This is a flying Captain America shield that you can make out of duct tape and cardboard. Make a couple of these and you can battle it out with your friends Captain America-style!

I had two goals in mind with this project: 1) that the finished shield could be tossed around safely and actually fly stable like a giant Frisbee, and 2) that it could be replicated by almost anyone, independent of their current crafting skills.

For this project I made a couple of different flying shield prototypes. After some experimenting, I eventually reached a design that flew really well . . . and now I'm excited to share it!

I've included a PDF with all the pattern pieces that are required to make this. I worked directly from these finalized pattern pieces to build the finished version of the flying Captain America shield you will see in the following steps and in the video below.

The finished shield is 22.5" in diameter, and weighs 27.5 ounces (780 g). It's hefty, but it flies great. Still, you wouldn't want to knock a little kid in the back of the head with it, but it's certainly a lot safer for throwing around than this version (also made by me).

Here is a video of my flying shield in action:

Step 1: Things you will need

Here is what you will need to make your own Flying Captain America Shield:
  • Print-out of the attached PDF
  • Flat pieces of cardboard, at least 12" wide across the grain. I used thick double-ply cardboard.
  • Duct tape, one roll of each: red, white, blue, and regular
  • 24" of webbing or other suitable material for handles
  • 74" of 3/4" polypropylene rope
  • Cutting mat
  • Utility knife with extra blades (and/or heavy-duty hobby knife with extra blades)
  • Hot glue gun
  • Sharp scissors
  • Marking pen, like a Sharpie
In each step I will go into more detail about the materials and tools used.

About This Instructable


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Bio: I got an old sewing machine when I was just a kid, and I've been hooked on making stuff ever since. My name is ... More »
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