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planetariums to electric fences, i work on obscure stuff! looking to hire a mcguyver with a diverse mechanical, marine, radio, and electronics background? drop me a line.

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  • Bringing new life to an old classic marantz stereo receiver with a class D amp board.

    the ground to power isnt a big deal. these things were made to use ungrounded power source in the USA.does it happen with FM radio also? if yes, i would be looking for bad coupling capacitor or maybe failing transistor in audio path for that bad channel in the main preamp section.if the problem is only happening on phono, then i would be checking the problem channel in the phono preamp only. once again my first check would be bad coupling capacitor then maybe failing transistor. nice thing is the phono preamp is fairly simple circuit. you could just replace all electrolytics capacitors in that circuit with new ones of proper value and maybe catch the problem.

    something else to check. have you cleaned the controls? there is a product called deoxit that is meant for cleaning electrical contacts. these old stereos will develop crusty connections that can cause signal to drop. get an account on tapeheads.net and post on solidstate stereo section. surely there will be pictures to show you how to do it.

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  • Re-purposing an Antique Portable Radio Into a Hip Bluetooth Speaker

    you can, nothing says you cant. i did it this way because i wanted to retain some of the functionality of the original on/off volume control. i also wanted to take advantage of a larger driver for fuller sound. many of these radios used 4" or larger speakers of which there are many modern options.

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  • Bringing new life to an old classic marantz stereo receiver with a class D amp board.

    to me it sounds most definitely like a bad electrolytic in the audio path. can be found by bridging a known good cap of same or slightly higher value across good cap and seeing if audio improves. watch polarity! when you find it might as well replace its counterpart on other channel.

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  • ke4mcl commented on ke4mcl's instructable How to fix a cassette tape.5 months ago
    How to fix a cassette tape.

    this will require some detective work. you'll need a good magnifying lens. pull about an inch of tape out of the cassette and let it lay flat against edge of cassette almost is if it were in its normal position during playback. tape must not be folded over or flipped.in good light, closely inspect the cassette with a magnifying lens. you are hoping for visible wear in the tape that you can use to line up the piece that broke off. often times on thin tapes like MC the machine will impart slight stresses on the tape itself that can be found with a magnifying lens. you may also see wear pattern caused by the heads of the machine as they do drag across the tape in normal operation.micro cassette audio tape has magnetic oxide on one side and bare plastic on the other. its easy to figure out ...see more »this will require some detective work. you'll need a good magnifying lens. pull about an inch of tape out of the cassette and let it lay flat against edge of cassette almost is if it were in its normal position during playback. tape must not be folded over or flipped.in good light, closely inspect the cassette with a magnifying lens. you are hoping for visible wear in the tape that you can use to line up the piece that broke off. often times on thin tapes like MC the machine will impart slight stresses on the tape itself that can be found with a magnifying lens. you may also see wear pattern caused by the heads of the machine as they do drag across the tape in normal operation.micro cassette audio tape has magnetic oxide on one side and bare plastic on the other. its easy to figure out which side is the magnetic oxide layer with a magnifying lens but the problem is this wont tell you which way the tape traveled. you have a 50/50 chance of getting it spliced the right way if you just go by which side has the oxide and matching it to the tape in the cassette. worst case the section you spliced is backwards and you'll have to flip it.

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