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  • Bike Wheel WS2811 LED Effects With Arduino

    So I tried building with Arduino 1.8.2 and got the same error about acc_update(). I added a forward declaration just before setup() and it compiles fine, give it a try. I uploaded this change to github so if you checked the code out with git, just run "git pull", if you downloaded the .zip, just re-download it.Arduino 1.8 must have changed how they generate the internal forward declarations.

    Which one specifically? Try the original FreeIMU from Fabio Varesano, it hasn't changed: http://www.varesano.net/files/FreeIMU-20121122_11...In any case I've uploaded a .zip containing FreeIMU, the WS80211 library and a .hex file I just build with Arduino 1.8.2 for anyone that needs those, unfortunately I have no way to test the .hex file until next month: http://openstreetmap.pl/balrog/wheel.zip

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  • Bike Wheel WS2811 LED Effects With Arduino

    Sorry I don't... but if you use the same version of Arduino that I was using, which must have been either 1.0.1 or 1.5.4, it should really build with not errors. Please check with a 1.5.x Arduino version and if it still fails... then we'll look at whether any of the libraries has changed maybe.

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  • Bike Wheel WS2811 LED Effects With Arduino

    Hi, not sure why you're getting this but try moving the acc_update declaration from line 637 somewhere near the top of the file, e.g. L22. But it sounds like you're either compiling outside of the Arduino IDE, or this is not the first error. Please report the top error that is printed because in programming one error will often trigger an avalanche of other, mostly unhelpful messages. Make sure you have the MPU60X0 library installed correctly.

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  • Bike wheel WS2811 LED effects with Arduino

    So that you don't have to go impossibly fast. In my experience a single spoke is not enough to get POV effect other than for tiny repeating images, two spokes might be ok depending on velocity and also on the timing precision of the board, and the LED density. The 16MHz arduino I used is rather slowish for this task. The commerical kits I've recently seen use two spokes, but have more LEDs/cm and probably a faster controller (today I'd just get one of these from aliexpress, they're cheap, waterproof and probably work)

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  • balrog-k1n commented on Gigawipf's instructable NRF24 jr module for toy quadcopters1 year ago
    NRF24 jr module for toy quadcopters

    Thanks for the instructable, got it to work with my Turnigy 9x. For the record here's my experience with the voltages needed. The PPM pin's logic one voltage varies between transmitters, so the best solution is to use a level shifter connected to the Arduino's VCC (5 or 3.3V), however if you're lazy like me it seems that for a Taranis a voltage divider made of two 10k resistors will work just fine (i.e. divide by 2), while for the Turnigy 9x you need a single 10k resistor on the PPM line, no voltage divider. On the Turnigy, dividing the voltage by 2 will prevent it from working, while connecting directly with no resistor at all it'll occasionally work and occasionally go crazy sending random values to the copter, easy to lose. I used the smallest, cheapest nRF module with the pcb an...

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    Thanks for the instructable, got it to work with my Turnigy 9x. For the record here's my experience with the voltages needed. The PPM pin's logic one voltage varies between transmitters, so the best solution is to use a level shifter connected to the Arduino's VCC (5 or 3.3V), however if you're lazy like me it seems that for a Taranis a voltage divider made of two 10k resistors will work just fine (i.e. divide by 2), while for the Turnigy 9x you need a single 10k resistor on the PPM line, no voltage divider. On the Turnigy, dividing the voltage by 2 will prevent it from working, while connecting directly with no resistor at all it'll occasionally work and occasionally go crazy sending random values to the copter, easy to lose. I used the smallest, cheapest nRF module with the pcb antenna and I get a better range than with the original Eachine H8 tx (but still short). I connected the +BAT pin directly to the arduino's RAW pin, and I power the nRF24 with the arduino's 5V connected through three diode's in series that gives me some ~3.2V.

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