Alright first ible, here we go. Used this for my second: http://www.instructables.com/id/Gorget-neck-armour-neck-armor/

Ok so small update, although I got voted up to 4th position the judges didn't find my ible good/relative enough to pass the first round:(, but I still want to thank everyone who voted for my ible!!

I wanted to etch an image onto my neckarmour(gorget) but i found no instructable on how to etch larger metal pieces, just a load on etching smaller pieces(mostly knives). Considering the size of this etching and the size of the metal, it would take too long to do by hand(the q-tip method) and too large to do with the submerged method, so i flipped the submerged method over and came up with this:

Step 1: Tools and materials

A simple list of materials, if you dont have these items just improvise.

your metal piece
a piece of waste metal
an adaptor / 9v battery (i used a 12.5v adaptor)
few pieces of copper wire
bag of tealights / paraffin candles (i used about 10, it depends on the size of your design)
nailpolish (doesnt matter what colour, wouldn't go for metal colour :P)
nailpolish remover / acetone
exacto knife / hobby knife
lots of tissues

*optional items*
A4 sticker paper
pen / pencil
<p>Thanks for this, I had no idea you could use vinegar and salt. I usually use distilled water then mix in salt until it can no longer dissolve. </p><p>Beautiful etching.</p>
<p>you say to use an adaptor but the adapter only has one cable for power where is the negative connected to?</p>
<p>Any pictures on how the wires are connected tothe power adaptor?</p>
<p>How deep does it etch?</p>
<p>this method is a pain in the ass. Scratching off nail polish sucks. Ferric chloride is the way to go. You can use sharpie or masking tape as a resist with out undercutting. The only reason I didn't use it on large pieces is because is its expensive ( $100 a gallon plus hazardous shipping costs ) radio shack sold it in pints For etching circuit boards but they might not sell it anymore. But I recently found the recipe on how to make it out of muriatic acid on instuctables. Now you are basically limited by the size of the plastic bin you use. Hope this gets to you before you start your next large piece. The level of complexity you can get for minimal effort with the sharpie is awesome and if your blocking out larger areas like you were using masking tape is great without having yo worry about missing some nail polish. As far as applying the design you just draw on the metal with pencil and go over it with sharpie or onto the masking tape and remove the excess with xacto knife. If you're trying to speed up the etch you use an air bubbler from a fish tank.</p>
<p>hi im using your method but was wondering would play doh work instead of candles</p>
I think this has been asked before but yes, as long as it doesn't react with the metal / etching solution any moldable &quot;clay&quot; could be used.<br>to make sure just take a small piece of the same metal sand it down a bit and put some play doh on it, likewise test some more playdoh by putting it into a bowl of your etching solution. if nothing hapens to either you're good to go! hope this answers your question. cheers, knut
<p>Used your instructable to edge a lock i made using <a href="http://www.instructables.com/id/Viking-Era-800-1050-Padlock/" rel="nofollow">this</a> instructable. I only made some mistakes during the etching. Because I didn't clean the metal good enough the nail polish loosened during etching. Therefore I needed to stop early, so the etch is barely visible.</p><p>I do have an improvement for this method (for flat surfaces). Print your design on a sticker. Place the sticker on the metal and cut the design. Remove the parts you don't want to etch. Add the nail polish and remove the sticker from under the nail polish when it's almost hardened.</p>
Good point putting the nailpolish on top of the sticker, however make sure your sticker doesnt leave any residue to mess up your etch. Thanks for the comment!
<p>There is another way to do etching without electricity. </p><p>Take one part muriatic acid and add it to two parts 3% hydrogen peroxide. Always add acid to water-based solutions not the other way around otherwise you risk a runaway thermodynamic reaction. Eg, put two cups peroxide into a _plastic_ bucket with a lid. Add one cup of muriatic acid to the peroxide... slowly. </p><p>Submerge your work piece in this solution. </p><p>Here's the best part, you can re-use this etchant over and over again by merely adding small quantities of both acid and peroxide. It will produce very deep and crisp etchings and you need to watch them carefully. </p>
<p>cool, yeah just use whatever is available.I just chose this method because i had everything right here at home so no need to go shopping;) thanks for the comment!</p>
<p>I voted for you...well done!</p>
<p>thank you :)</p>
<p>Awesome! </p><p>Now I just have to sneak nail polish from the wife....</p><p>Question: would using clay work as a dam? </p><p>VOTED!!!</p>
<p>Blu tac would work and it doesn't dry out. Great instructable and great lateral thinking!</p>
<p>good point, I dont know. I guess it would as long as its not a clay that reacts with acid (maybe some synthetic clays do I dont know)</p><p>thanks for the vote!</p>
<p>Polymer clay reacts to alcohol and solvents, but I don't think vinegar and water would effect it. Can't be 100% sure, but I think it would work well for this setup.</p>
<p>Just asked SWMBO about clay as she's a ceramics artist. She reckons that clay might work for a while but if you give it a chance to dry out it will start to shrink and crack. Not sure about polymer clays, they might react with the etching mix.</p>
<p>clay would work alot better than candles. i just used the resources available to me. thanks for the comment!</p>
<p>I think using candles and melted wax is a genius idea to be honest!</p>
<p>what the heck is SWMBO? cheers!</p>
<p>She Who Must Be Obeyed LOL!!</p>
<p>Great instructable! :) </p>
<p>thank you! :)</p>
<p>Great 'ible, but I was wondering if using a thin coat of melted wax, instead of nail polish, would work? It would be easier to scrape away, but harder to be certain you removed all of it from the etchable surface. There must be something easier and faster to use than nail polish.Thinking caps anyone?</p>
<p>I use cheap chloride rubber paint mix 50/50 with solvent. It easy stick to metal, protect surface and it's easy to remove with needle, toothpick or whatever tool you use.</p>
<p>ok nice method, i used candles because thats what was available for me. have you tried the paint? I would love to see your results because ill be etching my next project;)</p>
<p>It's made with chloride rubber paint but I etch it with ferric chloride not electro etching.</p>
<p>wow really nice how long did it take to carve the patern? thanks for the comment</p>
<p>few hours of carving and about half hour of etching</p>
<p>Colored wax?</p>
<p>i find that wax flakes off to quickly but if your design isn't too intricate i think wax might work. just be carefull not to get any wax on your etching surfaces. thnx for the comment</p>
<p>Not exactly the same methodology, but I think this would be faster and more accurate for intricate designs. Print a negative of your design with a laser printer and use heat to transfer it to the metal - if the work-piece is totally flat then use a clothes iron, if curved you might need some relief cuts in the paper to get it to lay flat and then tape it in place and use a heatgun or torch to heat the backside of the work-piece, and then maybe some pressure on the frontside with a thick towel... The transferred toner will protect the areas you don't want etched. After etching remove the toner with steel wool, fine sandpaper, SOYsolv or maybe Goo Gone for non-abrasive removal - I've never used this method, but I've seen other Instructibles that do, as well as many tutorials on the web.<br><a href="http://www.instructables.com/id/A-Stainless-Steel-Bitcoin-Wallet/" rel="nofollow">http://www.instructables.com/id/A-Stainless-Steel-...</a></p><p>Another option in the case where you have a stencil (or a very steady/artistic hand), a Sharpie pen will protect from etching as well - and they come in several sizes from ultra fine to giant. Remove the ink with rubbing alcohol. I've used this method to make simple PCB's before. Not my Instructible - <a href="http://www.instructables.com/id/Making-a-Hand-Drawn-PCB./" rel="nofollow">http://www.instructables.com/id/Making-a-Hand-Draw...</a></p><p>Pretty much anything that will make a waterproof seal should work... Spray paint and stencil, paint thinner to remove. </p><p>Props to the author for innovative use of candles. I'll file that one away for future use.</p>
<p>the main point of diy is reaching your goal with the materials you have. if you have the option of more high tech solutions use them! i tried to make this project with the resources i have and i think anybody has at home. thanks for the comment!</p>
<p>another method ive seen is electrical tape. the main reason i used nail polish is that it sticks to the metal way better than something like wax. also any wax that is left(even a really thin coat) would create lumps in your etch. thanks for your comment!</p>
<p>Q: In this step (4) how did you remove the nail polish from the larger areas without scratching the metal underneath? </p>
<p>*sidenote* i tried to do the large surfaces with a q-tip with acetone, DON'T DO THIS!!! it screwed up some of my design..... just stick with the hobby knife, unless you find a better way, if so post it right here!</p>
<p>I just scratched it away with a hobby knife (it was rather blunt). the point is the current follows the path of least resistance, so any edges that are created by scratching are etched away faster. thanks for your question, hope it helped!</p>
<p>Very nice,</p><p>The q-tip is a good idea to brush off the sludge that forms to get a crisp etch. Traditionally used is a feather as a brush. </p>
<p>ah ok cool, I just wanted to make sure the bubbles didn't create bumps in my etch;) thanks for the comment</p>
<p>It looks great. </p><p>What was the measurements of vinegar and salt mix?</p>
<p>pffff no idea sorry, I just kept putting in salt untill it stopped dissolving. thanks for the comment and hope it helped!</p>
<p>I've not seen this idea before for doing large pieces, thanks for doing the 'ible</p>
<p>thanks for the comment! yes, that was the main reason I made this ible;)</p>
<p>For what it's worth, when you get a scratch do not underestimate the power of a little burnishing to remove even deep scratches from metal.<br>Even the back of a teaspoon or the rounded end of a butter knife handle can do the trick nicely. </p>
<p>yes, you can restore any scratch but is it really worth the effort if just a little caution keeps your hard work safe;) thanks for the comment!</p>
<p>No super caustic acid like for glass, gOOd..</p><p> P.S. And no lazir stuff, just &quot;Working Man's&quot; materials, Thank You.</p>
<p>yes thats why i like this method just home supplies needed! just keep the chlorine gas in mind though! thanks for the comment</p>
<p>Modeling clay can be used as the dam. This material is made from waxes, oils, and finely ground clay powder. It and be modeled (duh) into any shape and afterward pulled off and reused. Available where ever kids crafts supplies are sold. I have found it in Fred Meyer (kroger) supermarkets in the crafts section. </p>
<p>good point, the main reason i used candles is because i had them at home ready to use. and i wasn't sure wich clay(if any) would react with metal/acids/salt. thanks for your comment!</p>

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