loading
13 Comments

Tell us about yourself!

Complete Your Profile
  • Start Your Car With a Rope (Dead Battery Life Hack)

    Alas I'm not a part time ex paramedic who couldn't deal with his job. I'm actually a senior FULL TIME paramedic who trains other paramedics, which of coarse means I'm on the road attending incidents and emergencies exactly as every other paramedic does, only with a trainee accompanying me. How you formed the view I was a part time ex paramedic leaves me scratching my head. I guess you didn't read my posts properly.

    View Instructable »
  • Start Your Car With a Rope (Dead Battery Life Hack)

    I love it when people who don't know what experiences I've had or what accident data I have access to as part of my job, try to infer that I don't have the experience or knowledge that I say I have. And since you have obviously already decided you don't believe anything I've said it would be rather pointless to answer your "question" as it's unlikely you'd believe it anyway.

    View Instructable »
  • Start Your Car With a Rope (Dead Battery Life Hack)

    Your response simply confirms what I've learned about people over the years. You don't like what I've said so you label me as someone who thinks they're an authority figure using their self proclaimed expert knowledge to lord it over others. Your response is quite childish.

    I learnt long ago that people do not like being told that certain outcomes could occur as a result of someone's own actions.Most people will go to great lengths to discount such warnings or refuse to heed or acknowledge the documented outcomes of such activities; and indeed we've seen numerous examples of just that on this very discussion with some posters labeling other posters as being alarmist or negative nellies and the like. Just because I've detailed some possible outcomes if someone tries this technique doesn't make anything I say biased. All I'm doing is speaking from experience and data accumulated over many years. It makes no difference to me whether you heed what I say or not. I've also learnt over time that it is often those same people who accuse others of being negative...see more »I learnt long ago that people do not like being told that certain outcomes could occur as a result of someone's own actions.Most people will go to great lengths to discount such warnings or refuse to heed or acknowledge the documented outcomes of such activities; and indeed we've seen numerous examples of just that on this very discussion with some posters labeling other posters as being alarmist or negative nellies and the like. Just because I've detailed some possible outcomes if someone tries this technique doesn't make anything I say biased. All I'm doing is speaking from experience and data accumulated over many years. It makes no difference to me whether you heed what I say or not. I've also learnt over time that it is often those same people who accuse others of being negative or alarmist who end up going out and having an accident or seriously injuring themselves and then afterwards say why wasn't I told of the potential dangers or you could've at least warned me.

    View Instructable »
  • Start Your Car With a Rope (Dead Battery Life Hack)

    Whatever action you decide to take is entirely up to you. However if you do embark on a particular coarse of action after having been informed of all the associated dangers involved in doing so and you subsequently do injure yourself you have only yourself to blame, nor should you expect someone else to come along and help you out of the situation you've created for yourself. As for the safety aspects of using a car jack, suggest you do some research on the web and find out how many people are injured or killed each year from jacks slipping or collapsing. I think you'll be quite shocked. And next time you do use a roadside assistance service to come change your flat tyre, note what they use to jack the vehicle up with. Hint: it's not a car jack, itll be either a garage type hydraulic fl...see more »Whatever action you decide to take is entirely up to you. However if you do embark on a particular coarse of action after having been informed of all the associated dangers involved in doing so and you subsequently do injure yourself you have only yourself to blame, nor should you expect someone else to come along and help you out of the situation you've created for yourself. As for the safety aspects of using a car jack, suggest you do some research on the web and find out how many people are injured or killed each year from jacks slipping or collapsing. I think you'll be quite shocked. And next time you do use a roadside assistance service to come change your flat tyre, note what they use to jack the vehicle up with. Hint: it's not a car jack, itll be either a garage type hydraulic floor jack or an inflatable air bag type. And why? because they've been proven to be reliable and safe. The same cannot be said of the standard car jack!!

    What the early Beetles were fitted with was the ZF Type B-70 sliding pin and cam differential which was an automatic locking type differential, not a limited slip type differential.Automatic locking type differentials have certain similar operational characteristics to a LSD But are designed to perform a different function. T

    View Instructable »
  • Start Your Car With a Rope (Dead Battery Life Hack)

    No I don't have PTSD. As I have said several times, I am an Ambulance Paramedic. As part of my job, I am also a senior training officer. Everything I've said is unequivocally backed up by thousands of hours real life experience. Now I'm not wanting to sound rude or arrogant but everything you've said is purely theoretical, whereas everything I've said is based on real life situations and experience. Irregardless of whether the force being applied to a jack is that of a downward load or a side force, no jack is stable simply because by dint of the nature of their design the base has only a very small footprint area [no more than a few square inches in most cases] whilst the lift head is even smaller in area and is usually only held in situ by a thin easily twisted strip of metal proje...see more »No I don't have PTSD. As I have said several times, I am an Ambulance Paramedic. As part of my job, I am also a senior training officer. Everything I've said is unequivocally backed up by thousands of hours real life experience. Now I'm not wanting to sound rude or arrogant but everything you've said is purely theoretical, whereas everything I've said is based on real life situations and experience. Irregardless of whether the force being applied to a jack is that of a downward load or a side force, no jack is stable simply because by dint of the nature of their design the base has only a very small footprint area [no more than a few square inches in most cases] whilst the lift head is even smaller in area and is usually only held in situ by a thin easily twisted strip of metal projecting down from the bottom of the vehicles sill [box] section. If you peruse any vehicle owners instruction book, you'll find very prominent warnings about just how unstable jacks are.Those warning are there for a reason. So why are vehicles still equipped with such unstable and dangerous devices by their makers? Simple, such devices are cheap to manufacture, weigh very little and are compact and take up very little luggage/load space.

    None of the vehicles you mention had LSD A quick perusal of the vehicle manufacturers specifications will confirm that. In the case of the DAF the belt drive system comprised two vee shaped pulleys linked by a fixed length belt. The engine end pulley being split vertically with the outer half having centrifugal weights attached which depending on the engine RPM would cause that pulley to move sideways thus altering the diameter of the contact area of the belt at that end and thus creating varying rpm ratio.

    View Instructable »