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15Instructables72,408Views179CommentsDesert Aire, Eastern Washington Joined August 17th, 2009

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  • KellyCraig's entry SMALL PARTS HOLDING CLAMP is a finalist in the Build a Tool Contest 2017 contest 2 days ago
  • KellyCraig commented on KellyCraig's instructable SMALL PARTS HOLDING CLAMP2 weeks ago
    SMALL PARTS HOLDING CLAMP

    I blew apart a small clamp today, while assembling it. Where the T-nut went down into the wood was not enlarged to accommodate that part and the pressure caused the ply to push apart. So I'll have to edit and add that caution.The good news is, the glue joint held fine.

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    • L-square Edge Stop - Depth Gauge - Set Up Gauge
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      0 comments
  • KellyCraig commented on Moy perez woodshop's instructable Miter Saw Station Build3 weeks ago
    Miter Saw Station Build

    Mine was nowhere near as beautiful as this. It was just functional, and handy because of things like the stops.I would offer only one recommendation: Since this is one of those things that could easily be a generational hand-me-down, it's likely different miters would be used on it. For example, my first miter was a Delta. My next was a Dewalt and my current one is a Bosch. It is common for miters to have tables that are different heights, measuring from the surface they are mounted on. For this reason, consider:1) making the area where the miter will rest at least 3" lower;2) installing 2x pieces (e.g., about 4"x4") under each corner of the surface on which you intend to rest the miter;3) drill a hole large enough to drop at least a 1/2" bolt through (larger woul...see more »Mine was nowhere near as beautiful as this. It was just functional, and handy because of things like the stops.I would offer only one recommendation: Since this is one of those things that could easily be a generational hand-me-down, it's likely different miters would be used on it. For example, my first miter was a Delta. My next was a Dewalt and my current one is a Bosch. It is common for miters to have tables that are different heights, measuring from the surface they are mounted on. For this reason, consider:1) making the area where the miter will rest at least 3" lower;2) installing 2x pieces (e.g., about 4"x4") under each corner of the surface on which you intend to rest the miter;3) drill a hole large enough to drop at least a 1/2" bolt through (larger would be better, but that will do);4) cut the head off a six inch bolt and add four nuts and a washer - mount one nut flush with one end of the bolt and use the second bolt up against it to lock the first nut in place (this end goes up); - mount two nuts a few inches up the other end and follow them with a washer. This part drops down the holes and can be adjusted the [double nut] locked in place, allowing you to raise and lower the bolts. \ - lay a piece of ply on top and adjust for depth of your miter box.

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  • KellyCraig's instructable SMALL PARTS CLAMP's weekly stats: 3 weeks ago
    • SMALL PARTS CLAMP
      11,421 views
      89 favorites
      3 comments
  • KellyCraig followed Woodworking and Tools channel 4 weeks ago
  • KellyCraig followed rjeblogue4 weeks ago
      • Dishwasher Converted Pizza Oven-Smoker
      • Make Eggrolls or Wontons on your Foreman grill, sandwich maker or waffle iron
      • Use a Treadmill DC Drive Motor and PWM Speed Controller for powering tools
  • KellyCraig commented on KellyCraig's instructable Band Saw Log Sled1 month ago
    Band Saw Log Sled

    Thanks for the photos. This helps a lot. From them, it looks like a good solution too.

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  • KellyCraig's instructable Making a Turned-Off-Center Door Stop's weekly stats: 1 month ago
    • Making a Turned-Off-Center Door Stop
      1,462 views
      8 favorites
      2 comments
  • KellyCraig commented on KellyCraig's instructable Making a Turned-Off-Center Door Stop1 month ago
    Making a Turned-Off-Center Door Stop

    Aha! A book scoop. Right, Frank? ;)

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  • KellyCraig entered SMALL PARTS CLAMP in the Build a Tool Contest 2017 contest 1 month ago
  • KellyCraig commented on Phil B's instructable Really Good Pusher Stick1 month ago
    Really Good Pusher Stick

    I cannot emphasis enough what a great idea it is to use a "push shoe," rather than just push sticks.I have a cabinet saw (my second) and have owned at least six table saws. I started using push shoes decades ago, since I find push sticks to be pathetic attempts at safety (but better than nothing). Shoes, like Phil's, hold the wood down at the back of the blade, where the blade might lift the material and cause a dangerous kickback. Since using variations of these (and a splitter), I've only had a couple minor kickbacks over the decades.

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  • How to Clean Sandpaper on Powertools

    Now, go get that tube of silicone caulk you set aside and which hardened in your absence, cut the hardened caulk free and see what that does.

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  • KellyCraig commented on DouglasC10's instructable How to Drive Safely in a Snowstorm2 months ago
    How to Drive Safely in a Snowstorm

    My dad was State Highway foreman for the North Cross Highway when it opened. He had his men kick their pickups into neutral coming down the hill to deal with the engine pushing the rear tires as the front disk brakes locked up the front. They quit losing vehicles to the ditches.Of course, it's a good idea to be ready to pull the vehicle back into gear on a second's notice, to power out of a situation.

    I've made it off a mountain with a ninety degree turn at the bottom (a jeep and a station wagon failed to make the turn) by resorting to seemingly counter intuitive measures. On the way down the hill, the engine compression kept locking up the rear wheels. I had to go to higher gears as each lower gear locked the tires up. Braking threw the truck sideways, but helped a little. I'd keep braking (very lightly), go sideways, let off, straighten up and start again. Near the bottom, I put the truck in high, eased the clutch out, gave it a LITTLE gas, then cut for the inside of the corner. I pulled around the corner fine. Had it not gone so well, I was willing to even grab a bit of the ditch, rather than be thrown across the road by centrifugal force.Always be looking for the landing spot.

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  • KellyCraig commented on petercd's instructable How to Make a Negative Ion air ionizer3 months ago
    How to Make a Negative Ion air ionizer

    Somewhere, I have a sixties Popular Mechanics magazine with the plans for a transcripitor, like submarines use. It used a car coil, of that era, and stovepipe housed in a wood case. The unit was mounted vertically. As such, tapping the side of the pipe would cause all the debris attracted to the pipe to fall into a tray at the bottom. For safety, the system deactivated with the clean out door was opened.

    For the foil you recommend, I wonder if gold leafing you buy in hobby shops would work. It's cheap because it's so thin.

    I know squat about electronics, but the engineers at Bangor Sub Base used to hand me drawings [on a napkin or whatever] and I'd get to make prototypes for them. One was a capacitor forming device for high voltage caps used on the big beasts you used to see on Navy movies (the screen went "blip," "blip," "blip."To keep from frying anyone tamping with the end product, I added a micro switch that was normally on, When the door was closed, that part of the circuit was dead. With it open, it shorted the caps.Food for thought.

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  • KellyCraig commented on Scotttland's instructable Repairing Split Wood3 months ago
    Repairing Split Wood

    Sorry for being so slow to get back to you.Keep in mind, stain is, for the most part, a surface coat. Of course, much of it can get into cracks, grooves and open cells below the surface.If the wood isn't oozing oil, it shouldn't be any problem staining it. As they say, do a small test sample. Let it set the appropriate amount of time to see if it hardens. If it does, you're good to go.Water based stains aside, stains are made with linseed oil, a hardening oil. If you apply them to wood after the fact, they will act to seal the wood, at least to some degree. That will help seal moisture out and reduce moisture loss, in addition to what the oil does.Anyway, I would slather oil on the top, sides and, if practical, the bottom. Let it soak in, and let it set for a few weeks before appl...see more »Sorry for being so slow to get back to you.Keep in mind, stain is, for the most part, a surface coat. Of course, much of it can get into cracks, grooves and open cells below the surface.If the wood isn't oozing oil, it shouldn't be any problem staining it. As they say, do a small test sample. Let it set the appropriate amount of time to see if it hardens. If it does, you're good to go.Water based stains aside, stains are made with linseed oil, a hardening oil. If you apply them to wood after the fact, they will act to seal the wood, at least to some degree. That will help seal moisture out and reduce moisture loss, in addition to what the oil does.Anyway, I would slather oil on the top, sides and, if practical, the bottom. Let it soak in, and let it set for a few weeks before applying the stain. Monitor some small cracks or splits to see if they are starting to close. If they are, you might want to drag the process out. When you think you've done all you can, go to the stain. If you are ready to bag it and move on, you can wash the excess off with a good oil busting dish soap. Just let it dry for a day or two before moving ahead.Again, remember oil is a surface coat and not the most durable/wearing finish, to say the least.

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  • KellyCraig commented on mdavis19's instructable Learn how to cut circles out of glass4 months ago
    Learn how to cut circles out of glass

    On a whim I just bought about twenty pounds of lead solder, a few hundred pounds of stained glass, about eighty feet of came (the stuff they use for edges of leaded glass), five or six rolls of foil and a few tools, including a grinder and iron, for a hundred bucks. I've never dabbled in stained or leaded glass before, but I've been mildly curious about it. The deal was a great chance to test the waters. Since the deal didn't include a glass cutter, I resorted to the trusty ones in my tool box, trimmed a few pieces of scrap that were included, foiled and soldered them. Meanwhile, I bought a couple good ones (carbide wheels) off line. When the new cutters arrived, I tested them and, WOW. Night and day. Now I know not to just leave the cutters bouncing off other tools during storage....see more »On a whim I just bought about twenty pounds of lead solder, a few hundred pounds of stained glass, about eighty feet of came (the stuff they use for edges of leaded glass), five or six rolls of foil and a few tools, including a grinder and iron, for a hundred bucks. I've never dabbled in stained or leaded glass before, but I've been mildly curious about it. The deal was a great chance to test the waters. Since the deal didn't include a glass cutter, I resorted to the trusty ones in my tool box, trimmed a few pieces of scrap that were included, foiled and soldered them. Meanwhile, I bought a couple good ones (carbide wheels) off line. When the new cutters arrived, I tested them and, WOW. Night and day. Now I know not to just leave the cutters bouncing off other tools during storage. From what others say, I'll come to appreciate the carbide cutters, if I take care of them (e.g., fill and use the oil reservoirs or dip the tips in oil routinely).I'm anxious to try some circles now too. Thanks for the tips.

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  • KellyCraig commented on Scotttland's instructable Repairing Split Wood5 months ago
    Repairing Split Wood

    I buy my epoxy in the gallon and a half containers (2-1 mix) and use it for cracks. The two to one mix seems much thinner than the fifty-fifty mixes I use, so it soaks in well.For light woods, I don't color the mix. No one has yet to notice the clear fill on in large cracks on a few butternut and other light wood ornaments I've madePainters' putty works good for sealing the end of the cracks. The portion with the putty can be cut off with a miter or other means.

    For those dealing with cracked beams and such, the ideal is to address the problem before it starts. Sealing the wood doesn't work. Eventually, the wood will still lose moisture, which causes it to shrink, resulting in splits and cracks. I purchased a maple cutting board with this problem, then restored it using the approach noted below.For the butcher block, I flooded the top with mineral oil. The first bottle disappeared almost as soon as I put it on. The second went in slower, so I just added more to the spots that soaked in each time I walked past to another project. Finally, it began taking the oil in rather slowly. At that point, I slathered on a generous layer and just walked way.I ignored the top for a couple weeks. When I checked on it again, the oil had all soaked in. T...see more »For those dealing with cracked beams and such, the ideal is to address the problem before it starts. Sealing the wood doesn't work. Eventually, the wood will still lose moisture, which causes it to shrink, resulting in splits and cracks. I purchased a maple cutting board with this problem, then restored it using the approach noted below.For the butcher block, I flooded the top with mineral oil. The first bottle disappeared almost as soon as I put it on. The second went in slower, so I just added more to the spots that soaked in each time I walked past to another project. Finally, it began taking the oil in rather slowly. At that point, I slathered on a generous layer and just walked way.I ignored the top for a couple weeks. When I checked on it again, the oil had all soaked in. Too, it swelled the wood, just as water would, causing ALL the cracks and separations to close.The same approach can be taken with exterior wood surfaces. If you applied a generous first application, the obviousness of your efforts would disappear shortly. A second application would fare only a bit better. However, the third or additional coats would remain evident for years.The oil applications do not evaporate. They disappear because the oil wicks to the next dry area, deeper in the wood, until there is too little oil to wick further or the saturation has equalized throughout the wood.The main things, when using oils to replace lost moisture are:1) Use a non-hardening oil. That could be something like Chevron Shingle Oil (about ten dollars a gallon, in quantity), cheap motor oil (your mileage may vary) or mineral oil.2) To increase penetration, I'd thin it about ten or fifteen percent. You can use paint thinner, naphtha, mineral spirits or turpentine. I'd opt for the cheapest, unless I was working on a specialty project. 3) The more aggressive and patient you are in your applications, the better your results will be. You can keep adding oil without doing anything to the surface, whether a day after an application or years after. The applications will build on each other .HINT: Buy the cheapest mineral oil you can for food grade items. That would be around a buck or so a pint.NOTES: Cedar shingles that are saturated with oil, in addition to not shrinking and splitting or cracking, will remain more resilient. Normally, walking on them in the middle of the summer would cause them to break. However, if they were saturated with oil, the would remain more flexible and less prone to breakage.

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  • Inexpensive garage lights from LED strips

    Just guessing here, but I suspect heat is a lessor problem with LED's used as they are in this ible because they are so spread out.My dine room has the incandescent shaped LED's and the heat sinks get too hot to hold. On the other hand, I have strips that use as much light, but touching anywhere along the strip is a non issue.

    One of the advantages of the magnetic power supplies is, you can dim through them, instead of just on the output.When I remodeled my kitchen, LED's were still cost prohibitive, so I wired the counter lights for halogens. This meant I had 120VAC to the lights and dimming at the switch panel could only be done by adjusting the 120 volt output to the lights.Standard transformers-rectifiers are inexpensive, but you can only alter the power they put out, and not what is put into them. Magnetic transformer-rectifiers don't have this limitation. This means you can put the transformer near the load and adjust what's fed into it. Using a magnetic power supply, you still have to use a switch designed for LED's and you will pay at least three times as much for the power supply, but it does all...see more »One of the advantages of the magnetic power supplies is, you can dim through them, instead of just on the output.When I remodeled my kitchen, LED's were still cost prohibitive, so I wired the counter lights for halogens. This meant I had 120VAC to the lights and dimming at the switch panel could only be done by adjusting the 120 volt output to the lights.Standard transformers-rectifiers are inexpensive, but you can only alter the power they put out, and not what is put into them. Magnetic transformer-rectifiers don't have this limitation. This means you can put the transformer near the load and adjust what's fed into it. Using a magnetic power supply, you still have to use a switch designed for LED's and you will pay at least three times as much for the power supply, but it does allow you to install dimmable LED's on an existing systems, without tearing up walls to run a low voltage line back to the switche.

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