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  • emorning commented on JON-A-TRON's instructable 3D Printed Self-Watering Planter11 months ago
    3D Printed Self-Watering Planter

    Very nice design.I grow some of my house plants in a pot similar to this (actually, just a regular pot and a deep plastic saucer underneath) using nothing but perlite and vermiculite (3 parts perlite, 1 part vermiculite). No soil, the plants get all the nutrients they need from the fertilizer I add to the water. My plants seem to prefer it to soil, I think it's because the roots can always get all the oxygen they want. I did take the time to figure out how much vinegar to add to my watering can to make sure the pH of my water is right around 6, that makes a difference.

    I just use Miracle Grow. I use half the recommended amount because I think I've killed plants by using too much. I have a couple of different types of pothos, a fiddle leaf fig, a Z plant, and some succulents in perlite. All easy to grow plants. All at least 6 months old. All very happy. These plants are in pots filled with perlite and vermiculite mixture. Underneath each pot is a plastic saucer that is 4 inches deep and a couple of inches wider than the pot. So in principle I think my pots work like yours, a reservoir of water wicks up to the 'soil' in the pot. I water often, every few days. I just water through the top of the pot until the saucer is almost full. I pay no attention to how wet or dry the perlite is, I just water until the saucer is full. I give no thought to wh...see more »I just use Miracle Grow. I use half the recommended amount because I think I've killed plants by using too much. I have a couple of different types of pothos, a fiddle leaf fig, a Z plant, and some succulents in perlite. All easy to grow plants. All at least 6 months old. All very happy. These plants are in pots filled with perlite and vermiculite mixture. Underneath each pot is a plastic saucer that is 4 inches deep and a couple of inches wider than the pot. So in principle I think my pots work like yours, a reservoir of water wicks up to the 'soil' in the pot. I water often, every few days. I just water through the top of the pot until the saucer is almost full. I pay no attention to how wet or dry the perlite is, I just water until the saucer is full. I give no thought to when I last watered a plant.I tried perlite because I read on the Internet that you don't have to worry about over watering because so much oxygen can permeate through the perlite to the roots. Root rot isn't caused by too much water, its caused by lack of oxygen. Soil is much more compact than perlite so it doesn't allow nearly as much oxygen to get to the roots, especially when it's wet. Also, about a year ago I moved into a new house in a different town. I bought some new plants and they were very unhappy, a couple died. Then I read about the importance of pH to plants. If pH is too wrong then plants cant absorb nutrients. I bought a pH testing kit (cheap) and discovered that the water in my town is very alkaline (pH over 9). Using the pH kit I figured out how much acid I need to add to the water to get pH around 6 (where plants like it). pH seems to be a big deal, this made a big difference.Anyway, based on my experience I'm sure your pot should work just fine for me. I have a homemade RepRap Prusa. I'll even get a fern for this :-).

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