may differ for your LED's - give them a quick check with your multimeter to verify)

You will also notice I have cut a line through the tracks connected to the LED's. This is so we can solder in some series resistors to limit each LED's current.

IMPORTANT NOTE: You need to make sure that the bottom LED is connected as your least significant LED. I.E. this led will connect to PORTA pin 0, PORTB pin 0 and PORT D pin 0. You then work your way up from there. Follow the schematic and you will be fine = )

Step 5: Solder in Your Resistors.

I have also used surface mount resistors to keep my project small, you may very well want to use through hole to make things a little easier.

The resistors solder in over the tracks that you have just cut.

Step 6: Cut Some More Tracks and Solder in a Ground Wire.


Now that the resistors are in place, you will want to cut another line of tracks on the other side of these resistors, getting them ready to solder to the microcontroller. - see the first photo

Once done, get a length of uninsulated wire and solder it along the length of the LED cathodes. then solder it to the veroboard (this will be our ground connection) - see second photo

Step 7: Time for a Quick Test.


Progressive tests are always a good thing, so let's do one.

Grab a 5 volt power supply and solder your negative end to our ground connection. then with the positive side, connect it to each resistor one at a time - you should have each LED light up with the respective color as you work your way through all 24 connections.

It's nice to pick up on faults before we get to carried away!

Step 8: Install the Microcontroller, Socket and Cut Some More Tracks.


Now it is time to solder in the socket which will house the microcontroller. Or if you wish, just solder the microcontroller straight in (if it is to be a permanent arrangement).

Then you will need to cut a line of tracks so that we do not short each end of the microcontroller together. - see the last photo.

Step 9: Install the Remaining Components.


Now it's time to solder in the regulator, filter capacitors, the header, the two 10k resistors and the hall effect sensor.

The two 10k resistors are not shown in this photo, they are soldered in underneath (check schematic for details)

NOTE: the header that I have used is a female header only due to the fact that I have changed my pickit2 around so that it has male headers (makes it easy to plug into breadboard)

The pickit2 originally comes with a female header, so you will want to solder in male headers to the project so that you can connect up your pickit2.

Step 10: Complete the Wiring.

Now it is time for you to study the schematic and solder it all together. There is no way that I am going to take you through this wire by wire!

Even though it looks messy, you are just doing this wire by wire so it is not too hard a task - just study the schematic! Again, here is the download link:

http://www.bradsprojects.com/forum/download/file.php?id=297

I will however tell you that the thin enamel wire is so handy for this exact task. It would be next to impossible to do this with any other sort of wire.

The thin enamel wire has a very thin enamel insulation layer which can be melted off using a blob of solder. You will want to cut yourself a few dozen lengths of this enamel wire, use your soldering iron and solder to form a blob and then put the tips of the wire into the blob for a few seconds until the enamel has been melted off. (you will know that it is off because the solder will actually stick to the wire)

Hopefully you can see in the last two photos that in one of them, the wires have not yet been touched. The second photo shows that the tips of the wire have been melted off and the solder has bonded to it. These wires are now ready to be soldered to your veroboard.

You will then need to do the same procedure for the other end of the wires to complete your circuit connections.

These wires are fine for everything EXCEPT your main GROUND and VCC connections. These wires are too thin to handle the current requirements of the whole board, but they are fine to handle the current required by any one LED.


Step 11: Cut the Main Arm Assembly and Slot Into the Display Board.

Now that you have the hard part out of the way. You will want to cut some more veroboard to size.

This part will hold the display electronics to the motor.

Cut your veroboard to 66 holes x 16 holes. Then cut a slot in the middle up one end and slot it into the display board inbetween then microcontroller and the regulator. Solder the board to the spare track to hold it in place.


Step 12: Start Assembling the Power Transfer Board.

This is quite an important step, because without it - you'd have no power going to your display!

You will need your screw in wire terminator, 5.5cm x 5.5cm and blank PCB.

Firstly, mark out the center of your board.

Then draw a circle around it using either a compass or small round object (I used a cr2032 battery)

Then, scratch out the drawn circle to create two separate areas (the middle area is for our ground power connection and the outer area is for Vcc)

once done, you will need to solder on your wire terminator (this is how we connect the display to the motor shaft)

And finally, drill out a small hole somewhere in the center pcb area (so that a wire can be soldered to it coming through from the other side.)

Step 13: Connect the Power Board to the Main Assembly.


Now that you have your power transfer board made, you need to attach it to your main assembly - so bring on the hot melt glue gun!

Firstly though, get two of your solid core wires and solder one from your ground connection of your display board through the hole in the power board and solder to the center of the power board.

Then, solder another wire to the outer edge of the power board and the other end of the wire to the 7805 regulator input.

Now align the power transfer board to the center of your main board and use your hot melt glue gun to hold it in place. (careful - it's hot...)

Step 14: Balance the Board.

You may have realized that the board (at this point) will be terribly unbalanced. This is where you will need alot of hot melt glue sticks.

Connect a length of your enamel wire to the grub screw in the powerboard connector. then hang the board from a height so that it just hangs naturally.

Once done, you will need to apply layer after layer of hot melt glue blobs until the board levels out. Hot melt glue is nice and cheap and you can be assured that it will stay put once on there!

The first photo shows how unbalanced it is to start with, the second photo shows that it is now balanced.

Step 15: Make the Board Sturdy!


I found the board to be a little flimsy, so I cut another thin piece of veroboard and glued it vertically to the main arm board. This made it nice and rigid!

Step 16: Getting the Motor Base Together.


Now I apologize for not making this into more steps, but hopefully you will find it quite straight forward regardless.

You will need a base and mount to hold your motor and magnet (which is used in conjunction with the hall effect sensor)

I used an offcut piece of wood and painted it a nice gloss black - very pretty!

You will want to mount your motor in the center of the board and have a hole drilled out under it so you can feed your wires through to power the motor.

Once this is in place, you will need to rip apart your other motor and take out one of the two graphite blocks that the motor uses to transfer power to the rotor. We will use this to transfer Vcc to the spinning board.

Now with some pretty tough solid core wire, wrap it around a pen to make yourself a spring. Solder the spring onto a small piece of veroboard and then hot glue it to the motor frame assembly. Then you can simply 'screw' in the graphite brush because it should have a strip of copper attached to it.

Next, get your POV project and mount it onto the motor by placing it over the motor shaft and screwing in the grub screw to hold it firmly in place. The power transfer board should come into contact with the graphite block on the spring - it should remain in contact at all times as you rotate it through 360 degrees. If it doesn't you may need to undo the screw and tweak the alignment slightly.

Now solder the positive wire from your 7.5volt power supply to the spring / graphite block assembly and the negative wire you can connect to the motor housing.

We transfer ground to the spinning board via the motor housing (since it is all metal) then we transfer the positive side of things via the graphite brush - it works a treat! Graphite is self lubricating so it lasts for quite a while.

Step 17: Attach the Rare Earth Magnet.


Now we are just about done!

So that we can get a point of reference for which to start drawing each frame, I have included a rare earth magnet and a hall effect sensor.

You will need to cut one more thin piece of veroboard to act as a standoff for the magnet. Glue the magnet to the veroboard and then the other end to the wood base directly underneath the hall effect sensor.

It doesn't matter where on the board you put it, just as long as somewhere in it's rotation, the hall effect sensor will pass over the magnet.

Just a side note, my hall effect sensor required the south pole to be facing it (it won't work if you have the north pole of the magnet facing up)

And that is it for the construction!

Now we can get into the software side of things and start displaying some graphics / animations etc...

Step 18: Using the Included Software and Customizing Your Display.



I have programmed two applications using visual basic to allow you to convert your own images for to show on the spinning display. Again, you can download these from here:

http://www.bradsprojects.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=17&t=344

Now remember that the LED's are only turning on and off. There is no variation in brightness so this gives us a total of eight colors to work with. Having said that, the conversion software does not to bad a job and giving you a presentable output.

The first application allows you to import quite a large image and then it will display it on the POV display by scrolling it from top to bottom. You can import just about any image that you want however you need to make sure that the output settings you enter in are less than or equal to the image size otherwise you will get an error (because the software will be trying to convert pixels that don't exist!

Furthermore, since the display has eight LED's, you need to make sure that the height of your output image is divisible by eight.

other than that - you can go nuts and try whatever you like. You can adjust the LED on and off times and also the speed of the animation. The greater the LED on time, then the more stretched the image will be. The greater the LED off time then the greater the space between pixels.

The second application is for scrolling text and images from left to right. This is perfect for something like a shop window for if you wanted to do some cool looking advertising. Again this is quite customizable although this time you can't change the height of the graphic because there are only eight LED's and we are not scrolling vertically. You can change the LED on time and off time, the speed and you can also specify how many columns you want to be displayed at any one time.

Please read on to the next step for full details of how to use the display in scroll down mode.

Step 19: Using the Display in 'Scroll Down' Mode.



This mode of operation allows you to have rather large graphics and display them using just eight LED's!

It does this by scrolling the image from top to bottom.

Firstly, you need to download this zip file:
http://www.bradsprojects.com/forum/download/file.php?id=294

You will also need swordfish basic to compile the code that the conversion software will generate.
That can be downloaded here:
http://www.sfcompiler.co.uk/downloads/SwordfishSE.exe

Once downloaded and unzipped, you will need to copy the povdata folder into your c:\ directory. This folder contains text data which is used in the conversion process - it will not work without this folder.

Then you simply click the setup icon to install the software.

Now since my windows registration is registered to my work, the location that the software is installed to is actually 'National Aerospace Training Centre' which is in your start menu. I actually don't know how to change that at the moment...

Once you install it, it should run automatically. and you will be presented with the main screen (see first photo)

I have included a sample image that you can convert straight away, to do this - simply click convert. it will update the converted image to look like the one in the first photo below.

You can then open up your own image, you just need to then update the output properties in the top left corner to match the dimensions of your image - also, the height dimension must be divisible by eight (because the display uses eight pixels)

You can then click convert to see what your picture will look like in 3-bit color!

Once done, click the 'get code' button and the program will generate all the code required for the microcontroller.

Give it a few seconds and a message box will appear letting you know that the conversion is complete and that it has copied this data to the clipboard. (see second photo)

So then you need to open up Swordfish basic and click 'edit' 'paste' to paste the data in. Then hit F9 to complie the code into a hex file. (see third photo)

Open up your pickit2 software and with the pickit2 connected to your display, open the hex file and copy it onto the mcirocontroller. And that's it - your animation will now be displayed on the Spinning POV display! (see fourth photo)


Step 20: Using the Display in 'Scroll Left' Mode.

This mode of operation allows you to have a long image of text and graphics and then have it scroll from right to left.

Firstly, you need to download this zip file:
http://www.bradsprojects.com/forum/download/file.php?id=290

You will also need swordfish basic to compile the code that the conversion software will generate.
That can be downloaded here:
http://www.sfcompiler.co.uk/downloads/SwordfishSE.exe

Once downloaded and unzipped, you will need to copy the povdata folder into your c:\ directory. This folder contains text data which is used in the conversion process - it will not work without this folder.

Then you simply click the setup icon to install the software.

Now since my windows registration is registered to my work, the location that the software is installed to is actually 'National Aerospace Training Centre' which is in your start menu. I actually don't know how to change that at the moment...

Once you install it, it should run automatically. and you will be presented with the main screen (see first photo)

I have included a sample image that you can convert straight away, to do this - simply click convert. it will update the converted image to look like the one in the first photo below.

You can then open up your own image, you just need to then update the output properties in the top left corner to match the width of your image.

You can then click convert to see what your picture will look like in 3-bit color!

Once done, click the 'get code' button and the program will generate all the code required for the microcontroller.

Give it a few seconds and a message box will appear letting you know that the conversion is complete and that it has copied this data to the clipboard. (see second photo)

So then you need to open up Swordfish basic and click 'edit' 'paste' to paste the data in. Then hit F9 to complie the code into a hex file. (see third photo)

Open up your pickit2 software and with the pickit2 connected to your display, open the hex file and copy it onto the mcirocontroller. And that's it - your animation will now be displayed on the Spinning POV display! (see fourth photo)

Step 21: Thankyou's



I would first like to thank my wonderful wife and two boys for giving me some extra time to spend on writing this instructable. I would like to thank all those who drop in over at my website and forum www.bradsprojects.com it's great sharing idea's with you guys!

Special thanks to the guys (especially Graham) at www.digital-diy.com thanks for all the hints and tips!

Thanks to the knowledgeable people over at dreamingincode.com (you guys sure know what you're talking about!)

I love designing electronic projects, it certainly is a great passion of mine. God is the original designer and I love following in His footsteps by designing things of my own!

And thanks to all of you for taking the time to read through all these steps.


<p>I'm about to build it for my wife's birthday.... I'm having trouble finding the 18F4680, however, here in Mexico I can get the 4620 easily... I saw you told a guy that he needed to change the code a bit... could you please elaborate a little more on that? or help me in that part? THANKS A LOT!... I really hope you get to read this... last comment is from 2 years ago.....</p>
<p>in india pic18f4680 is not available .............. any other suggestion pls ???</p>
<p>which hall effect sensor did u use??? pls tell me i have to buy it and he is asking for the no. ??</p>
<p>why can't i install the softwares? please help. :(</p>
<p>Hi. I just happened to use this as my final project in one of my subjects this semester. I encountered some problems looking for the same pic that u used in this project and I've seen a comment here that says it is okay to replace it with pic16f877A but then u said that it is not supported by the swordfish application that will be used for conversion. So what application can I used for this pic? Also, after reading all the procedures to be done, I'm just so confuse about something. Where did u use pickit2? I dont know when and where to use it. Is it attached to the whole prototype or it will just be used for the programming part? Hope I can get a reply from you. Thanks!!! :)</p>
<p>Good day everyone. </p><p>Sorry to barge in with a lil bit of a different topic I know you guys are showing how to make the LED display from scratch but my question is:</p><p> I have a Gemmy miniature fanatic dog led display. I was wondering if you guys know if I can reprogram the existing message to one of my own? Is there a way to change the whole programing maybe even the song? </p><p>This is the vid. of the fanatic dog. </p><p><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="281" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/B9atPiWuarw" width="500"></iframe></p><p>Thanks very much!</p>
<p>thanks brads for this project i'm successfully make this project here my video</p><p> https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=695840453805128&amp;set=vb.413148995407610&amp;type=2&amp;theater</p>
<p>hello did u guys got any ppt ??</p>
Hello I uploaded your POV Conversion software and it converts the images even the one you included in it but when I try to get the code it locks up and becomes unresponsive is this an issue you've ever encountered?
can i do this project with PIC 18LF4680-i/p???
Yes, LF just means that it can work at a lower voltage and i/p just tells you the chip packaging. I think i/p means it is a through hole DIP component.
apology not speak English I'm using a translator... <br>in advance thank you very much for your input .. well my question the capacitor that is connected to VDD also are putting another capacitor to VSS .. thanks for your answer. well I'll start doing it now <br>
Hi, you just need to connect a capacitor between VCC and VSS :)
Hello <br>Can i use a PIC18f4550 because the other 18F4860 isnt available here. Thanks in advance. And this is an awesome project.
Hey <br>How can you make an imge with text in it for the scrolling text? I've found some software that allowed me to make an image with text in it but it's only in one color. So how did you make that &quot;instructables AND sparkfun PRESENT microcontroller contest&quot; image? <br> <br>Kind regards <br>Bernd
Hi Brad! <br> <br>I have an other question. I proved the project but it appears the same image four times on every lap with the PovConverterBigGraphics. How can I resolve that?
Nice project!! <br> <br>I have one question. In the schematic, why the sensor hall out is attached to the pin RE2 and not to the pin MCLR to reset the PIC and draw a new image? I don't understand that. <br> <br>
You could compare it to resetting your computer. You would never get anything achieved if you constantly reset your computer.<br><br>It's the same with this project, the hall effect sensor is connected to RE2 and there is some code that is monitoring RE2 and waiting for it to go high (I am pretty sure it's high...) and when it sees it go high it then runs the code to draw the next image.<br><br>
Ok here is the link! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yy-B4y_bI1k i'm using it as the display part of a class project in an intro to engineering course. The display reads &quot;UCO ALERT SCOUT WARNING SYSTEM ACTIVE&quot; took some playing around with paint and 8 bit artistry lol.. But eh.. not bad!
By the way.. Enjoyed the philippians comment in the code brother.
It's working! All be it not exactly at its best but well enough to add to my project due tomorrow.. I'll perfect the balancing etc after that :)
Thank you for the quick replies. You have been a great help and this particular project has brought more understanding to me than my labs in class. Now that I am learning how to properly read the schematic it's getting a little easier. I'm excited to see if it works! Thanks again my friend!
Please ignore my question about the pickit 2! I have read all the previous questions and got it figured out.. BUT I do have one major question. I'm confused how the voltage regulator fits in? On the schematic I'm not seeing it tied it.. <br> <br>1. Does the &quot;In&quot; pin take in voltage directly from the power supply and the &quot;out&quot; then go to all the VCC? and <br>2. Does the board need to be cut between each pin? It looks like on the schematic that it does NOT need to be cut between each pin that the middle ground somehow makes sure the higher voltage doesn't pass to the otherside? <br> <br>Please help! I think I may have the rest figured out for now. Got one more week before I have to tie it into the rest of my project and present! You're awesome thanks!!
Hi in answer to your questions: <br>1) the IN pin connects directly to the +ve connection of the power supply coming in. The GND pin goes to the -ve connection of the power supply coming in. You then have 5v coming out which becomes your Vcc connection. Ground is common to both input and output. <br> <br>2) the veroboard I have used (otherwise known as strip board) has tracks connected in rows but each track is not connected to the other. so you just need to make sure that you cut the tracks so that the top and bottom legs of the microcontroller aren't touching each other. and also that each side of the resistor aren't touching each other. Have a good look at the progressive photo's to see where the cuts are. Hope it all comes together for you nicely!
Hey! The software doesnt seem to work .. I did copy the povdata folder into the c drive ... but still it hangs after I click 'Get code' ... BTW thanks for such a great Project!
Sorry for posting a lot. But I was hoping you could tell me what RPM the motor needs to be capable of reaching?
The RPM of the motor is not so important (I.e. pretty much any motor can handle speeds in the 1,000's of RPM) this project only requires around 25 - 30 RPM to get a good image. What is important is that it can handle the load attached to it. I just bought a 12V motor which was around $10 and it had plenty of torque to handle my project.
Thank you. I'm going to build this and integrate it into a project I'm doing for my college engineering course. I originally was going to use a single stationary display, but this will add 'awe' :) I'm a total novice though so hopefully I can pull it off. I'll post a video once we're done with the whole thing! **** Sorry it is not allowing me to post as a reply.. Its asking for the captcha but not displaying one..? Anyway I will post my project.. Wish me luck!
On the 100 uF capacitors Does the voltage matter whether 25 or 100 etc? Or will any type 100uF work?
Either of those voltage ratings will work. You just want to make sure you use a value that is higher than the voltage you are working with. E.G. if you're working with 5v then you would get caps that are rated at maybe 16v etc...
Hi, I love to built this project but I don't know how I have to connect the header :( <br>I can't find it in your schematic (I'm quite new in electronics) plz help :) <br> <br>Thanks
Hi there BRAD, i am from the philippines, and building this instructables for my wife. I already did the whole thing although using 18f4620. but i am having problems looking for the hall sensor. I dismantled one part from those PC blower fan, with 6125 written on it, found the data sheet for the right pin out, used it on the POV but in vain. when it passes the magnet the led stay off permanently. <br> <br>QUESTION: what can be an alternative replacement for a hall sensor, (very difficult to purchase it from my country) <br> <br>2. How to balanced the whole thing, MINE keeps vibrating as if there's an earthquake a top on my table? <br> <br>3.If i finally make it work 100%, can i repost the whole thing of course linking to your site to my own BLOG. <br> <br>and <br> <br>4. thank you very much for this wonderful creation.
You could use an infrared led and photo-diode instead. The photo diode would be the sensor (which is attached to the spinning board) and the LED would be on the main base of the unit. As it spins, the photo diode will pass by the LED and that would send a logic 1 to the microcontroller to tell it to draw the graphics.<br><br>It is hard to balance, I just tied some string the the center of it and hung it upside down. I then applied some hot melt glue to it until it was balancing perfectly :)<br><br>You can feel free to post it anywhere you like!
thank you..after hours of looking for that hall sensor, i finally make it work, using another PC fan sensor with 276 written on it. its a dual hall effect just tied the other out to ground and VOILA!!!..it works.first tried to burn the original scroll text via your software..it scroll the right text...but then when i tried to put other colored text and convert it, the text output are not that clear, i mean the letters are somewhat incomplete sometime at the top others at the bottom...was it the software or the image being converted.. <br> <br>I have practically no idea how you made the original text on the POV software &quot;instructables and spark fun present microcontroller project&quot; image.. <br> <br>what other software possible to use for the scroll right to left... <br> <br>thanks in advance
can i do the same thing with pic16f877. if so can i use the same software and schematic?
Unfortunately you wouldn't be able to use the software that I have made here. <br><br>My software will output code that is designed for Swordfish basic (which only supports 18f microcontrollers)
Hi Brad <br>i love what you made and i trying to make one the same. <br>I faced a problem with POV converter software it hangs when i try to convert to hex. <br>Kindly guide if there is another software to do the same job.
Let me rephrase that, all gnds are connected, and all the vcc are connected? Right? I cant tell on the soldering job pic or the schematic since it doesn't say if they should be. THey should.. right? <br> <br>Oh i looked at the microchip data sheet and found the pins matched with your schematic :) <br> <br>THank you so much you have helped me a bunch, you really don't know how much you are helping.
Yep, everywhere you see a GND, they will all connect to each other (and to ground of the power supply). Everywhere you see VCC they will all connect together (and to the +ve of the power supply.)<br><br>Glad I could help :)
So if all my gnd and vcc connections are connected it does't matter if i arrange in my own way on the circuit board? Also i want to make sure for the 5 pin header, only two pins are being sent info(gnd aand vcc) right? WHat are the other three pins for then? <br> Thank you so much :)
You can arrange it how ever you like, just as long as they are connected correctly. You do need the other three pins (there are actually 6 pins on the pickit2 but the AUX pin is not used) However the other 3 (VPP, PGD and PGC) are required to program the code onto the microcontroller. These connect to the pins of the same name on the microcontroller.
Is there a way to modify this to work with my common anode RGB LEDs? And what is a hall effect sensor? This is definitely gonna be my next project... Thanks for posting
All you need to do to get it to work with common anode LED's is to connect the anodes to Vcc (instead of ground as per the instructable)<br><br>Then, I will modify the included software so that the user can select between common anode or common cathode LED's<br><br>All I need to do is modify the code so that it inverts the data just before sending to the LED's<br><br>As for the hall effect sensor - it is a simple little device that switches from a high to a low state on the output when it senses magnetism. I use it so that the display will always start drawing each frame from exactly the same location each time. I.E. it will start drawing when the hall effect sensor passes over the magnet.
hey !! could you please tell me how to invert the output of the microcontroler before sending it to common anode rgb led's....
you just need to add xor %11111111 after the data out lines of code.<br><br>Just check the image for details. <br><br>When you XOR a binary number with a logic 1, it inverts that digit. since there are eight binary digit per byte that we wend out, we need to invert all eight.
Sorry to keep asking questions but.. <br> <br>I get how this project works except i have come down to two problems. First the hall effect sensor you have shown has 4 pins and most have three, is that going to be a problem if i get one with three like the link below? I noticed it just doesn't have the enoble part, is that a problem? <br> <br>http://www.taydaelectronics.com/a1302-continuous-time-ratiometric-linear-hall-effect-sensor-ic.html <br> <br>Also, I can't find this terminator anywhere near locally, or online. I know i have asked about this already but is it possible you could mail it to me and i could pay. That is if you have access to them. I have looked at other options such as couplings, could these work? <br>Thx so much
you should be fine to use one with three pins - I think that I just permanently leave mine enabled anyway. As for the terminator - I found this one on the lowes website - should do the job nicely:<br> <br> <a rel="nofollow">http://www.lowes.com/pd_36523-12704-770144L_4294722554__?productId=3128701&amp;Ns=p_product_qty_sales_dollar|1&amp;pl=1&amp;currentURL=%3FNs%3Dp_product_qty_sales_dollar%7C1&amp;facetInfo=</a><br>
hello to all very good just what I was looking for a long time. I get the 18f4685 is the same but with more memory? genius thousand thanks <br> <br>hola ante todo muy bueno &iexcl;&iexcl; es justo lo que estuve buscando durante mucho tiempo. yo consigo el 18f4685 es igual pero con mas memoria no? genio mil gracias
Hi Brad,<br>I have built the model but facing some problems,<br><br>1. whatever the image i give it is displaying as mirror images !<br>2.text scrolling is from left to right.<br>3.Scrolling of text is very slow , even when i set animation speed to 1<br><br>Also which motor u have used ??? what is its rpm ???<br><br>Please help !!!
Sorry for the late reply. <br> <br>1. Your motor is spinning backwards <br>2. Your motor is spinning backwards <br>3. To speed it up (faster than animation speed 1) you will need to run the microcontroller at a faster clock speed) At the moment I am only running it at 8Mhz - if you changed the code slightly so that it ran at 32Mhz, it would scroll four times as fast.

About This Instructable

85,150views

155favorites

License:

More by bradsprojects:The Four Player Coffee Table Pong Video Game. The 'One Chip Spinning RGB POV Display' with conversion software. Christmas card with inbuilt retro video game for under $10 
Add instructable to: