author
1Instructables239,168Views24CommentsJoined May 7th, 2008

Tell us about yourself!

Complete Your Profile

Achievements

10K+ Views Earned a bronze medal
  • Remove and Replace the Bezel on Your Rolex Submariner.

    Thats a good trick. Much less likely to have to look up an Instructible for “how to clean blood off my Rolex”. Sorry if i hadnt responded to some comments. These emails were going to spam for a while and i just noticed.

    View Instructable »
  • mcgary911 commented on bluesky's instructable Fix a Dyson Vacuum Hose5 months ago
    Fix a Dyson Vacuum Hose

    Thanks for this. I was on the right track, but that grey thing is a beotch to remove. Your heat idea helped a ton. As some others mentioned, I went the heat guy route. It still wasn't easy, but I got it out. We'll see how the glue holds. If the crazy glue doesn't do it, I'll break out the high temp hot glue gun.

    View Instructable »
  • mcgary911 made the instructable Resin Penny Floor Project!7 months ago
    Resin Penny Floor Project!

    Well, something close to it. I did the top of the bar I built in my mancave. It turned out great, but to ensure a great outcome, there's a lot more involved. Some things that are mega important are prep, proper mixing and proper temperature for a proper curing. If these aren't just right, you can end up with soft\sticky spots and you pretty much only get 1 shot @ this. If my bartop went sideways, I could pry it off and start over. That's tougher to do with a floor. Mixing. Follow your manufacture's ration to a T. Use a graduated mixing bucket to get it perfect. Pour the epoxy first as it's a lot thicker than the hardener. My mix was 50/50 so that made it much easier for me. Mix it thoroughly. Hand mixing may not do. I used a paint mixer (little red turbo looking silicone thing) that I ...

    see more »

    Well, something close to it. I did the top of the bar I built in my mancave. It turned out great, but to ensure a great outcome, there's a lot more involved. Some things that are mega important are prep, proper mixing and proper temperature for a proper curing. If these aren't just right, you can end up with soft\sticky spots and you pretty much only get 1 shot @ this. If my bartop went sideways, I could pry it off and start over. That's tougher to do with a floor. Mixing. Follow your manufacture's ration to a T. Use a graduated mixing bucket to get it perfect. Pour the epoxy first as it's a lot thicker than the hardener. My mix was 50/50 so that made it much easier for me. Mix it thoroughly. Hand mixing may not do. I used a paint mixer (little red turbo looking silicone thing) that I attached to my cordless drill. I mixed for 5 minutes, pausing in the middle to scrape the sides of the bucket. When pouring, you'll have some residual resin on the sides and bottom of the bucket. You'll be tempted to scrape out every last drop. Don't. It's likely not mixed as well as it needs to be and could cause sticky spots. Order enough resin, too much is a ton better than too little. After you pour, you only have maybe 1/2 an hour to continue with the next batch. The sooner the better. My resin started curing after 10 minutes. I had a buddy mixing batch #2 so I could pour uninterrupted. You CAN create a dam. I used some 1x2 pine ferring strips. Make sure you pick straight ones. I wrapped them in some 4mm painters poly so the resin woudln't stick. It worked great. For a round cutout like my beer tap, I used 3" aluminum tape. Temperature is vital for a proper cure. My resin called for at least 85 degrees F. I used a space heater up there to maintain that temp for 3 days. Keep in mind doing a floor will be trickier, especially on a slab as it'll have a LOT more thermal mass. You'll have to start heating it up way in advance to get it warm enough. I'd use one of those cheap infrared temp gauges to ensure it's not too cold before the pour. Get a heat gun to ensure you don't have bubbles. It may not look it, but when you hit it with the heat gun (quick pass is all it takes), you'll be surprised how much clearer it gets when those bubbles you didn't see vanish. Keep an eye for other bubbles forming (bigger ones). Once you start curing, you can't hit the bubbles any more. Again that was 10 minuets for me. Some prefer a propane torch. I tried both and went with the heat gun. With the torch i was afraid I'd melt the poly on my dams. Clean up any mess that got on your floor or walls with some acetone. Once it's cured, it's scrape city, so make sure you get it all the easy way. I got almost all of it. While mine was touchable after 12 hours and usable (mostly cured) after 3 days, I gave it longer. The maker said it won't be fully cured for a month. Coasters until then.Finally, DO A TEST POUR! I did a test pour on a 1x1 piece of plywood prepped exactly like my bartop. I learned a LOT by doing that. Account for the test pour when you order your resin. I was scared as hell when I poured, but a lot less so due to my experience with the test piece. As for durability? It's gonna scratch. A floor, moreso. All it takes is some dirt or sand on someone's feet, dog claws, etc and it'll leave marks. It's possible to polish, but if not done properly the buffer can scorch the resin, so be careful (did you throw away your test piece?) or hire someone experienced. As for pennies, my 11 by about just under 3' bar used about 9000 of them. What a PAIN that was to glue down 1 @ a time. It doesn't make sense for a floor, but for my bartop I added some easter eggs; a wheat penny or 2 (US), some foreign coins and even an old vintage token from a times square peep show. I wanted some pennies a little crusty, so I soaked them in some muriatic acid for a day. It gave them a very nice patina. Just ensure you neutralize them with a lot of clean water and some vinegar before you glue them down. I used 3 gallons of resin to cover the area with 1/8" of resin. I had just enough. Whew. I'll try to answer any other questions. I'm very happy with the results. So much so, when I redo the vanity in the mancave's bathroom I'm thinking of doing a penny top counter.

    View Instructable »
  • mcgary911 commented on makendo's instructable Black Hole Table1 year ago
    Black Hole Table

    Very cool. When I first checked it i figured that the infinity mirror part was between the table top and the bottom. That would be interesting to do and not too tough to test. Remove your 1 way mirror from the top of the existing rig in the bottom and get some mirror tint film from a window tint place and use it on the bottom of your tabletop. That would be a different look for sure. Heck, try it with both the bottom and new top 1 way glass. That could get really freaky. If it's a horrible affect, it's very easy to bring back to it's current state by peeling off the tint. Great job.

    View Instructable »
  • Remove and replace the bezel on your Rolex Submariner.

    Charles, your wife is lucky to have a yachtmaster which features a platinum bezel and dial. Your wife is less lucky that she has to replace that platinum bezel. That stuff is expensive. You don't have to go to a Rolex dealer to get a legit Rolex repair. A good watch shop that fixes Rolex watches should be able to show you documentation that they have a legit Rolex parts account. That's a good assurance that you're getting the real deal. It'll still be expensive, but may save you a bit. Genuine dials are certainly sold privately, but there are a lot of fakes out there. Unless you have a good amount of knowledge, buy a bezel or watch locally and meet at a watch shop who has agreed to verify authenticity (for a fee). That way you can save a few bucks from a private sale and ensure you're g...

    see more »

    Charles, your wife is lucky to have a yachtmaster which features a platinum bezel and dial. Your wife is less lucky that she has to replace that platinum bezel. That stuff is expensive. You don't have to go to a Rolex dealer to get a legit Rolex repair. A good watch shop that fixes Rolex watches should be able to show you documentation that they have a legit Rolex parts account. That's a good assurance that you're getting the real deal. It'll still be expensive, but may save you a bit. Genuine dials are certainly sold privately, but there are a lot of fakes out there. Unless you have a good amount of knowledge, buy a bezel or watch locally and meet at a watch shop who has agreed to verify authenticity (for a fee). That way you can save a few bucks from a private sale and ensure you're getting the real deal. There's no cheap answer here, but I hope this helps.

    View Instructable »
  • Remove and replace the bezel on your Rolex Submariner.

    Wow, lucky to find that even in the confines of your trunk. I'll admit, I had to look to see what a paramotor was. Very cool toy. Glad you're back in business watch-wise.

    View Instructable »