loading
1Instructables2,899Views2 Comments

Tell us about yourself!

Complete Your Profile

Achievements

Show 0 More »
  • rlgroom commented on rlgroom's instructable Installing a standard electrical outlet5 months ago
    Installing a standard electrical outlet

    That is a great observation! While I have seen that practice in commercial electrical work I very rarely see it in residential. Personally for this write-up, I chose to follow the orientation of the rest of the outlets in my house. Overall I do agree with the benefits of installing the outlet “Ground-Up” (I don’t want to call it upside-down as that implies that the correct way is right-side-up). However, the benefit is lost on many appliances such as lamps, televisions, toasters, hair dryers, etc. that do not have a grounding prong to protect against falling objects bridging hot and neutral.While it is a good practice to follow, I think many home owners will still probably choose the familiar look of the “Ground-Down” orientation because it does look weird ...see more »That is a great observation! While I have seen that practice in commercial electrical work I very rarely see it in residential. Personally for this write-up, I chose to follow the orientation of the rest of the outlets in my house. Overall I do agree with the benefits of installing the outlet “Ground-Up” (I don’t want to call it upside-down as that implies that the correct way is right-side-up). However, the benefit is lost on many appliances such as lamps, televisions, toasters, hair dryers, etc. that do not have a grounding prong to protect against falling objects bridging hot and neutral.While it is a good practice to follow, I think many home owners will still probably choose the familiar look of the “Ground-Down” orientation because it does look weird reversed. Having one outlet look different may draw attention to it and I can’t imagine anyone would want their outlets to be a conversation piece.Since outlet orientation is not in the electrical code (at least where I live) it will be up to each installer to decide their personal preference.Thanks for sharing.

    That is a great observation! While I have seen this practicein commercial electrical work I very rarely see it in residential. Personallyfor this write-up, I chose to follow the orientation of the rest of the outletsin my house. Overall I do agree with the benefits of installing the outlet “Ground-Up”(I don’t want to call it upside-down as that implies that the correct way isright-side-up). However, the benefit is lost on many appliances such as lamps,televisions, toasters, hair dryers, etc. that do not have a grounding prong toprotect against falling objects bridging hot and neutral.While it is a good practice to follow, I think many homeowners will still probably choose the familiar look of the “Ground-Down”orientation because it does look weird reversed....see more »That is a great observation! While I have seen this practicein commercial electrical work I very rarely see it in residential. Personallyfor this write-up, I chose to follow the orientation of the rest of the outletsin my house. Overall I do agree with the benefits of installing the outlet “Ground-Up”(I don’t want to call it upside-down as that implies that the correct way isright-side-up). However, the benefit is lost on many appliances such as lamps,televisions, toasters, hair dryers, etc. that do not have a grounding prong toprotect against falling objects bridging hot and neutral.While it is a good practice to follow, I think many homeowners will still probably choose the familiar look of the “Ground-Down”orientation because it does look weird reversed. Having one outlet lookdifferent may draw attention to it and I can’t imagine anyone would want theiroutlets to be a conversation piece.Since outlet orientation is not in the electrical code (atleast where I live) it will be up to each installer to decide their personal preference.Thanks for sharing.

    View Instructable »