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  • HippyNerd commented on HippyNerd's instructable RGB LED Car Dash, and Door Lighting3 months ago
    RGB LED Car Dash, and Door Lighting

    If you can get the switch out, you may have to rewire a new switch, and drill a hole and mount the new switch. I would see if you can get the old bolt off, even if I had to chisel/file/saw it off.

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  • HippyNerd commented on HippyNerd's instructable RGB LED Car Dash, and Door Lighting3 months ago
    RGB LED Car Dash, and Door Lighting

    Any constant 12v power source. If you cant find one, you may need to run a wire to the battery (or some place that you find 12v, with the key out). I suggest putting a small fuse, like 5amp, for short protection if you run a wire to the battery.

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  • Charliecube -- Charlieplexed 4x4x4 RGB LED cube

    Awesome buddy, thats great news. Now that you have a working cube, you can mess with programs, and really make it your own thing.

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  • Charliecube -- Charlieplexed 4x4x4 RGB LED cube

    DIfferent color LEDs have different forward voltages, the red ones are always very low, usually just under 2 volts, and the blue and green are around 3 volts. The ghosting you are seeing is a direct result of the unequal pairing. Since the microcontroller is running at 5v, and this design doesnt use resistors, technically they are runing much higher voltage (and current) than they should be, but the resistor value is different for different color LEDs, so you cant add one size resistor to equalize things. I have found that adding a resistor on each of the 16 microcontroller leads does help reduce the ghosting some, but it comes at the cost of brightness.If the cube is run in daylight, its hard to see, if the cube is run in the dark, then being dimmer is not really a problem. Ive used be...see more »DIfferent color LEDs have different forward voltages, the red ones are always very low, usually just under 2 volts, and the blue and green are around 3 volts. The ghosting you are seeing is a direct result of the unequal pairing. Since the microcontroller is running at 5v, and this design doesnt use resistors, technically they are runing much higher voltage (and current) than they should be, but the resistor value is different for different color LEDs, so you cant add one size resistor to equalize things. I have found that adding a resistor on each of the 16 microcontroller leads does help reduce the ghosting some, but it comes at the cost of brightness.If the cube is run in daylight, its hard to see, if the cube is run in the dark, then being dimmer is not really a problem. Ive used between 75 and 150 ohms, and 100 ohms seems to work pretty good, but there is no perfect/ideal value.There is also a little bit of an issue with the built in LED on pin 13. Some folks remove the LED, others have re-wired and programmed to use a different pin than 13. It doesnt bother me, so I havnt bothered to change it.

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