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  • corradini commented on mikeasaurus's instructable gentleman's ski poles6 days ago
    gentleman's ski poles

    A) I LOVE the concept, and nifty Making skills. I've been skiing for 40+ years; old-skool was "Bota Bags", the 'hip-flask of skiers' if I can coin a phrase.B) Saw the comments below on safety of the vinyl -- funny timing, as I was just commenting on another Inst'ble about using "vinyl" (=PVC) gutters for hydroponic gardening, which I think is just fine. But: I'm gonna have to disagree, here.I won't/can't say this is 'unsafe' -- but it concerns me, and I wouldn't do it. (Just FYI, I have a patent in hydrocarbon chemistry and some relevant knowledge.) Here's the point: phthalates are used as plasticizers in PVCs to make them flexible. This vinyl is clearly (ahem) quite flexible. And while polar solvents (i.e. water) don't tend to leach phthalates (which are not bound, ...see more »A) I LOVE the concept, and nifty Making skills. I've been skiing for 40+ years; old-skool was "Bota Bags", the 'hip-flask of skiers' if I can coin a phrase.B) Saw the comments below on safety of the vinyl -- funny timing, as I was just commenting on another Inst'ble about using "vinyl" (=PVC) gutters for hydroponic gardening, which I think is just fine. But: I'm gonna have to disagree, here.I won't/can't say this is 'unsafe' -- but it concerns me, and I wouldn't do it. (Just FYI, I have a patent in hydrocarbon chemistry and some relevant knowledge.) Here's the point: phthalates are used as plasticizers in PVCs to make them flexible. This vinyl is clearly (ahem) quite flexible. And while polar solvents (i.e. water) don't tend to leach phthalates (which are not bound, that's important) from PVC -- apparently alcohols are more efficient at that. Link to actual science journal article below. I have no axe to grind (or commercial/employment interest) about phthalates, but they are possibly linked to estrogen-like effects in mammals, which is why we don't use BPA in baby bottles any more, for example.And which makes the name "Gentleman's (Ski) Poles" somewhat amusing, potentially. Or potently. Or not-potently.... >;-) There's just way too much meat in there - oh, dang, there I go again - to chuckle about.-------------------------I think it'd just be far easier and possibly significantly safer to just plug the bottom of a ski pole so that the libation won't leak out, and use the crafty shampoo-bottle-thread solution from this Inst'ble at the top. Ski poles are aluminum and, well, I'm pretty sure beer cans are too, so probably safe enough, after a few good rinses just for fun. I'd imagine that pouring in some food-grade silicone rubber would work just fine - better yet, just pull off the ski-pole tip and squeeze in a bunch of clear silicone sealant from the bottom; let it cure for a long time, more rinses. Added bonus: more volume. :-)--------------------------P. Chatonnet, S. Boutou, A. Plana. Contamination of wines and spirits by phthalates: types of contaminants present, contamination sources and means of prevention. Food Additives & Contaminants: Part A, 2014; 1 DOI: 10.1080/19440049.2014.941947

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  • corradini commented on seamster's instructable Impossible Nail in Wooden Block6 days ago
    Impossible Nail in Wooden Block

    I've got a pretty good amateur woodworking & metal shop (including some CNC stuff) - and I've done a lot of fabricating parts that included some threading & tapping. And I have a set of rather tiny taps & dies, too, probably small enough to do that w/ a - fairly large - nail.That said - I think you're way underestimating the difficulty of machining that. To drill the hole - well, you could use a lathe, but it'd be a trick to chuck the nail with its head, unless the jaws on your 3-jaw chuck were short enough, and your (small) lathe was really, really well-aligned. (And a few other inevitable gremlins.) Or you might be able to use a mill, but again the setup and precision would be crucial. And then there's the tapping/threading ops on each side - we're down to almost watchmaki...see more »I've got a pretty good amateur woodworking & metal shop (including some CNC stuff) - and I've done a lot of fabricating parts that included some threading & tapping. And I have a set of rather tiny taps & dies, too, probably small enough to do that w/ a - fairly large - nail.That said - I think you're way underestimating the difficulty of machining that. To drill the hole - well, you could use a lathe, but it'd be a trick to chuck the nail with its head, unless the jaws on your 3-jaw chuck were short enough, and your (small) lathe was really, really well-aligned. (And a few other inevitable gremlins.) Or you might be able to use a mill, but again the setup and precision would be crucial. And then there's the tapping/threading ops on each side - we're down to almost watchmaking precision if you want the nail to be straight, the threads to not cut through the sides, etc. etc. etc.It'd actually be a lot easier to just drill a hole in each half and stick a pin in it with some good epoxy. You'd have to epoxy it anyhow - otherwise someone could just unscrew the threaded nail - why bother with threads? Another easier solution might be to just do a half-lap joint (nah, would probably break under stress), or an epoxied "X" joint you could cut with a dremel disc or slitting saw? Remember the joint will be hidden. Heck, you could possibly even just use a thin sleeve rather than a pin - no concentricity issues with the hole drilling.But wait one sec, here - all these solutions, going back to Cleareye10.'s original suggestion, rely on a 90° adapter that fits into the big holes, in order to drill the center hole for the nail. The OP's holes are 2½"Ø - my right-angle drill head (a Milescraft Drill90) is way larger. Ditto the right-angle drills from Ryobi, Milwaukee, Bosch, and DeWalt, which are smaller but still too large. Let's just go back to the original idea: simply breaking & re-gluing the wood is WAY EASIER. And works. Occam's Razor, sorta - why pick a much harder way to do something, when it doesn't really get you anything more?

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  • corradini commented on LinkG4's instructable Aquaponics Vertical Garden6 days ago
    Aquaponics Vertical Garden

    hreid - excellent points. (Wish I'd read farther down before posting my long bit above responding to timzebo.) - Absolutely agree on alumin(i)um and galv'd steel. Aluminum has virtually no biological role despite being the 3rd most common element on Earth! After a few billion years for life to figure out something to do with Al, it's decided not to. It doesn't seem to be super-toxic to humans (otherwise we'd skip beer & soda cans - the protective formation of Al2O3 is helpful there), but you're right that it's quite reactive in acidic environments and it's probably not smart to eat a lot of whatever you get from that. (I will not get into the Alzh. debate.) And while Zn is biologically essential, a whole lot of it ain't good.- That said, your points on rigid PVC, the rat ≠ human ...see more »hreid - excellent points. (Wish I'd read farther down before posting my long bit above responding to timzebo.) - Absolutely agree on alumin(i)um and galv'd steel. Aluminum has virtually no biological role despite being the 3rd most common element on Earth! After a few billion years for life to figure out something to do with Al, it's decided not to. It doesn't seem to be super-toxic to humans (otherwise we'd skip beer & soda cans - the protective formation of Al2O3 is helpful there), but you're right that it's quite reactive in acidic environments and it's probably not smart to eat a lot of whatever you get from that. (I will not get into the Alzh. debate.) And while Zn is biologically essential, a whole lot of it ain't good.- That said, your points on rigid PVC, the rat ≠ human biology issue (fully agree!), and the monomer issue are (ahem) dead on. (Bows.)

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  • Ink Removal From Soda Cans

    I gotta say, even as an American, that I agree with you on the aluminium/aluminum thing. (And let's not get into the metric mess - there are 3 countries on earth that don't use metric, and the other 2 are Myanmar and Liberia. 'Nuff said.)Let's look at a few metals on the PTotE: titanium, chromium, sodium, lithium, magnesium, vanadium, zirconium, gallium, germanium, indium, selenium, tellurium, hafnium, yttrium, etc. Now, you can make all kinds of arguments against that spelling convention, in 2 categories: (1) old Latin stuff like "aurum" (gold), "argentum" (silver), "cuprum" (copper), "ferrum" (iron) -- that's where we get Au, Ag, Cu, Fe.... And (2) even still on the PT we have molybdenum, tantalum, lanthanum, and maybe a couple of others that've...see more »I gotta say, even as an American, that I agree with you on the aluminium/aluminum thing. (And let's not get into the metric mess - there are 3 countries on earth that don't use metric, and the other 2 are Myanmar and Liberia. 'Nuff said.)Let's look at a few metals on the PTotE: titanium, chromium, sodium, lithium, magnesium, vanadium, zirconium, gallium, germanium, indium, selenium, tellurium, hafnium, yttrium, etc. Now, you can make all kinds of arguments against that spelling convention, in 2 categories: (1) old Latin stuff like "aurum" (gold), "argentum" (silver), "cuprum" (copper), "ferrum" (iron) -- that's where we get Au, Ag, Cu, Fe.... And (2) even still on the PT we have molybdenum, tantalum, lanthanum, and maybe a couple of others that've survived.That said - "-ium" seems to've won out, not just in the table for metals generally, but in worldwide usage for Al_____um. It's a little eccentric in the US to use the "i" form of Al, but I DO use it when corresponding with a global audience. :-)

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  • corradini commented on TheHomebrewGuru's instructable Fusion Jr. Home Energy Reactor3 months ago
    Fusion Jr. Home Energy Reactor

    You mean Seebeck - which is exactly the inverse (but basically the same thing) of the Peltier. Look them both up on Wikipedia.

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  • corradini commented on JessaG1's instructable Simple Hydroponic Strawberries 3 months ago
    Simple Hydroponic Strawberries

    I don't mean to criticize, but I don't understand your statement that strawberries "are happy with" only water. Plants need nutrients to grow - this goes beyond even botany to basic thermodynamics! >;-) Putting it simply: you can't make a strawberry out of water, no matter how good the setup. A strawberry has mass; that mass comes from somewhere, and it's composed *mostly* (but not totally) of "CHON": carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen. O2 can come from atmosphere (remember photosynthesis?), but plants do NOT get nitrogen from air; it has to come from N2 compounds, through the roots. They also need phosphorous and potassium (hence the "NPK" ratios on fertilizer labels). And trace minerals. This is why hydroponics 'food'/nutrients are supplied. Saying...see more »I don't mean to criticize, but I don't understand your statement that strawberries "are happy with" only water. Plants need nutrients to grow - this goes beyond even botany to basic thermodynamics! >;-) Putting it simply: you can't make a strawberry out of water, no matter how good the setup. A strawberry has mass; that mass comes from somewhere, and it's composed *mostly* (but not totally) of "CHON": carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen. O2 can come from atmosphere (remember photosynthesis?), but plants do NOT get nitrogen from air; it has to come from N2 compounds, through the roots. They also need phosphorous and potassium (hence the "NPK" ratios on fertilizer labels). And trace minerals. This is why hydroponics 'food'/nutrients are supplied. Saying you don't need to feed strawberries, or any other hydroponics crop, is provably false (and silly, but I'm being polite).

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  • corradini followed Audio channel 9 months ago
  • 3D home printer with Arduino

    Aha - thought so. For English readers - indeed, it is a stainless-steel cup used for making custard, or 'flan'. :-) Muchisima gracias, se~nor!

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  • 3D home printer with Arduino

    Que es "the custard rate" en espanol? No se tradujo también en Inglés - que suena como "natillas-tasa", cuando pienso que quería decir "taza" tal vez?(If so, for English readers, I think he means basically "measuring cup" - probably a Google Translate issue... :-)

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  • corradini followed Arduino channel 9 months ago
  •  Weather Forecasting and Interfacing DHT11  Sensor With Mediatek Linkitone Board

    Am I missing something? Like: the header file and code?

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  • corradini followed awilson7510 months ago