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  • qs commented on qs's instructable Adding 'Oomph' to the Garden Solar Light2 months ago
    Adding 'Oomph' to the Garden Solar Light

    Any diode that can handle 150mA or more is suitable here. I've used the 1N4148 and they're still running after 5 years. If you can afford Schottky diodes they are even more efficient.

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  • Build a low cost, scrolling LED display for your Arduino microprocessor.

    Here is the image of the LED board shown in Step 5 with a bit more description. The resistors are hidden by Layer 2 but the green lines show where they connect.

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  • Using AC with LEDs (Part 2) - and make this handy counter light.

    Good point - if the wiring is exposed, a 4.7k 1/2w resistor across the capacitor will reduce chances of electrical shock, but since the circuit was intended to be hidden away in an enclosure, I did not include that.

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  • qs commented on qs's instructable Adding 'Oomph' to the Garden Solar Light5 months ago
    Adding 'Oomph' to the Garden Solar Light

    Hello there!It's always questionable whether a battery is being charged on overcast days. In the northern latitudes, even on sunny days, it is necessary to point the solar cell in a southerly direction, angled approximately 35-degrees to get the maximum exposure to sunlight. A good rule of thumb is that typical solar cell will produce about 50mA to charge the NiCad under full sunlight. So that translates to about the same operating time, since the JT here uses about 50mA while operating. So basically, you'll need 10 hours of sunlight to run the light through the night. Less sunlight? Less time.That's the reason I developed alternate circuits, notably the 'reverse' Joule Thief and the Blinking Joule Thief. Both are attempts to wring a bit more operating time out of whatever sunlight we s...see more »Hello there!It's always questionable whether a battery is being charged on overcast days. In the northern latitudes, even on sunny days, it is necessary to point the solar cell in a southerly direction, angled approximately 35-degrees to get the maximum exposure to sunlight. A good rule of thumb is that typical solar cell will produce about 50mA to charge the NiCad under full sunlight. So that translates to about the same operating time, since the JT here uses about 50mA while operating. So basically, you'll need 10 hours of sunlight to run the light through the night. Less sunlight? Less time.That's the reason I developed alternate circuits, notably the 'reverse' Joule Thief and the Blinking Joule Thief. Both are attempts to wring a bit more operating time out of whatever sunlight we see each day.I'm a fan of the blinking JT circuit since it can multiply run times by a factor of over 3, meaning I get 3 days of "reserve" for each day of sunlight.Let me know if this answers your q!qs

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