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  • Arduino-controlled UV LED PCB Exposure Box

    VERY sorry for not answering questions. Shortly after posting this I ended up in the hospital for a very long stay. I accidentally came across my own instructable today and just now noticed the comments. I'll try to answer some of the questions above.Reed Relay (JP7): This was classified as a "reed relay" but was a 4 pin, small relay. It had a tiny coil in it with a SPST contact. The schematic does not clearly show this at all. JP7 was connected to the SPST contacts to supply 12V to the UV Light Board. A better solution would be to use a general purpose NPN with it's base controlled by any digital pin. Use a 1k resistor inline with the digital pin and base. Ground the emitter. Connect the light board GND to the collector and the positive terminal of the light board to your 12...

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    VERY sorry for not answering questions. Shortly after posting this I ended up in the hospital for a very long stay. I accidentally came across my own instructable today and just now noticed the comments. I'll try to answer some of the questions above.Reed Relay (JP7): This was classified as a "reed relay" but was a 4 pin, small relay. It had a tiny coil in it with a SPST contact. The schematic does not clearly show this at all. JP7 was connected to the SPST contacts to supply 12V to the UV Light Board. A better solution would be to use a general purpose NPN with it's base controlled by any digital pin. Use a 1k resistor inline with the digital pin and base. Ground the emitter. Connect the light board GND to the collector and the positive terminal of the light board to your 12V source. The distance between the LED's and the board was not an exact science but it was approximately 4 to 5 inches. Although I would expect distances up to 10 inches to work fine with longer exposure times.Yes, I did use the Nano simply for the ease of plug and play, and it made it easy to replace if it ever failed!LCD Pins: If memory serves, I did not require all 16 pins on the LCD module. If I were to do it all over again, I would definately just use one of those I2C converters for these LCD modules in order to simplify the design to only 4 pins (power, ground, SCL, SDA).Other mentioned pin headers: JP7: switched 12V power to the light boardJP4: GND and 12V going to the light boardJP8: just an auxillary switched 12V source. I included this in consideration for possibly making 2 layer boards using two light boards. It's not used in this design.

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  • Burn Arduino Bootloader on Atmega-328 TQFP and DIP chips on Breadboard

    I've programmed many ATmega chips using various methods (UNO as ISP, USBTiny, Atmel Studio, etc). I'm now starting a project using the ATmega32U4 44 pin TQFP iC (Leonardo).Do you know of any specific configuration or settings to consider for these chips? Also ... once the bootloader has been burned I should be able to use the on-board USB host to upload sketches correct?Thanks in advance for any advice! I'll probably pick up one of those TQFP to DIP adapters. The 44 pin versions can be found here for anyone else interested...http://www.ebay.com/itm/261576185880?_trksid=p2055119.m1438.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

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