loading
85Comments

Tell us about yourself!

Complete Your Profile
  • jaxboy completed the lesson You Stuck With It! in the class Glue Class1 week ago
  • Power in the Apocalypse (How to build a Wood-Gasifier)

    On the History channel, the series "Mountain Men", Eustace in the mountains of North Carolina ran his truck with a gasifier, and it enabled him to drive up some fairly steep hills carrying a medium-sized load. He used the truck to go back and forth to town when he had to purchase things. He had a saw mill, and used sawdust as his fuel, if I remember correctly.

    View Instructable »
  • Buying and Maintaining a 20 year old bandsaw

    I just bought a used band saw that had not been used in several years. I turned it on to be sure it ran, and it was very noisy. The first thing I did was look up the owner's manual on the internet and download it. I can't stress enough how important this is. It gave all the measurements for setting the machine up as though you were unpacking it as a new machine. Every one of the adjustments on my machine were wrong. I set up each adjustment according to the manual, and cleaned out all the sawdust as I went. After I was finished, when I turned it on, you could hardly hear it run, it was so quiet! The manual also told me how to tension each size blade and other general operating tips. There are several sites that offer these manuals free. Do yourself a favor and download the one for your ...see more »I just bought a used band saw that had not been used in several years. I turned it on to be sure it ran, and it was very noisy. The first thing I did was look up the owner's manual on the internet and download it. I can't stress enough how important this is. It gave all the measurements for setting the machine up as though you were unpacking it as a new machine. Every one of the adjustments on my machine were wrong. I set up each adjustment according to the manual, and cleaned out all the sawdust as I went. After I was finished, when I turned it on, you could hardly hear it run, it was so quiet! The manual also told me how to tension each size blade and other general operating tips. There are several sites that offer these manuals free. Do yourself a favor and download the one for your machine.

    View Instructable »
  • jaxboy commented on HoracioP3's instructable LED bonding manually3 months ago
    LED bonding manually

    This reminds me of when I was in the USAF in the 1970's, working in an electronics depot in Germany. My job was to fix the unfixable, things like obsolete, out of stock parts that couldn't be ordered any more. Parts were shipped from all over Europe for me to try to fix. One of the things I did was to repair computer circuit boards for an old weird UN radar installation. The circuit boards had miniature ICs spot-welded into place instead of being soldered! Imagine the fun I had, grinding off the leads of the bad IC without ruining the runs, then spot welding the new IC into place. There were 10 leads to a side, and the ICs were 3/4" long, with the spacing one lead wide. I did this with only a standard desk magnifying lamp, a standard Dremel, and standard Dremel bits! I can tell you...see more »This reminds me of when I was in the USAF in the 1970's, working in an electronics depot in Germany. My job was to fix the unfixable, things like obsolete, out of stock parts that couldn't be ordered any more. Parts were shipped from all over Europe for me to try to fix. One of the things I did was to repair computer circuit boards for an old weird UN radar installation. The circuit boards had miniature ICs spot-welded into place instead of being soldered! Imagine the fun I had, grinding off the leads of the bad IC without ruining the runs, then spot welding the new IC into place. There were 10 leads to a side, and the ICs were 3/4" long, with the spacing one lead wide. I did this with only a standard desk magnifying lamp, a standard Dremel, and standard Dremel bits! I can tell you, my eyes were tired at the end of the day!

    View Instructable »
  • DIY Hot Wire Cutter for Plexiglass, Cardboard and Foam

    Most "wall warts" are DC already, and 12 volt ones are really common, so it would be simply a matter of substituting the "wall wart" for the battery. Actually, it doesn't make any difference whether the voltage is AC or DC; it will still heat the wire the same. The actual voltage out of a "wall wart" depends on how much load it has on it, too. Trial and error is the name of the game.

    You're right. I forgot the current drain on the "wall wart". You would need a pretty good sized one (high amp rating) so you didn't overheat it.

    I'd like to know the resistance of the wire you used, so I could effectively choose my wire. Is the coil from a defunct hair dryer a good choice? Taking the resistance at each place you put the alligator clip for the different materials would make it easy to set the appropriate temperature, instead of guessing each time. Alternatively, to get elaborate, you could attach wires at the different places on the wire for each material, then connect the alligator clip there.

    Most "wall warts" are DC already, and 12 volt ones are really common, so it would be simply a matter of substituting the "wall wart" for the battery. Actually, it doesn't make any difference whether the voltage is AC or DC; it will still heat the wire the same. The actual voltage out of a "wall wart" depends on how much load it has on it, too. Trial and error is the name of the game.

    View Instructable »