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  • ironsmiter commented on mrpropmaster's instructable Restoring an Axe3 days ago
    Restoring an Axe

    only a good solution, if you are also replacing the handle.We know what happens if you soak a wood handle overnight in ANYTHING liquid... loose handle immenint.

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  • ironsmiter commented on MESSv1's instructable how to make piadina bread2 weeks ago
    how to make piadina bread

    Is it closer to a tortilla or closer to naan? Or neither, and more like a thin crust pizza without toppings?

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  • Unexpected result during fire resistance test (final test)

    perlite and vermiculite can both be found pretty darn easy, even in small towns. you just have to know where to look.The gardening center of even a tiny hardware store should have 5lb bags of both. ANY greenhouse type store will have both, and almost any building center will at least have perlite.Just be aware that it will make a lighter product with better insulating qualities, but it will NOT raise the temperature resistance of your formula.Personally, I use an almost 50/50 mixture of kaolin and kyanite, and then add 'busted crucible and firebrick grog" to the mix. Regular grog is too variable for my taste. I have successfully melted small batched of iron using my recipe. You do need to fire the vessel(like any other high temperature ceramic vessel) before putting it into service...see more »perlite and vermiculite can both be found pretty darn easy, even in small towns. you just have to know where to look.The gardening center of even a tiny hardware store should have 5lb bags of both. ANY greenhouse type store will have both, and almost any building center will at least have perlite.Just be aware that it will make a lighter product with better insulating qualities, but it will NOT raise the temperature resistance of your formula.Personally, I use an almost 50/50 mixture of kaolin and kyanite, and then add 'busted crucible and firebrick grog" to the mix. Regular grog is too variable for my taste. I have successfully melted small batched of iron using my recipe. You do need to fire the vessel(like any other high temperature ceramic vessel) before putting it into service. And before each use, I thoroughly dry it next to the glory hole, so that any absorbed moisture from the evening before doesn't explode my precious clay metal melters. If you intend to do iron though, best off just getting a good graphite crucible or 4. For aluminium, a small, deep cast iron pot with a clay wash works as well or better than ceramic crucibles. Bronze requires the same basic set up as iron. Just my two cents.

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  • ironsmiter commented on dpmakestuff's instructable Make It - Secret Compartment Frame1 month ago
    Make It - Secret Compartment Frame

    Awesome job cutting that brass bar stock. my cuts never come out that clean.You must sharpen your knife more often than I do. And a I love the part where you properly lubricate your framing square before every use too.

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  • ironsmiter commented on ViciousBaitDye's instructable Dye Live Bait Fish1 month ago
    Dye Live Bait Fish

    with the old feeder goldfish, wasn't really a problem, as they weren't too smart. Any that got loose were quickly eaten by the sport fish. They also take a fair bit of time to grow large enough to be a problem...Now, take your current asian carp and you have a problem. Faster growing, 'smarter', and much more aggressive. they can quickly decimate a local diverse fish population.

    I wonder what the long term effects are... gold fish are pretty hardy, but breathing that stuff may not be good for them. less of a problem in bait fish. more of an issue for pets.Presumably, after a few weeks, they would return to their normal color.

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  • ironsmiter commented on FireSword's instructable External Tablet Charger1 month ago
    External Tablet Charger

    I wonder if you put the charge circuit in parallel with the old circuit...It SHOULD continue to register a charged battery just like normal. If not, perhaps a set of diodes on the charge circuit lines would prevent residual voltage bleeding, and give accurate battery monitoring back? I THINK most tablets monitor actual battery voltage, so should read properly once calibrated with a full charge/discharge/charge cycle. As long as none of the monitoring traces have been damaged.One of the circuit gurus may have a different opinion. but it is a place to start, if you want to try on the next fix.

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  • ironsmiter commented on joshr35's instructable Hand Forged Rose1 month ago
    Hand Forged Rose

    It would take some more time and skill, but you could split the leaves off the stem, and forge them out, instead of welding on. Slightly widen the spot for the leaf, get it nice and hot(yellow, at least, for mild steel), and use a sharp hot chisel. Once split , and bent at 90, forge it out, then bend into a more natural curve.Completely agree that forge welding the finished leaf on, while doable, could be very tricky to get the temperatures right on both pieces.The painted version is ... interesting. Depends on what you like better, I guess. I think I like the 'pure' metal look better, but what do I know, eh?

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  • ironsmiter commented on treii28's instructable Rotating Turbine fire pit cover2 months ago
    Rotating Turbine fire pit cover

    I think my forge / BBQ / Standing Firepit now needs a pretty new upgrade.Thanks for the inspiration. Hopefully the SO doesn't force me to make seasonal spinners.

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  • ironsmiter commented on DuralM's instructable Brass Casting - Got Nice Ingot2 months ago
    Brass Casting - Got Nice Ingot

    I would reach out to the Flordia Artist Blacksmith Association.( http://blacksmithing.org/ )I am sure they could help you out with starter coal, or a solid lead on where to buy it. Personally, even being from Illinois (lots of coal here, not all smithing grade though), It's hard to beat some of the internet pricing for 50lb bags of coal. When i take a trip near the mines, I swing in and pick up a couple hundred pounds, But if I am running low, amazon is just a click away, and a heck of a lot faster than planning a long vacation weekend

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  • Charcoal Grill Forge: Become a blacksmith on the cheap

    If you really need to get started "dirt cheap" then that is a place to save. Literally, DIRT. ANY commercial refractory is going to cost a chunk of change. Dirt is usually free. and high-clay dirt is even better. Just mix it a little moist, so that it clumps, and packs well... then jam it in there.1) Yes, it will dry and crack.2) No, it is not as good as refractory3) Yes, it will work just fine, till you have a chance to upgrade.Almost any cracking will be filled with dust from your fuel, and that stuff is a pretty good insulator also. Just remember, "Professional" forges are basically cast iron bowls, so the insulation for your BBQ is only "needed" for high temperature operation (like forge welding, where the insulation concentrates the heat) and to keep t...see more »If you really need to get started "dirt cheap" then that is a place to save. Literally, DIRT. ANY commercial refractory is going to cost a chunk of change. Dirt is usually free. and high-clay dirt is even better. Just mix it a little moist, so that it clumps, and packs well... then jam it in there.1) Yes, it will dry and crack.2) No, it is not as good as refractory3) Yes, it will work just fine, till you have a chance to upgrade.Almost any cracking will be filled with dust from your fuel, and that stuff is a pretty good insulator also. Just remember, "Professional" forges are basically cast iron bowls, so the insulation for your BBQ is only "needed" for high temperature operation (like forge welding, where the insulation concentrates the heat) and to keep the thin steel from oxidizing through (rust or burn, it's just a matter of time and speed).For fuel, you can actually get some reasonable work done using hardwood chunks! Hardwood charcoal is better(less smoke and impurities grunging up your steel). BBQ briquettes WILL work, if it is your only fuel, but don't expect forging to be easy or clean. And forge welding is pretty much right out the window.As to lighting the fire... I was taught to use the newspaper. Two to three sheets crumpled up, lit on the edge, buried in coal, then turn the blower on. If you have pre-made coke from your last forge session, you can cut that down to a half sheet of newspaper ;-)Just remember, the first blacksmiths likely used campfires and rocks to beat metals into compliance. Any more modern technology you use just gives you a head start!

    If you really need to get started "dirt cheap" then that is a place to save. Literally, DIRT. ANY commercial refractory is going to cost a chunk of change. Dirt is usually free. and high-clay dirt is even better. Just mix it a little moist, so that it clumps, and packs well... then jam it in there.1) Yes, it will dry and crack.2) No, it is not as good as refractory3) Yes, it will work just fine, till you have a chance to upgrade.Almost any cracking will be filled with dust from your fuel, and that stuff is a pretty good insulator also. Just remember, "Professional" forges are basically cast iron bowls, so the insulation for your BBQ is only "needed" for high temperature operation (like forge welding, where the insulation concentrates the heat) and to keep t...see more »If you really need to get started "dirt cheap" then that is a place to save. Literally, DIRT. ANY commercial refractory is going to cost a chunk of change. Dirt is usually free. and high-clay dirt is even better. Just mix it a little moist, so that it clumps, and packs well... then jam it in there.1) Yes, it will dry and crack.2) No, it is not as good as refractory3) Yes, it will work just fine, till you have a chance to upgrade.Almost any cracking will be filled with dust from your fuel, and that stuff is a pretty good insulator also. Just remember, "Professional" forges are basically cast iron bowls, so the insulation for your BBQ is only "needed" for high temperature operation (like forge welding, where the insulation concentrates the heat) and to keep the thin steel from oxidizing through (rust or burn, it's just a matter of time and speed).For fuel, you can actually get some reasonable work done using hardwood chunks! Hardwood charcoal is better(less smoke and impurities grunging up your steel). BBQ briquettes WILL work, if it is your only fuel, but don't expect forging to be easy or clean. And forge welding is pretty much right out the window.As to lighting the fire... I was taught to use the newspaper. Two to three sheets crumpled up, lit on the edge, buried in coal, then turn the blower on. If you have pre-made coke from your last forge session, you can cut that down to a half sheet of newspaper ;-)Just remember, the first blacksmiths likely used campfires and rocks to beat metals into compliance. Any more modern technology you use just gives you a head start!Video series of taking dirt and firewood, turning more dirt into iron, then forging a weapon of war!

    If you really need to get started "dirt cheap" then that is a place to save.Literally, DIRT. ANY commercial refractory is going to cost a chunk of change.Dirt is usually free. and high-clay dirt is even better. Just mix it a little moist, so that it clumps, and packs well... then jam it in there. 1) Yes, it will dry and crack.2) No, it is not as good as refractory3) Yes, it will work just fine, till you have a chance to upgrade.Almost any cracking will be filled with dust from your fuel, and that stuff is a pretty good insulator also. Just remember, "Professional" forges are basically cast iron bowls, so the insulation for your BBQ is only "needed" for high temperature operation (like forge welding, where the insulation concentrates the heat) and to keep th...see more »If you really need to get started "dirt cheap" then that is a place to save.Literally, DIRT. ANY commercial refractory is going to cost a chunk of change.Dirt is usually free. and high-clay dirt is even better. Just mix it a little moist, so that it clumps, and packs well... then jam it in there. 1) Yes, it will dry and crack.2) No, it is not as good as refractory3) Yes, it will work just fine, till you have a chance to upgrade.Almost any cracking will be filled with dust from your fuel, and that stuff is a pretty good insulator also. Just remember, "Professional" forges are basically cast iron bowls, so the insulation for your BBQ is only "needed" for high temperature operation (like forge welding, where the insulation concentrates the heat) and to keep the thin steel from oxidizing through (rust or burn, it's just a matter of time and speed).For fuel, you can actually get some reasonable work done using hardwood chunks!Hardwood charcoal is better(less smoke and impurities grunging up your steel). BBQ briquettes WILL work, if it is your only fuel, but don't expect forging to be easy or clean. And forge welding is pretty much right out the window.As to lighting the fire... I was taught to use the newspaper. Two to three sheets crumpled up, lit on the edge, buried in coal, then turn the blower on. If you have pre-made coke from your last forge session, you can cut that down to a half sheet of newspaper ;-)Just remember, the first blacksmiths likely used campfires and rocks to beat metals into compliance. Any more modern technology you use just gives you a head start!This is video 1 in a series of 'ancient' people using dirt and firewood to turn other dirt into an iron and forge spear head ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y_mTgHj6M1Q )

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  • Fixing a old broken computer cooling fan with a new DC Motor

    Rough up the surface around the broken fan blade with a file, or sandpaper.clean it really well.JB weld, or Bondic will make for a very securely fastened balancer. It won't blow as well, with the missing blade, but it should let you run at full speed without the fan tearing itself apart, or killing the bearings.

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  • ironsmiter commented on gpiwowar's instructable Restore a Cast Iron Frying Pan4 months ago
    Restore a Cast Iron Frying Pan

    MY final step before seasoning, is to stick my cast iron in a turkey fryer, and boil it for a half hour or so. Any soap that made it into the metal will surely come loose, along with the last bits of iron dust, and any remaining bio material. For "lesser" cleaning, I just stick it on the stove top, fill with water, and simmer. works pretty darn well.For seasoning, my latest try is coconut oil (been using it for all my cooking lately). Works pretty well, and doesn't seem to have made a negative taste impact to anything I've cooked.But Lodge has a specific seasoning spray they sell. 100% canola oil. And cast iron is what they do. So, if you don't want to experiment, follow the experts, and use canola.

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  • Banana Halwa : A Sweet Dish Made From Over Ripe Bananas

    seems like a lot of sugar for an already sweet banana might try subbing coconut flour for half the sugar

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  • ironsmiter commented on Tuan_Hoang's instructable Weekend project: A forest dragon5 months ago
    Weekend project: A forest dragon

    The texturing on that is AMAZING!Did you do any kind of sealing or preservative? Or are you going to let the brass do it's thing and go verdigris and shiny brass where people will be petting it? (think like any statue of Abraham Lincoln, or horses nuts in a public park sculpture)

    Sorry, the link should have been to the NUMBER ONE forest dragon. correct link belowhttp://furukawa21.jp/craftclub/craftinfo/%E3%83%89...

    I THINK the direct link to the page is here http://furukawa21.jp/craftclub/craftinfo/%E3%83%89...to save you time, scrolling through translated pages of linked papercraft.To quote from the site "Copyright basically paper belong to Furukawa and studio nozzle. Customers secondary processing in the category of personal enjoyment, the public, etc. is free. However, if you want to use as follows: Please note. ○ companies, organizations to be used for commercial purposes please refrain. ○ (such as catalogs, flyers, business cards) secondary processing for commercial purposes, please contact our regard, such as manufacturing and sales."For now, the pattern is a freely linked download.

    sorry, this one is actually the number ONE forest dragon.http://furukawa21.jp/craftclub/craftinfo/%E3%83%89%E3%83%A9%E3%82%B4%E3%83%B3%E3%81%AE%E5%9E%8B%E7%B4%99no-1_forestdragon/

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  • ironsmiter commented on ralphzoontjens's instructable 3D Printable Designer Sunglasses5 months ago
    3D Printable Designer Sunglasses

    Keep us up to date on the durability of the integrated hinge design!For "softer nose pads", stop by the local optical shop. Usually, they should have both aftermarket replacement pads which you could clip off the attachment method and adhere them to the frame, or possibly use one of the "no slip silicon nose pad" pads used to "fix" plastic frames for people with nose fitment issues. If you find a good independent optical shop, you may be able to have them fit nose pad arms to the frame (though they will need to know the material properties of your printer filament to even try). It is pretty easily done with acetate frames, but with your printed frames, it would be an experiment.Shaping over an open flame is.... risky. A hot air gun, diffused, and set at a d...see more »Keep us up to date on the durability of the integrated hinge design!For "softer nose pads", stop by the local optical shop. Usually, they should have both aftermarket replacement pads which you could clip off the attachment method and adhere them to the frame, or possibly use one of the "no slip silicon nose pad" pads used to "fix" plastic frames for people with nose fitment issues. If you find a good independent optical shop, you may be able to have them fit nose pad arms to the frame (though they will need to know the material properties of your printer filament to even try). It is pretty easily done with acetate frames, but with your printed frames, it would be an experiment.Shaping over an open flame is.... risky. A hot air gun, diffused, and set at a distance is much better. Better still, put a small pan of salt on a hot plate, and set the temperature to "Just right, Goldilocks", and use that to heat the frame for bending. Normal temperatures are between 150F and 300F, but without the data on your feed stock, you should start at the low end, and work your way up. You know it was too hot, or in for too long when your frame takes on little dented textures matching the shape of salt crystals ;-) Maybe print out a test piece, and use that to calibrate your temperature before sacrificing your finished frames.

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