Combine a derelict shopping cart with a bicycle for a ride with ample cargo capacity. This is a nice way to save a shopping cart and a bike that might otherwise end up in a landfill. It is quite the head turner but not a good corner turner.

Any mention of this project must provide a link to www.zieak.com with credit to Ryan McFarland.

Step 1: Gather materials

You will need:

A bicycle
Shopping cart
Socket set
Hex key set
Dremel tool
Utility knife
Zip ties

A note on shopping carts: Please don't steal them. This one happened to be floating around our downtown area for over a week before I grabbed it. The bicycle is almost ten years old and still works fine but I just bought the bike shop in town so suddenly have access to plenty of cycling materials.
<p>First corner----------------------- disaster!</p>
<p>Put some shoes on you're scaring me XD</p>
<p>I think that if I were to make this I would modify the wheels to be a little bit larger like wheel barrow wheels that air up to help on the pot holes and the ease of movement. But other than that this is an AWESOME idea. </p>
<p>Big Bad Baby Twinkle<br>&lt;-- sez &quot;This is a GREAT Kat Fud Transporter!&quot;</p>
<p>I have to do this to go shopping with my son Bat-Boy</p>
<p>It seems to me that finding a cart that is not broke would be the toughest part of this build : ) I would totally go shopping with this thing...</p>
<p>Great bike for family!</p><p>I love it!))</p>
<p>I laughed pretty hard when I saw this XD but if you need to transport things, I'm sure this does the trick!</p><p>I'm curious, how is the ride with this? Is it smooth, or really bumpy since the cart has hard wheels?</p><p>A suggestion: You might get a better turning experience if you get a cart with free-turning wheels in the back, like at Ikea. I love those carts, they can go any direction, including sideways!</p><p>Oh, I love your furry assistant. I know my kitty is always very helpful :P</p>
<p>Nice idea, wouldn't suit me though</p>
<p>Funny, my friends and I actually built something like this. Instead of mounting at the handles, we fixed the forks onto the bottom rod of the cart, and welded the two together. For the handles, we really just took them off, and use the shopping cart handles to steer. </p>
<p>Oh, the picture is before the handle removal</p>
<p>so why would you make this reg bike is better</p>
fat cat( or is he just fluffy?)<br />
<p>the cat is thinking. hmm minion i need u to fill my dishes now!!!!!!</p>
Both!<br />
Just like my dog<br />
same here.. the &lt;&lt;&lt; the pic is deceiving...
pretty sweet
I don't think this would be good in my area with snow..
same here...
Thanks for the idea. My cart had a bar above the rack on the bottom. It was the right size that the forks could hook onto it. I kept the handlebars and strapped them to the handle. I also tied the forks to the cart at all different places. The forks being hooked on the cart makes for very easy turns.
I love your ingenuity but would not touch this design, looks pretty dangerous to me.<br> Seems to me you are comprimising the ridability of the bike and your safety by using the shopping trolley on the front end. If the basket is what you want then wouldn't it be safer to hack the unroadworthy trolley wheels and frame off, get a short axle and put some bicycle wheels (or lightweight bigger diameter wheels) onto the basket, then fashion a tube hitch and use it as a bicycle trailer?<br> Probem with this design is that shopping trolleys are relatively heavy, and only designed for short trips on smoothish surfaces. For anything to do with bikes you want something as lightweight as possible.
The smaller diameter of the shipping cart's wheels make this unit unable to roll over any obstacle higher than about 1-1/2 to 2 inches. A temporary roadwork trench could send the rider end over end. <br> Years ago, when people still returned shopping carts back to the front of the store, I was doing just that, and because I was in a hurry, I was moving at a pretty good trot, and I hit a nicely cut little trench cut into the pavement of the parking lot, filled with asphalt to a couple of inches below the rest of the pavement. The handle of the cart got rammed back into my stomach, pinning my hands to my stomach, and I went head first into the cart as it went end over end with me in it. <br> Having entertained my friends during my misspent youth by taking head-first tumbles down staircases and walking away as if nothing happened, I was well prepared for the shopping-cart mishap, and didn't get hurt, but for those without specialized skills for rolling around on pavement, this sort of thing could be painful, especially with the higher speed of a bicycle.<br> This bike requires more alertness to conditions than most, and while it might be OK for short trips, ti wouldn't be good for commuting. Safety-wise, this project has &quot;Don't try this at home&quot; written all over it. But other-wise, it shows some great, um, imagination.
So is there some special class you have to take to learn how to roll on pavement or do you just learn on your own? Because I think I can join you in knowing how to roll on pavement, I've fallen a lot too.
I love the look of this project, but was going to mention the safety if it was not already said. The ingenuity is great. <br> <br>@cubesquaredtothe1 there are classes, but I think a lot of people just learn. I took a couple Aikido classes a while back, and am comfortable with my ability to roll on pavement from a standing position.
Thanks, because my knowledge of rolling on pavement is limited to personal experience and I was kind of confused on the topic.
Build it, Build it, Build it, Build it!
The bike looks like it is extremely vulnerable to irregularities in the road, particularly cracks and potholes . And I must deplore the fact that he is riding without a helmet, especially on an experimental vehicle
From what I can gather, to increase stability while steering the fork would have to be vertical so that the shopping cart would remain on the ground throughout the turn. This could be addressed by using a larger rear tire and a smaller front tire. Granted, that could pose potential problems with the pedals contacting the ground. The only vertical forked bikes I've seen are portable bikes, which would result in even more strange looks from passersby.
junior jus is my farv
thats the best idea EVER!
How does it like potholes?
It does not like potholes - not at all!
Oh my gosh. I will make one and drive my friends around town! Genius.
Have you tried walking round the store with it yet?
I'd hate to be riding this deathtrap when the little wheels attempt to navigate a sudden change in road surface. Rolling resistance is inversely proportional to wheel diameter. <br><br>Haven't you ever tried to push a shopping cart over a rock of only a fraction of an inch, oh I'm sorry, several millimeters in cross section?<br><br>Something to do with trigonometry and force vectors and all that.
Very cool idea. Maybe if you flip the handlebar stem upside down it would fix the cornering issue.
Dude! That pic just kills me.<br><br>You could put just a single larger wheel under the cart, maybe like from a wheel barrow with bolt on brackets.<br><br>Cool idea.
this is awesome but i have one idea.<br><br>on many shopping carts the wheels are real cheap and squeak a lot. maybe theirs a way to upgrade the wheels with some sort of small bike or training wheel<br><br>
It is convenient.
wott! what a brilliant idea!! haha
good idea,how about a folding granny cart?i have spare front 26in wheel want to explore tricycle option.
OK y'all!<br>lets settle some disputes here,<br>don't go to a store and take their brand new shopping carts. Go inside and request to speak to the owner or a manager and ask if they have any older shopping carts that they can sell or give you or a way to acquire one. Some may give you a few to choose from while others will say no. There is probably one out stuck in a lake, rusting. Go and help your community and pull it out and put it to use! If those aren't options and there isn't a dump near you, weld/make one! I am sure you can learn a new skill, to weld! it would probably be lots of tacking, but a good way to practice! or maybe you are confident in your lashing abilities and the strength of bamboo and make one that way. Maybe you make one out of composite material! the simplest way would be to form it to the shape you want or to attach the sheets to form a box and drill holes in it. There are so many alternatives!<br>and as to him with no helmet and flip flops, it isn't the safest thing but there is no reason to argue about it.<br>also it would be very innovative to attach the handle of the cart to a sets of wheels with a rod to make them turn! like how go carts turn.
ughhh..... where do you buy a shopping cart
go no ebay duck <br>
They are quite expensive to buy. But try asking around at different shops - many will have ones that have been damaged that only require an hour with a hydraulic jack and some pipe to straighten out. I think I have snagged three or four now from the local dump.
Ok, this is an interesting project, but does it have to be the cover photo for bicycle mods? Guy riding a bicycle with no helmet and flip-flops? Of the times I've crashed, I was glad to be wearing a helmet and bike shoes. Let's set a good example.
I see no problem with the photo, if he wants to wear flip flops and not use a helmet that is up to him. I think most people will understand that this rig is probably not going to be going high speeds, and thus I would feel comfortable not wearing a helmet while riding this. Of course there is still the worry of getting hit by a car, but we also have that worry as a pedestrian, so unless you want walkers to wear helmet and &quot;bike shoes&quot; I think the argument is pointless.
i agree
for longevity and a smoother ride i would replace the shopping cart wheels with good quality kick scooter wheels and bearings also. its amazing the smoothness of some of those things<br>also i would weld the back flap on the cart closed and remove the child seat. and for a more permanent fixture to the forks maybe a metal rod secured through some holes drilled in the carts frame and locked on with some nuts or bent around the cart frame and welded on?

About This Instructable


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Bio: I like making things out of items that would have otherwise been discarded. Check out my other projects!
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