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10Instructables162,030Views21CommentsTexasJoined May 27th, 2015
These Arduinos are driving me up the wall.

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  • Bluetooth Serial Adapter for Pro Mini

    I have not found it a problem to have the connections near the antenna. In theory, it may be a problem if you are looking at getting the absolute maximum range out of the module.These cheap bluetooth modules can be used at any typical speed, but they must be programmed to use one specific speed between the module and the Arduino, and manually reprogrammed each time you want to use a different speed. So, the speed your sketches work with must be the same as the speed the bootloader works with, if you want to use the bluetooth for both programming and then immediate interaction with your sketch via the serial monitor. For example, if you are programming a typical 16 MHz Pro Mini that has a 57600 BPS bootloader, and your sketch interacts with you at 57600 also, you will find this ada...

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    I have not found it a problem to have the connections near the antenna. In theory, it may be a problem if you are looking at getting the absolute maximum range out of the module.These cheap bluetooth modules can be used at any typical speed, but they must be programmed to use one specific speed between the module and the Arduino, and manually reprogrammed each time you want to use a different speed. So, the speed your sketches work with must be the same as the speed the bootloader works with, if you want to use the bluetooth for both programming and then immediate interaction with your sketch via the serial monitor. For example, if you are programming a typical 16 MHz Pro Mini that has a 57600 BPS bootloader, and your sketch interacts with you at 57600 also, you will find this adapter is very much like using a wired serial adapter. You will notice it does not matter what speed you set the computer's comm port to in the serial monitor, because that speed is only for communication between your computer and it's built in bluetooth adapter. The speed you set your computer's comm port to is really not used at all, since the computer's bluetooth adapter should be using an internal USB connection and only partially emulating a serial port. The speed in that part of the communication between the computer and its bluetooth adapter, and also over the air between bluetooth modules happens as fast as possible and at rates much higher than typical serial speeds. For dynamic speed change that changes at the Arduino end when you change the speed of the port on your computer, you would need a fancier and more expensive bluetooth module such as an Adafruit Bluefruit module.

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  • dmjlambert commented on dmjlambert's instructable HV Rescue Simple2 months ago
    HV Rescue Simple

    Yes, at the bottom of step 1 is the download of zip file with the sketch and schematic.

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  • Arduino Nano ATmega238P/CH340G V3.0 PCB Layout

    Yes, it looks like you found a mistake. That is not my schematic, it is a link on the Internet to somebody's blog. That is a good thing to be aware of, thanks for pointing it out.

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  • dmjlambert commented on dmjlambert's instructable HV Rescue Simple6 months ago
    HV Rescue Simple

    I have not yet programmed an SMD chip with HV programming, so I don't have experience to guide you. Besides just freeing up the reset lead on the chip, you may also need to remove the connection to the crystal, because I recall that one of the connections you need to make from the programmer to the chip is one of the XTAL pins. You should be able to put a soldering iron on the extra pins you need that are not already available around the perimeter of the board and lift the pin off the trace by inserting an X-acto knife under the pin and lift it carefully. Then solder a flying lead onto that pin. That is a wire that you solder directly to the pin of the chip. I believe you are in for some SMD work and may need a soldering iron with a sharp tip, a magnifying glass, and a steady ...

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    I have not yet programmed an SMD chip with HV programming, so I don't have experience to guide you. Besides just freeing up the reset lead on the chip, you may also need to remove the connection to the crystal, because I recall that one of the connections you need to make from the programmer to the chip is one of the XTAL pins. You should be able to put a soldering iron on the extra pins you need that are not already available around the perimeter of the board and lift the pin off the trace by inserting an X-acto knife under the pin and lift it carefully. Then solder a flying lead onto that pin. That is a wire that you solder directly to the pin of the chip. I believe you are in for some SMD work and may need a soldering iron with a sharp tip, a magnifying glass, and a steady hand.

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  • How to Restore the Arduino UNO R3 ATmega16U2 Firmware Using the Arduino IDE

    This was written with 1.6.5 or 1.6.6 The instructable is now outdated, so I may just delete it.

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  • How to unlock Digispark ATtiny85 and convert it to a Trinket

    I just downloaded the zip file and in it is the schematic. I was able to zoom the schematic to any size with my favorite image editing program. I think you just need to zoom in if it is too small.

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  • How to unlock Digispark ATtiny85 and convert it to a Trinket

    I think that is the case, you don't need a HV programmer for the extended fuse because nothing about the extended fuse could cause the chip to be non-programmable via ISP. I did not study this programmer code in detail or alter it, it is from a different blog and I just adapted the schematic a little bit to work with Digispark boards. I have another Instructable https://www.instructables.com/id/HV-Rescue-Simple/ that is based on Jeff Keyzer's version 2 of his HV Rescue Shield. I simplified the hardware to make it breadboard-based with fewer components, and enhanced the sketch to work with most Arduinos and give it a menu with control of the fuse values.

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  • How to unlock Digispark ATtiny85 and convert it to a Trinket

    I don't think I agree with using the word "wrong." Those are my preferred fuse values. The differences between those and what the Digispark comes set with are brown out detection, EESAVE, and start up time. Digispark's official values are on this page: http://digistump.com/wiki/digispark/tutorials/programming

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  • How to unlock Digispark ATtiny85 and convert it to a Trinket

    I think the fuse settings and the core you use when you compile a sketch for it determine how fast the processor runs. It sounds like your sketch is compiled for 16MHz but your processor is actually running at 1MHz if you are noticing that speed difference. If you have put the Micronucleus bootloader back onto it and are programming it as a Digispark, then you should be able to find information on the Digispark website or wiki about speeds. If you have put the Trinket bootloader on it and are programming it as a Trinket, you should be able to find information in Adafruit's tutorials or forums about that. There are a variety of cores you can use to add on to the Arduino IDE to program plain ATtiny85's using an ISP programmer, and most of those will involve using the Burn Bootloa...

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    I think the fuse settings and the core you use when you compile a sketch for it determine how fast the processor runs. It sounds like your sketch is compiled for 16MHz but your processor is actually running at 1MHz if you are noticing that speed difference. If you have put the Micronucleus bootloader back onto it and are programming it as a Digispark, then you should be able to find information on the Digispark website or wiki about speeds. If you have put the Trinket bootloader on it and are programming it as a Trinket, you should be able to find information in Adafruit's tutorials or forums about that. There are a variety of cores you can use to add on to the Arduino IDE to program plain ATtiny85's using an ISP programmer, and most of those will involve using the Burn Bootloader function of the IDE to set the fuses to the appropriate values. Help for using those cores could probably be found at the arduino.cc website in the Microcontrollers section of the forum.

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  • Bluetooth Serial Adapter for Pro Mini

    Yes, I recommend posting your question on the arduino.cc forum, it looks like the section "Networking, Protocols, and Devices" would be appropriate. Include information such as how you have each pin wired, include a diagram (hand drawn is fine), include a photo of your Pro Mini and the HC-05 module, and include information about how you configured the HC-05 when you were in AT mode and setting it up. Also confirm the Pro Mini accepts uploads when used with a regular wired FTDI adapter.

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