author
7Instructables64,364Views37CommentsNorthampton, UKJoined December 18th, 2015
I have a creative nature, whether through my work as a software developer or at home, working on one of my "projects". With three kids and a house under renovation, there's always something going on around here.

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  • Sean_Anderson commented on Sean_Anderson's instructable Laser Castle1 year ago
    Laser Castle

    Would be difficult to give an exact answer as I did this across a period of time (a few hours here and there, across a couple of weeks) and probably spent more time making prototype pieces. I guess you could (if you're efficient with your time) cut the whole lot in a couple of hours.

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  • Sean_Anderson commented on slaikie1's instructable Modular wooden Knights castle1 year ago
    Modular wooden Knights castle

    This looks awesome!! Nice work.

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  • Sean_Anderson commented on Sean_Anderson's instructable Laser Castle1 year ago
    Laser Castle

    I was using 3mm plywood and adjusted the slots to suit the material. The files "should" scale to other materials, but fine adjustments will be needed as plywood stock thicknesses are never that accurate. As I recall, the upload files were from Autocad, which I was also learning, as part of this project, so there could be flaws in that. I would suggest making a few small piece to test the slot sizes and building from there; one you have the basic dimensions, you quickly get into a flow of making the bigger pieces. Run tests with cardboard to save wasting materials and to try different designs. Hope that helps a little.

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  • Sean_Anderson commented on Sean_Anderson's instructable Laser Castle1 year ago
    Laser Castle

    Apologies; the comments from sanderson67 are actually from me; didn't realise that I had logged in with the wrong account.

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  • Sean_Anderson commented on woodskills's instructable Setting Up a Workshop1 year ago
    Setting Up a Workshop

    Buying some rope, s-hooks, pulleys and those tie-off hooks for the rope are all easy buys from eBay/DIY store and it's a really easy install, too. If you have younger kids, make sure the tie-off are too high for them and worth putting a knot in the rope (by the tie-off) so that it's less likely to slip; the tie-off point shouldn't be 'under' the bikes.

    Off cuts will always make something ... usually, they just make a big messy pile. I'm getting into the habit of throwing away the lower grade and cheaper stuff ... small pieces of ply and pine timber are so cheap t replace; obviously, if it's that's a different matter with hard and exotic woods. I'll keep stuff that has 'exceptional' grain patterns

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  • Sean_Anderson commented on woodskills's instructable Setting Up a Workshop1 year ago
    Setting Up a Workshop

    Great article and agree with the other comments!Not having the luxury of a dedicated workshop, one of my biggest issues, isn't with how I should layout the workshop (I have a plan for that) but more on how to deal with all the other 'stuff' that shares the same space (kids bikes, Christmas decorations, etc) and certainly, I would make a couple of recommendations to create space....-- Get rid of the junk and be as harsh as possible with the stuff that goes to the skip. If you haven't opened that box in the last ? months; it could probably go in the bin. How many paint cans do I have with hardly anything in? And off-cut material that "might come in handy"-- Use other storage areas in the house for storing things which must be kept but don't need to be so accessible; the garage i...

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    Great article and agree with the other comments!Not having the luxury of a dedicated workshop, one of my biggest issues, isn't with how I should layout the workshop (I have a plan for that) but more on how to deal with all the other 'stuff' that shares the same space (kids bikes, Christmas decorations, etc) and certainly, I would make a couple of recommendations to create space....-- Get rid of the junk and be as harsh as possible with the stuff that goes to the skip. If you haven't opened that box in the last ? months; it could probably go in the bin. How many paint cans do I have with hardly anything in? And off-cut material that "might come in handy"-- Use other storage areas in the house for storing things which must be kept but don't need to be so accessible; the garage is probably more convenient for storage than the roof voids, but that Christmas tree doesn't need to be in there (for example)?-- Use the 'height'; my garage at the peak is almost 3m tall and one of my first projects is to add floor-ceiling shelving; putting stuff that I don't need so often at the top. Will also be adding a pulley system to raise the bikes up - they're the biggest nuisance on the floor and the remaining height will have some cross-joists on which I can store some lesser-used materials.-- Lock the door. One of the biggest culprits for 'stuff' in the garage is (love her to bits) my Mrs ... putting a lock on the door (for the purposes of security and safety of the kids) helps to deter using the garage as the 'dumping ground'

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  • Laser Cutting Cardboard to Make a Human Skull

    Really, really, really like this!!!

    @Bales; In theory, there's no reason why you couldn't use paper printouts from this sort of thing with an exacto-knife on cardboard or a bandsaw/scrollsaw on wood. As for the setup of a laser (I am no expert with mine) I would suggest starting simple and building your skills - mine came with a pretty basic set of instructions which soon got me cutting out and etching simple shapes and designs. I've scrapped a lot of stuff, but have kept notes whenever something has worked, so that I can refer back to it and adjust the speed/power almost perfect on the first go (you can always cut/etch a small 1cm square in material as a test before unleashing a full design.

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