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  • How to fix your swamp cooler ("Overclock" it 50%)

    I hope you have success, let me know how it works.

    Also, On this one, I put the biggest one they had at home depot. It was the 110,000 one and It couldn't really keep up. If you could get a bigger one, you probably will still want to increase the number of distribution tubes.

    At somewhere between 94 and 97 degrees, most coolers can't keep the pads wet enough to provide cooling. As a result, they stop working well. It is a problem for thousands and thousands of swamp coolers. It is a well documented fact supported here by the many successful implementations of this idea, as well as other ideas aimed at keeping the pads wet at high temperatures.Some coolers and owners are able to do a better job of keeping the pads wet, but most lose effectiveness over time. The loss of performance may simply be due to incorrect pads, scaling of pads, undersized pump, or lack of maintenance. However, many of these units also suffer from design flaws and manufacturing defects such as: poorly placed or aligned output tubes, undersized pumps, water distribution channels tha...see more » At somewhere between 94 and 97 degrees, most coolers can't keep the pads wet enough to provide cooling. As a result, they stop working well. It is a problem for thousands and thousands of swamp coolers. It is a well documented fact supported here by the many successful implementations of this idea, as well as other ideas aimed at keeping the pads wet at high temperatures.Some coolers and owners are able to do a better job of keeping the pads wet, but most lose effectiveness over time. The loss of performance may simply be due to incorrect pads, scaling of pads, undersized pump, or lack of maintenance. However, many of these units also suffer from design flaws and manufacturing defects such as: poorly placed or aligned output tubes, undersized pumps, water distribution channels that don't allow for good water flow, etc. It is for these problems that I wrote this instructable.In addition, it is a verifiable fact that the effectiveness of a swamp cooler decreases as the relative humidity increases, not a myth. It is just one of those pesky laws of physics that we haven't been able to overturn yet. At a 106 degree outside to get 70 degree air, you will need to be less then 5% humidity. On the day of your post, you had a low of 7% humidity in Acton, so it seems probable that you would be blowing approximately 72-74 degree air with an outside temp of 106. If, for example, you were at 35% humidity on that day, you would only be blowing 88 degree air.This is why you don't see swamp coolers in the southeast US very often. It becomes more economic to just use a normal air conditioner when the humidity is up over 25% during the heat of the day.Hopefully this explanation will be helpful to people. You can google how swamp coolers work for some good articles on the subject.

    At somewhere between 94 and 97 degrees, most coolers can't keep the pads wet enough to provide cooling. As a result, they stop working well. It is a problem for thousands and thousands of swamp coolers. It is a well documented fact supported here by the many successful implementations of this idea, as well as other ideas aimed at keeping the pads wet at high temperatures.Some coolers and owners are able to do a better job of keeping the pads wet, but most lose effectiveness over time. The loss of performance may simply be due to incorrect pads, scaling of pads, undersized pump, or lack of maintenance. However, many of these units also suffer from design flaws and manufacturing defects such as: poorly placed or aligned output tubes, undersized pumps, water distribution channels tha...see more » At somewhere between 94 and 97 degrees, most coolers can't keep the pads wet enough to provide cooling. As a result, they stop working well. It is a problem for thousands and thousands of swamp coolers. It is a well documented fact supported here by the many successful implementations of this idea, as well as other ideas aimed at keeping the pads wet at high temperatures.Some coolers and owners are able to do a better job of keeping the pads wet, but most lose effectiveness over time. The loss of performance may simply be due to incorrect pads, scaling of pads, undersized pump, or lack of maintenance. However, many of these units also suffer from design flaws and manufacturing defects such as: poorly placed or aligned output tubes, undersized pumps, water distribution channels that don't allow for good water flow, etc. It is for these problems that I wrote this instructable.In addition, it is a verifiable fact that the effectiveness of a swamp cooler decreases as the relative humidity increases, not a myth. It is just one of those pesky laws of physics that we haven't been able to overturn yet. At a 106 degree outside to get 70 degree air, you will need to be less then 5% humidity. On the day of your post, you had a low of 7% humidity in Acton, so it seems probable that you would be blowing approximately 72-74 degree air with an outside temp of 106. If, for example, you were at 35% humidity on that day, you would only be blowing 88 degree air.This is why you don't see swamp coolers in the southeast US very often. It becomes more economic to just use a normal air conditioner when the humidity is up over 25% during the heat of the day.Hopefully this explanation will be helpful to people. You can google how swamp coolers work for some good articles on the subject.

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  • How to fix your swamp cooler ("Overclock" it 50%)

    You can do that. The other part of the trick is to get better distribution of the water at the top of the pads with more output hoses. Two pumps allows you to add the thermostat on #2, that is addressed in the comments early on.

    I have had both, (here in Utah) The Master cool works a little bit better, but they are expensive and you have to replace the cardboard insert things every couple years and they are also expensive. I modded the master cool to spray more water also, but I did it a little differently, but same basic idea.

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