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  • HOWTO Make GBR (germinated or Sprouted Brown Rice)

    Hi Emilia,It won't get sweet, like dessert sweet. It gets softer, easier to digest, and has a nice nutty, malty flavor to it, but it's still 95% brown rice flavor.There is now an easier way to make GBR. Rinse and soak at 27-30 degrees for 12-18 hours. Then take 1 cup~1 liter of the soak water, and keep it in the fridge. Drain the rest of the water, rinse the rice, and keep soaking for 1-2 more days, changing the water before it gets stinky.The next time you make GBR, rinse the rice and then begin soaking with the water you saved from last time (and add more water to cover the rice). Then save water after 12-18 hours, and keep cycling. This will give you a bioactive acidic starter that gives very good results! Any questions, just let me know!

    Emilia, can you post a link to the blog? I'd be interested in seeing it. I've been doing this for more than 10 years, including serving it in my own restaurant ;) and I've never seen it get that sweet. 17 hours is not long enough for sprouting. The nutrient level will increase and it will get softer in that time, but the flavor changes after about 1.5 days. ;)

    That method is fascinating! There is a health drink called Rejuvelac that is made in a similar way, by soaking grain and letting the water ferment. It sounds like the microorganisms in the soak water malt the grain while baking. Interesting! But, this malting process doesn't happen with the rice. I usually let my rice soak as long as possible before it gets stinky, so there are lots of microorganisms but it doesn't rot. But then the rice is boiled, so they are killed, poor microorganisms XD If you heat the rice in the same way as your baking bread, perhaps there would be a similar effect... you could try it! The only other way I know to convert rice's starches to sugars is to make koji, but that's a very different process.

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