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  • KellyCraig commented on Scotttland's instructable Repairing Split Wood4 days ago
    Repairing Split Wood

    Sorry for being so slow to get back to you.Keep in mind, stain is, for the most part, a surface coat. Of course, much of it can get into cracks, grooves and open cells below the surface.If the wood isn't oozing oil, it shouldn't be any problem staining it. As they say, do a small test sample. Let it set the appropriate amount of time to see if it hardens. If it does, you're good to go.Water based stains aside, stains are made with linseed oil, a hardening oil. If you apply them to wood after the fact, they will act to seal the wood, at least to some degree. That will help seal moisture out and reduce moisture loss, in addition to what the oil does.Anyway, I would slather oil on the top, sides and, if practical, the bottom. Let it soak in, and let it set for a few weeks before appl...see more »Sorry for being so slow to get back to you.Keep in mind, stain is, for the most part, a surface coat. Of course, much of it can get into cracks, grooves and open cells below the surface.If the wood isn't oozing oil, it shouldn't be any problem staining it. As they say, do a small test sample. Let it set the appropriate amount of time to see if it hardens. If it does, you're good to go.Water based stains aside, stains are made with linseed oil, a hardening oil. If you apply them to wood after the fact, they will act to seal the wood, at least to some degree. That will help seal moisture out and reduce moisture loss, in addition to what the oil does.Anyway, I would slather oil on the top, sides and, if practical, the bottom. Let it soak in, and let it set for a few weeks before applying the stain. Monitor some small cracks or splits to see if they are starting to close. If they are, you might want to drag the process out. When you think you've done all you can, go to the stain. If you are ready to bag it and move on, you can wash the excess off with a good oil busting dish soap. Just let it dry for a day or two before moving ahead.Again, remember oil is a surface coat and not the most durable/wearing finish, to say the least.

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  • KellyCraig commented on mdavis19's instructable Learn how to cut circles out of glass1 month ago
    Learn how to cut circles out of glass

    On a whim I just bought about twenty pounds of lead solder, a few hundred pounds of stained glass, about eighty feet of came (the stuff they use for edges of leaded glass), five or six rolls of foil and a few tools, including a grinder and iron, for a hundred bucks. I've never dabbled in stained or leaded glass before, but I've been mildly curious about it. The deal was a great chance to test the waters. Since the deal didn't include a glass cutter, I resorted to the trusty ones in my tool box, trimmed a few pieces of scrap that were included, foiled and soldered them. Meanwhile, I bought a couple good ones (carbide wheels) off line. When the new cutters arrived, I tested them and, WOW. Night and day. Now I know not to just leave the cutters bouncing off other tools during storage....see more »On a whim I just bought about twenty pounds of lead solder, a few hundred pounds of stained glass, about eighty feet of came (the stuff they use for edges of leaded glass), five or six rolls of foil and a few tools, including a grinder and iron, for a hundred bucks. I've never dabbled in stained or leaded glass before, but I've been mildly curious about it. The deal was a great chance to test the waters. Since the deal didn't include a glass cutter, I resorted to the trusty ones in my tool box, trimmed a few pieces of scrap that were included, foiled and soldered them. Meanwhile, I bought a couple good ones (carbide wheels) off line. When the new cutters arrived, I tested them and, WOW. Night and day. Now I know not to just leave the cutters bouncing off other tools during storage. From what others say, I'll come to appreciate the carbide cutters, if I take care of them (e.g., fill and use the oil reservoirs or dip the tips in oil routinely).I'm anxious to try some circles now too. Thanks for the tips.

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  • KellyCraig commented on Scotttland's instructable Repairing Split Wood1 month ago
    Repairing Split Wood

    I buy my epoxy in the gallon and a half containers (2-1 mix) and use it for cracks. The two to one mix seems much thinner than the fifty-fifty mixes I use, so it soaks in well.For light woods, I don't color the mix. No one has yet to notice the clear fill on in large cracks on a few butternut and other light wood ornaments I've madePainters' putty works good for sealing the end of the cracks. The portion with the putty can be cut off with a miter or other means.

    For those dealing with cracked beams and such, the ideal is to address the problem before it starts. Sealing the wood doesn't work. Eventually, the wood will still lose moisture, which causes it to shrink, resulting in splits and cracks. I purchased a maple cutting board with this problem, then restored it using the approach noted below.For the butcher block, I flooded the top with mineral oil. The first bottle disappeared almost as soon as I put it on. The second went in slower, so I just added more to the spots that soaked in each time I walked past to another project. Finally, it began taking the oil in rather slowly. At that point, I slathered on a generous layer and just walked way.I ignored the top for a couple weeks. When I checked on it again, the oil had all soaked in. T...see more »For those dealing with cracked beams and such, the ideal is to address the problem before it starts. Sealing the wood doesn't work. Eventually, the wood will still lose moisture, which causes it to shrink, resulting in splits and cracks. I purchased a maple cutting board with this problem, then restored it using the approach noted below.For the butcher block, I flooded the top with mineral oil. The first bottle disappeared almost as soon as I put it on. The second went in slower, so I just added more to the spots that soaked in each time I walked past to another project. Finally, it began taking the oil in rather slowly. At that point, I slathered on a generous layer and just walked way.I ignored the top for a couple weeks. When I checked on it again, the oil had all soaked in. Too, it swelled the wood, just as water would, causing ALL the cracks and separations to close.The same approach can be taken with exterior wood surfaces. If you applied a generous first application, the obviousness of your efforts would disappear shortly. A second application would fare only a bit better. However, the third or additional coats would remain evident for years.The oil applications do not evaporate. They disappear because the oil wicks to the next dry area, deeper in the wood, until there is too little oil to wick further or the saturation has equalized throughout the wood.The main things, when using oils to replace lost moisture are:1) Use a non-hardening oil. That could be something like Chevron Shingle Oil (about ten dollars a gallon, in quantity), cheap motor oil (your mileage may vary) or mineral oil.2) To increase penetration, I'd thin it about ten or fifteen percent. You can use paint thinner, naphtha, mineral spirits or turpentine. I'd opt for the cheapest, unless I was working on a specialty project. 3) The more aggressive and patient you are in your applications, the better your results will be. You can keep adding oil without doing anything to the surface, whether a day after an application or years after. The applications will build on each other .HINT: Buy the cheapest mineral oil you can for food grade items. That would be around a buck or so a pint.NOTES: Cedar shingles that are saturated with oil, in addition to not shrinking and splitting or cracking, will remain more resilient. Normally, walking on them in the middle of the summer would cause them to break. However, if they were saturated with oil, the would remain more flexible and less prone to breakage.

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  • Inexpensive garage lights from LED strips

    Just guessing here, but I suspect heat is a lessor problem with LED's used as they are in this ible because they are so spread out.My dine room has the incandescent shaped LED's and the heat sinks get too hot to hold. On the other hand, I have strips that use as much light, but touching anywhere along the strip is a non issue.

    One of the advantages of the magnetic power supplies is, you can dim through them, instead of just on the output.When I remodeled my kitchen, LED's were still cost prohibitive, so I wired the counter lights for halogens. This meant I had 120VAC to the lights and dimming at the switch panel could only be done by adjusting the 120 volt output to the lights.Standard transformers-rectifiers are inexpensive, but you can only alter the power they put out, and not what is put into them. Magnetic transformer-rectifiers don't have this limitation. This means you can put the transformer near the load and adjust what's fed into it. Using a magnetic power supply, you still have to use a switch designed for LED's and you will pay at least three times as much for the power supply, but it does all...see more »One of the advantages of the magnetic power supplies is, you can dim through them, instead of just on the output.When I remodeled my kitchen, LED's were still cost prohibitive, so I wired the counter lights for halogens. This meant I had 120VAC to the lights and dimming at the switch panel could only be done by adjusting the 120 volt output to the lights.Standard transformers-rectifiers are inexpensive, but you can only alter the power they put out, and not what is put into them. Magnetic transformer-rectifiers don't have this limitation. This means you can put the transformer near the load and adjust what's fed into it. Using a magnetic power supply, you still have to use a switch designed for LED's and you will pay at least three times as much for the power supply, but it does allow you to install dimmable LED's on an existing systems, without tearing up walls to run a low voltage line back to the switche.

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