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Having been camping since I was a boy, I've gained much experience in preparing for such events. Through this experience, I have developed a list of basic gear I bring so I will "be prepared" (BSA motto) if I am caught in a survival situation.

Please note, these items will not keep you comfortable, they will keep you alive. Feel free to add or change any of these items to suit your specific needs. As you gain more experience, you will begin to learn what does and doesn't work for you, and can adjust accordingly.

Step 1: Knife.

The number one most important thing I make sure to bring is a knife. They have so many uses in every day camp activities and life in general. If you find yourself in a survival situation, your chances of survival are infinitely increased with a knife. I always have a pocket knife on me for everyday use and camping.

Fixed blade knives are ideal. They are more durable and resilient than folding knives as they do not have mechanical movement. They are also better for cutting large objects such as branches. Folding knives are great for a backup and less demanding tasks.

Uses:
- cutting rope
- creating weapons
- opening packages
- boredom relief
- creating fire starters (ie: bow drill)
- building emergency shelters (cutting branches, cutting tarp, etc)
- cutting cloth for bandages (if you don't have a first aid kit)
- cutting bandages
- so much more; you discover many more uses through experience

Knife maintenance:

- If your knife becomes dirty during use, be sure to clean if off before you put it in your pocket. Ideally you would use a damp towel or rag, but if that is not readily available, I wipe it off on my pant leg. Never leave your knife wet as it may rust.

- Before I leave for a camping trip, I always check to make sure my knife is sharp. This will keep you safe during usage as you will not have to apply extra force in order to cut things. Dull tools are dangerous!

- Be sure that your knife blade is not loose (if it is a folding knife). Folding knives can loosen over time, and this dangerous. If your knife becomes loose, there should be a screw which attaches your blade to the knife housing. Just tighten this screw.

General safety:

- Don't cut toward yourself

- Make sure people are out of your "blood circle". This is the area within range of your knife in hand while your arm is extended.


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Thank you everybody who is commenting, particularly those sharing tips and experience. Viewers will really benefit from all of your help! This kind of interaction is what makes the Instructables community so great, and I truly appreciate it :)
what i love """"""everybody who is commenting, particularly those sharing tips and experience. Viewers will really benefit from all of your help! This kind of interaction is what makes the Instructables community so great""""""""
What do you mean?
<p>He's applauding your comment about what you LIKE in the Instructables community. You wrote a valuable Instructable, then applauded those who added beneficial information to it by giving the benefit of their own experience. </p><p>Good job!</p>
<p>I have built a few different packs for different purposes. I have a day pack set-up with what I'd need should an outdoor outing go bad in some way forcing me to spend an unplanned night or more outdoors along with managing minor to moderate injury. I have a get home bag, in case I was 10-50 miles from home and stranded by a natural disaster, or such forcing me to walk home. I have a bug out or extended survival pack set-up to hopefully have all I need to survive days or weeks in the outdoors and even to be a good start if it was a very long term situation. All three packs have the stuff on this list, plus Fire, Water Purification, Food and some sleep gear. </p><p>For Fire in a more simple and light pack a mini bic lighter is fine, but I prefer 2-3 means of making fire, plus 1 or 2 kinds of tinder tinder. WetFire tinder is great, but you can use dryer lint or cotton balls with vaseline rubbed on them too. I just pack an empty pill bottle full. For a second fire starter I use a Ferro rod with striker.</p><p>For Water Purification aquapur or Oasis tabs are light and pretty cheap, even cheaper is a small vial of bleach. My more comprehensive packs have a Lifestraw or Sawyer mini filter kit. </p><p>For Food, I carry at minimum a couple Clif Bars and some Sport Beans. My bigger packs have ER bars from Quake Care.</p><p>My day pack has a compact Bivy sack down in the bottom. My other packs would be accompanied at all times by a heavy wool blanket bed roll and/or a compact dri-down sleeping bag.</p><p>I have also added a folding saw, hatchet, extra knife, multi-tool, Scotch eyed auger, wire etc in my big bag. If I had the luxury of bugging out by vehicle, I pile in more tools. You can make a lot with a few basic tools in the wilderness, it's really hard to make the tools if you don't have them. </p><p>Take a partner or at least a good dog if at all possible. </p>
The knife I find particularly helpful but some of the items you mentioned are for hiking &amp; getting out of emergency situations. I intend to disappear into the wild for good. Don't ask me why, its too long a list. I am tired of everything. Would sum it up.<br>Can you please make up an essential list just for me?<br>*btw, it is my first time. I am a city life person all my life. Don't discourage me just your best advice. I don't really care if I make it out alive.<br>Thank you.
<p>What you're planning to do is a very long process, I as well have been undertaking the journey towards attempting this goal, what you need to do first is learn, learn as much as you can, just getting up and leaving will be your downfall, not knowing anything before you leave will destroy you, watch the movie &quot;Into The Wild&quot; whilst I respect and sometimes even idolize Christopher for what he did he was way too under prepared and he died because of it, he was simply trying to live for a few months in the wild and he didn't survive, think about what could happen to you if you expect to live in the wild indefinitely. Living in the wild is no easy task, you need to understand a lot more than you do currently, you sir have just read a list of items needed and you're going to take everything said in it as truth without any knowledge whatsoever (whilst this list is brilliant relying on it could kill you), if you're serious about this don't just ask for a list instead learn as much as you can and when you understand what you need to know that's when you'll be closer to undertaking the journey. If you just read a few articles, grab gear and leave, you will not survive for long, surviving in the wild is no easy feat. If you're still on board and understand that you need to learn a lot before attempting your goal, then I applaud you for taking this seriously and if you need someone to talk with then you can email me at david.trinder1@gmail.com </p>
<p>You may contact me as well, Thomas.b.Fiesel@gmail.com</p><p>I am an eagle scout, i've been learning this for many years, and i only now see how much of a fool i would have been to have attempted this when i thought of it many years ago. I share your sentiments, I would like to be able to cut and run as well, but my duties lie amongst men. I was a teacher (troop guide) for several years in my unit, i can say this much, knowing about and knowing OF survival are two different things entirely. Knowing about= read it somewhere, knowing OF= having read it and done the tasks under supervision until they are reflex memory. I know your pain, i'm six-thousand miles away, and i know your pain, search within, you've still got a lot of fight left in you if you're willing to attempt what you propose, call out to God when u have no one to turn to, he will NOT abandon you. you are loved, i can't even read your name, and yet you're a brother to me. take the time to learn the skills required, things will get better, ask and you will be answered, knock and the door will open. if there's anything i can do to help u, ask. need a prayer? ask. need tips, tricks, or general advice? ask. i'd hate to see someone throw away their life because they were not prepared. I can not count the times i've wanted it all to end, just one thought came to me time after time,&quot;there is hope for me yet, 'cause God's not finished with me yet!&quot; it kept the spark of what was left of my will to live going. Ask!</p>
Thank you so much. I will definitely be in touch with you. You have no idea how much it means to me now having someone share his thoughts, experience &amp; advice with me.<br>I am already on board &amp; on my way. Just got down the train at the end of the line. Nothing here just a dead town.
<p>My friend. This is a very dangerous task for the unskilled. learn to forage, to hunt, to make things from nothing. I would recommend either a USMC K-BAR (8-inch) or a Cold Steel, Steel tiger. the steel tiger can be used to gut fish and game, clear away the underbrush, etc. as it is a hooked blade. Learn from a pro (i.e. not me). water bottle needs to be made of metal, you can use it to make char cloth. your primary shelter will be the clothes on your back. I hope this gets to you in time. boil your water, and cook meats througholy.</p>
<p>also, a 12\-inch by 12-inch piece of cheesecloth may save your life. use it to filter out large particulate from water before boiling it</p>
<p>The top knife is the one that is with you when you require it, as the popular saying goes. The liners have been milled out somewhat to lessen the weight, and at 3.75 ounces the knife is very light overall.</p>
<p>As a boy scout I think this is great, I added matches, a small cup sized pot and fishing line with a hook. That plus the original pack is enough for being lost a week. </p>
<p>I've got a 15$ Paracord bracelet for free <a href="http://the-natural-treatment.com/Paracord-bracelet.php" rel="nofollow">HERE</a>.</p>
<p>awesome tips bro :)</p>
<p>A CD is a nice signaling device. Mainly because you can look through the hole in the middle to see where the beam of light ended up. That makes it easy to signal people.</p>
<p>Great idea! (Just like a signal mirror!) So if you lose your signal mirror but have a CD (or intentionally take one with you--good idea!) you can still readily signal aircraft, etc.</p>
<p>Jeans as trousers is a poor idea, once we they're notoriously difficult to dry. As kids we were always advised to NEVER wear jeans when camping or hiking for that very reason. They'd be equally detrimental in a survival situation. </p>
<p>Agreed. Every camping trip I ever went on, they advised us to either wear 'Scout Pants' made of nylon, although I preferred Ripstop Canvas cargo pants (nylon-cotton blend). They took a bit longer to dry out, but the bigger pockets meant I could have more of my emergency kit on my body if I had to dump the pack for some reason. Like falling into a river while crossing it (And remember, if the backpack attaches to you with buckles, unbuckle before crossing the river. Losing the backpack to the water is better than drowning).</p>
<p>Amazing. I will be sure to take all of this when I go backpacking and camping.</p>
<p>After searching for some inspiration and ideas for survival items for a desert setting, I came across this article which is 101 items for survival in all climates. I can't think of anything that's not on the list, so I thought I would share it: http://thegentlemanhack.com/knowledge-skills/survival/101-survival-items/</p>
Definitely not the best, didn't include a folding saw/hatchet, tarp, ductape, water filtration system (ex. life straw), all the clothes were cotton making them hard to dry, and a fire striker/ tinder box kit so you don't have to spend time making a fire bow which is much harder
Does anybody know the fire starting trick where you put pottasium permangenate crystals on a piece of Paper and add glycerine before you bundle it up to use as a fire starter?<br>
<p>It's not exactly a trick. Just a chemical exothermic reaction. Works everytime if you pour the right proportions. I've done it in the backyard a few times.</p><p>But you should follow Terry.carter advice and check the video ;)</p>
<p>Yes. If you want to see it in action, just google matchless fire kit video. King of Random has a very nice video of it.</p>
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<p>A Great Place to find Survival Tools, resource you need to survive and thrive in any situation. I found this discount code. Use this code &quot;PD10&quot;and save 10%. <a href="http://patriotdeals.com/coupon" rel="nofollow">http://patriotdeals.com/coupon</a></p>
it is spelt toque by English Canadians and tuque by French Canadians. And we never call it a beanie.
But what if u have these items and u are still voted off thr island??!! Lol
But what if u have these items and u are still voted off thr island??!! Lol
B
<p>Great Enstructable!</p>
Love it, thank you
Nothing to make fire with? Or did i miss some?
<p>can anyone email me with the answer to this?</p><p>i have 3ft of paracord but can only make 2 bracelets. how come i made 4?</p>
<p>hey darman12 im gonna b making a survival video on YouTube. b sure to check it out! my channel is called Ebony Saddington</p>
<p>paracord bracelets are good because you can undo the quikly and easily and paracord is very strong and durable!</p>
<p>550 cord is extremely useful. i am in Scouts and we all made paracord bracelets with 550. <em>So useful!!!</em></p>
<p>I just want to point out a few things that you missed that are unbelievably critical. </p><p>A) fire-starting kit</p><p>B) Multi-tool</p><p>C) Lantern/heavy duty flashlight - you showed a pic but didn't talk about it</p><p>D) Rations/FOOD- extremely important</p><p>E) Water purifier- even if you have water with you, that doesn't matter, you will eventually run out and need more</p><p>F) Sleeping gear- very important, I highly reccommend a bedroll, they are small and compact</p><p>That's about it. Thought you would want to see this- Darman12</p>
<p>I just want to point out a few things that you missed that are unbelievably critical. </p><p>A) fire-starting kit</p><p>B) Multi-tool</p><p>C) Lantern/heavy duty flashlight - you showed a pic but didn't talk about it</p><p>D) Rations/FOOD- extremely important</p><p>E) Water purifier- even if you have water with you, that doesn't matter, you will eventually run out and need more</p><p>F) Sleeping gear- very important, I highly reccommend a bedroll, they are small and compact</p><p>That's about it. Thought you would want to see this- Darman12</p>
<p>Thank you, darman12 for the instructable. My only complaint is that it is not what I am looking for, but then again, that's not your fault! </p><p>Thanks again darman!</p>
<p>Survival tools are so important for those who like to travel...I've seen here a lot of useful survival things..look at this http://exprogress.com/index.php/survival/the-adventurer-survival-kit-knife.html?___SID=U it saves space and can be useful in emergency situations </p>
<p>where can I but that EXACT compass?</p>
<p>We recently wrote a similar article at <a href="http://survivalseverything.com/index.php/2015/08/27/10-items-you-need-to-survive-in-the-wilderness/" rel="nofollow">http://survivalseverything.com/index.php/2015/08/2...</a></p><p>A couple of our items are different but we really like this list</p>
You do say &quot;dont want to build a survivalman roof out of leaves as you could be hunting or starting a fire&quot; but you dont list the fire starting equipment here. My pack has cotton wool and flint and steel in it.
As a Bushcraft instructor I still run on the rules of run with the skills and lessen the kit. Personal record 1 week with 2 items
What where they?<br>Ive done 2 days with Victorinox Woodsman and an iPhone 3g.

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