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  • HF Antenna Analyser With Arduino and DDS Module

    VE6CMM here. I would like to see a schematic as I can't really follow your breadboard layout. Would it be possible to add one??It's a nice looking project and I think that you have done an excellent job with it.

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  • ve6cmm commented on Darthorso's instructable Easy Handmade Manitoba Bread3 weeks ago
    Easy Handmade Manitoba Bread

    I love bread and this sounds terrific. I am from Manitoba and remember the bread there. It really was the best. Winnipeg Rye Bread is another that is unobtainable anywhere, other than Manitoba. I would love that recipe.

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  • ve6cmm commented on thediylife's instructable DIY Cordless Cold Heat Soldering Iron1 month ago
    DIY Cordless Cold Heat Soldering Iron

    Also, a protected button switch is mandatory, otherwise the tips are alive as long as the battery is in place. A good possibility is a small push-button with a shield around the activator. This could control a high power mosfet with extremely low on resistance in series with the tip.

    Something that no one has mentioned is that there is a potential (no pun intended) of damaging attached circuitry as the solder tip is going to have 6 or so volts across it. This could damage a lot of components on a circuit board if used there. It is an interesting idea for soldering wires together. I can see that there would be a bit of a learning curve to using it.I also think that it might be interesting to see how it would work on coaxial connectors. These require a lot of heat to solder, but as the heat isn't being transferred from a soldering iron tip to metal, it may work quite well. One problem I have always had with soldering outdoors is that wind will draw a lot of heat away from the tip, sometimes making a joint impossible. This method should be able to overcome some o...see more »Something that no one has mentioned is that there is a potential (no pun intended) of damaging attached circuitry as the solder tip is going to have 6 or so volts across it. This could damage a lot of components on a circuit board if used there. It is an interesting idea for soldering wires together. I can see that there would be a bit of a learning curve to using it.I also think that it might be interesting to see how it would work on coaxial connectors. These require a lot of heat to solder, but as the heat isn't being transferred from a soldering iron tip to metal, it may work quite well. One problem I have always had with soldering outdoors is that wind will draw a lot of heat away from the tip, sometimes making a joint impossible. This method should be able to overcome some of this problem.I am going to give this a shot for cables, and other items, but I doubt that I would risk using it on a circuit board.

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  • ve6cmm commented on MK DIY's instructable MK: DIY Milling Table for Drill Press1 month ago
    MK: DIY Milling Table for Drill Press

    Brilliant! I have been milling on my drill press for a while, but nothing that wasn't round. I have made shafts for radio's and other items. I wave always wanted one but can't afford it for what I do. This is a great way to get more use out of a drill press. I am going to give it a try and maybe will be able to use it with metal.

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  • 6.3 kiloWatt Ground Mount Home Solar Array

    This is one of the best Instructables I have ever seen! Well done. I have played a little bit with solar systems, I have a 1KW one on the motor home, and an experimental 250W one for my ham shack, and have learned a lot from this. Unfortunately, I don't have the room to do something like this.Aluminum wiring is a pain to work with, but is much cheaper than copper. I can see why you used it. Another alternative may have been placing the inverter in a weather proof box at the panel, although I don't know if this would pass the legislation.I have a friend who is completely off the grid and has a round a 6 KW panel. This is in Ontario and they get a ton of snow in the winter. His is a low voltage system, 48V, and the batteries and inverter are very close to the panels to reduce the v...see more »This is one of the best Instructables I have ever seen! Well done. I have played a little bit with solar systems, I have a 1KW one on the motor home, and an experimental 250W one for my ham shack, and have learned a lot from this. Unfortunately, I don't have the room to do something like this.Aluminum wiring is a pain to work with, but is much cheaper than copper. I can see why you used it. Another alternative may have been placing the inverter in a weather proof box at the panel, although I don't know if this would pass the legislation.I have a friend who is completely off the grid and has a round a 6 KW panel. This is in Ontario and they get a ton of snow in the winter. His is a low voltage system, 48V, and the batteries and inverter are very close to the panels to reduce the voltage drop due to the high current involved. From the inverter, he runs the standard 3 conductor L1/N/L2 configuration to his home. In 10 years, he has never lost power.There are many new homes going up in Calgary with large south facing roofs. Many of them are completely covered in solar panels as the house was designed to have them. They look terrific, in a Sci-Fi sort of way. My understanding is that they are grid tied. I am sure that this is a less expensive way to get solar than doing it yourself as the builder would get a huge discount.Again, this is a great instructable. Thank you.

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  • ve6cmm commented on Proto G's instructable 1000W Portable Induction Heater1 month ago
    1000W Portable Induction Heater

    Hi willtoolman,Yes, fusible links are used in cars, and they do protect circuitry, and they are designed for it. It's also low voltage, which does not arc for any great distance. A piece of wire isn't designed as a fusible link. I guess you have never seen the results of a wire being over stressed by much more power than it has been designed for. First, you smell some hot plastic, then you see flames. Turning off the power does not help. My neighbor had his whole dash in his Chevy truck go up in smoke because Chevy ran the wiring loom so tightly across a piece of steel supporting the dash that it cut through, shorting 28 wires out, and they burnt back over a foot. This is apparently good fusable link application! It worked wonderfully. Chevy could sell another $1000 wiring loom...see more »Hi willtoolman,Yes, fusible links are used in cars, and they do protect circuitry, and they are designed for it. It's also low voltage, which does not arc for any great distance. A piece of wire isn't designed as a fusible link. I guess you have never seen the results of a wire being over stressed by much more power than it has been designed for. First, you smell some hot plastic, then you see flames. Turning off the power does not help. My neighbor had his whole dash in his Chevy truck go up in smoke because Chevy ran the wiring loom so tightly across a piece of steel supporting the dash that it cut through, shorting 28 wires out, and they burnt back over a foot. This is apparently good fusable link application! It worked wonderfully. Chevy could sell another $1000 wiring loom! Exactly what they want - protect their income.If it was no big deal, like you suggest, maybe we don't need fuses at all? I could be wrong about that, but I don't mind spending an extra buck or two to do it right.I guess doing things properly and safely isn't a big concern for some. I have bypassed protection circuitry and fuses in my own equipment when testing, or if it is in a "one off", short term piece of equipment, but I would never suggest not fusing a piece of line powered equipment in an Instructable. Proto G explained why he did it, this was an extension to one of his earlier projects, which I had not seen. I have been a member of Instructables for years and never saw his previous posts. I looked back through his many Instructables and found even more info on this project. The one using a 300VDC PWM supply was very good, and the heating element WAS isolated from the line and appropriately protected.It seems bot the and I know better as to how to appropriately protect equipment. Many newcomers and backyard mechanics may not. Going super cheap is NEVER a good idea.

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  • ve6cmm commented on Proto G's instructable 1000W Portable Induction Heater1 month ago
    1000W Portable Induction Heater

    Thank you for your response.I haven't seen your previous projects, and I would think that many others that have seen this project and not the others might just follow your example. I have variacs, and none of mine are isolated. I don't think the typical hobbiest would have one like yours, as they are quite expensive. Stating that these things should be isolated from line voltage should have been mentioned. There are liability issues that you may not be able to shrug off. My comment stands - THE PROJECT SHOULD BE ISOLATED FROM THE AC MAINS.Thanks for the information about the batteries. I did not realize that they could pack such a punch. I'll have to look into those for some projects of mine.I mentioned the cooling simply because the suppliers on EBAY mention that it should be do...see more »Thank you for your response.I haven't seen your previous projects, and I would think that many others that have seen this project and not the others might just follow your example. I have variacs, and none of mine are isolated. I don't think the typical hobbiest would have one like yours, as they are quite expensive. Stating that these things should be isolated from line voltage should have been mentioned. There are liability issues that you may not be able to shrug off. My comment stands - THE PROJECT SHOULD BE ISOLATED FROM THE AC MAINS.Thanks for the information about the batteries. I did not realize that they could pack such a punch. I'll have to look into those for some projects of mine.I mentioned the cooling simply because the suppliers on EBAY mention that it should be done. It makes sense to me as well. It's simple to do, and may prevent the copper tubing from melting. After a few minutes of heating, I can see that the copper could become quite hot and possibly melt. It has been stressed simply by winding it, and that can make it weaker.I have designed many items for communications, instrumentation, electrical, and industrial applications. I can see from the instrumentation in your shop that you know what you are doing, for you, but the idea when designing something potentially deadly, and this is by UL, CSA, and CE standards, you need to design it for the less technically informed.I like the project, don't get me wrong, and I am going to build one. Even though I will most likely be the only one that may use it, I am still going to make it safe for anyone to use. We all make mistakes, especially when we are trying to do something quickly.Oh, I have seen short pieces of wire go up in smoke, even though they can carry large currents for short periods of time without heating up too much. In this case, you aren't even fused, so if your mosfets shorted out for some reason, that little piece of wire would flame out in 1/2 second. I guess you call that a fuse?????

    All I am trying to say is a lot of the people on Instructables do not have the knowledge or experience that you and I do, and that needs to be taken into consideration. I have never seen any of your Instructables until this one showed up in my inbox today. It has solved a problem that I run into once in a while when working in my shop. I'd often thought of building a system like this, and your project has saved me a lot of time.However, I am sure that others have seen this that don't have our experience and are going to try to build it. You might want to mention the safety aspects of your projects so you can CYA.The project is great. I know I am going to use it. How long it will be running for, I am not sure. But these things can be used for bending steel pipe, copper pipe, alumi...see more »All I am trying to say is a lot of the people on Instructables do not have the knowledge or experience that you and I do, and that needs to be taken into consideration. I have never seen any of your Instructables until this one showed up in my inbox today. It has solved a problem that I run into once in a while when working in my shop. I'd often thought of building a system like this, and your project has saved me a lot of time.However, I am sure that others have seen this that don't have our experience and are going to try to build it. You might want to mention the safety aspects of your projects so you can CYA.The project is great. I know I am going to use it. How long it will be running for, I am not sure. But these things can be used for bending steel pipe, copper pipe, aluminum pipe into very nicely curved pieces, and maybe even square tubing. I build a lot of prototype electronics, and often have to come up with something unique. That's what I am hoping to be able to do with this. I may end up having to build a much larger system to do some projects, but this is a very good start.Thank you for the kick in the butt and the inspiration to build this.Also, have you tried changing the frequency of operation? I know some of the really big systems have a variable frequency so that they can get higher efficiency with different materials.

    I have found a lot of different ZVS drivers on EBAY, and selected a pretty decent one, including the induction coil. One problem that I noticed in your design is that the electronics is NOT isolated from the AC mains, making this extremely dangerous to use (potential for electrocution!). A 48 Volt switching power supply capable of 20 to 30 amps should be used to drive this equipment.I am very impressed with the demonstration, however, I would think that using batteries would not be too useful as they would run out of power quite quickly. Also, drawing 20A out of a small lithium battery may cause them to over heat, making them very dangerous.Another thing I noticed in the video was the wire gauge to the switch is too small. The wire could, and probably does, heat up when the system i...see more »I have found a lot of different ZVS drivers on EBAY, and selected a pretty decent one, including the induction coil. One problem that I noticed in your design is that the electronics is NOT isolated from the AC mains, making this extremely dangerous to use (potential for electrocution!). A 48 Volt switching power supply capable of 20 to 30 amps should be used to drive this equipment.I am very impressed with the demonstration, however, I would think that using batteries would not be too useful as they would run out of power quite quickly. Also, drawing 20A out of a small lithium battery may cause them to over heat, making them very dangerous.Another thing I noticed in the video was the wire gauge to the switch is too small. The wire could, and probably does, heat up when the system is running. It should be at least #12 wire to be safe. It looks like it is maybe #16.It is also recommended that the induction coil be cooled with flowing water. I am sure that doing so would greatly extend the life of the coil.I am going to make one of these, but I am going to make it SAFE. There's no sense dying when you are having fun. It kind of puts a damper on the day!!

    Great chatting with you too. I looked way back in your instructables and found your posts very informative. I have all the makings for a 3KW system in my shop, believe it or not. I built a 3KW power inverter that will operate anywhere from 30 to 70KHz as it stands, so really all I need to do is wind a big toroid and the heating coil circuit!I can see me getting into trouble........

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  • ve6cmm followed Proto G1 month ago
      • 1000W Portable Induction Heater
      • How to Make a Metal Key With a 3D Printer
      • Dual Sensor Gauss Meter for Testing Magnet Strength
  • ve6cmm commented on smooth_jamie's instructable AC Current monitoring data logger3 months ago
    AC Current monitoring data logger

    John, the input load is the 1K resistor. When used as an amplifier, the input of an OPAMP is ZERO ohms. The feedback resistor guarantees this when the amplifier is running in the linear range.I have used CT's in a number of commercial device designs. Usually, the CT is defined by an input to output current ratio. The CT will always try to output the current ratio, so a load should always be across the CT.In this case, as long as the OPAMP is powered up, there is no problem. However, if the system is powered down the voltage developed across the CT's leads could be large enough to kill the opamp. A better idea would be to put a 500R resistor or 2 zener diodes across the CT output to limit the voltage developed.

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  • ve6cmm followed sfrwmaker5 months ago
      • Soldering Iron Controller for Hakko 907
      • Outdoor Thermometer / Hygrometer
      • The hakko t12 controller
  • ve6cmm commented on sfrwmaker's instructable The hakko t12 controller5 months ago
    The hakko t12 controller

    Great job. Your controller looks like it will perform much better than the Weller that I have, and it does a pretty good job. Yours I think will provide better control. Also, I am glad that you got rid of the DIN connector for the probe. These are a problem after a few years. I have changed all of mine to XLR connectors, but your connector will work just as well and for less money. Keep up the great work.

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  • ve6cmm commented on sfrwmaker's instructable The Hakko T126 months ago
    The Hakko T12

    A nice refinement would be automatic shutoff after 30 minutes of so (maybe adjustable) of non-use. I have a Hakko without this, and a Weller with this feature. It can save a lot of tips from failing due to forgetting to turn off your iron. I have a large, crowded work space and it is difficult to turn everything off whern I pack up for the evening, day, whatever. Just a thought, and a very nice instructable.

    Hi,Weller, I think, monitors the tip temperature for a deep dip which is caused by the iron being put to use and thus requiring more power to get the tip up to temperature. Just a few degrees of a drop should be more than sufficient. I am a hardware guy, not software although I have been known to write some BASIC code, and it would seem to me that it would be reasonably simple to add this. Your followers will love you if you, or one of them can implement this feature.All in all, this is a terrific Instructable. Keep up the good work!!!

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  • Dual axis solar tracker with online energy monitor

    There was an article similar to this in Popular Electronics in the late 60's or early 70's. It was all analog, used a wheatstone bridge (if I remember correctly) and H-bridges to drive the motors. Super simple and reliable. The sensors were photocells on a flat board with two pieces of PCB shielding each photocell from the others. The idea was that when the sun was fully illuminating all the photocells, the system would stop moving. It worked well and was simple following the KISS engineering principle. I am surprised at how complicated things have become to do simple things in the last few years!Don't get me wrong, I think this project is terrific.

    Hi Canyonman,You could adapt this to track satellites as the concept is the same, however the detection of the satellite and keep it centered would be difficult. You might want to look up radiosonde equipment to do this. I worked on one system many years ago that would follow radiosonde balloons for miles. The concept is the same, just different.

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