Step 15: Wire feed welders

As said before, much of what applies to stick welding practices also applies to welding with a wire feed unit. A steady hand, the correct angle of the electrode holder (stinger or gun), the correct heat setting, the correct travel speed, etc. are all necessary in both processes.

MIG capable welders are more costly than flux core welders because they include a gauge for regulating the shielding gas flow, a tube around the gun liner for carrying the gas to the gun, and a solenoid valve to start and stop the gas flow when the arc begins and stops. There is also the cost of the gas and a steel bottle to contain it. MIG welders can be used with flux core wire, but flux core welders cannot be outfitted as MIG welders. The advantage of MIG welders is that the welds have a better appearance and better penetration. There is also less cleanup after welding. But, in windy conditions the gas that shields MIG welds can be blown away before it does its job. MIG welding requires very clean steel while flux core welders can dig through some surface impurities to make a good weld. Flux core welders can be used in windy conditions with no problems.

In stick welding attention is given to the length of the arc. With wire feed welding the amount of wire sticking out of the end of the copper welding tip at the end of the welding gun becomes important. See the manual for your welder.

Wire feed welders are much easier to use than stick welders. They do not require the same skill level and amount of practice as stick welding. Some say laying a bead with a wire feed welder is like putting down a bead of toothpaste on a countertop. Almost anyone can do that. But, it is much more difficult to see where you are welding with a wire feed welder. It is not uncommon to wander off of the joint while welding with a wire feed welder. See the next step for three solutions. 

Turn on your wire feed welder and let it run for a minute or so before beginning to weld. 

In order to be sure your weld has good penetration and is not a "cold weld" (weld material laid over the parent metal without any real bonding), look for blue discolorations in the parent metal on both the left and right sides of the weld as a sign of good penetration.

When it is time to stop welding with a stick welder, the weldor simply pulls the electrode away from the steel and the arc stops. Those who are used to stick welders need to learn to release the trigger on the gun before pulling the gun up and away from the steel. Failure to do this results in a couple of inches of wasted electrode wire sticking out of the gun. This must be trimmed before beginning to weld again. 

With my flux core welder I can sometimes begin a new weld without trimming the burned end, but there are other times when an arc will not begin without first trimming the wire to make a fresh new end.

There are some good videos on YouTube for how to do MIG welding.

(The photo is from Bing Images.)

thank u sir<br>
Thank you for looking. In part, I share things like this so I can remember everything later when I forget something.
could you post next about to make our own circuits or design our own circuit.(only if you like)
<p>Falstad has a circuit applet anyone can use online. With it you can try various circuits to see how different components change them, and whether they work or not. The applet does not include integrated circuit chips, but regular discrete components. Go to falstad (dot) com/circuit.</p><p>The U.S. Navy has a course on electronics. A 1995 version is available for downloading on-line, and is not difficult to find. There are lots of electronics blogs and pages. Learn about basic circuits, like amplifiers. Combine them with other circuits and adapt them to see what you can do with them. </p><p>I know only a very little about electronics. </p>
thanks for your replying my question
what things are used for gas welding
<p>You need a good torch set with gauges, hose, and tanks. Many an arc welder costs less money to get started. A pair of goggles is sufficient and less costly than the nice self-darkening hoods needed for arc welding.</p>
<p>Thank you for taking the time to post this. I have been welding for about a year plus: self-taught from reading books, talking with real weldors, youtube videos and online articles like this and of course the best practice - actually welding. This is an excellent article. I really liked your heat warping diagram and the way you explained that. I knew there was a better way to approach this problem and I will implement some principles you made clear. I noticed you are in Vancouver - I'm not far, just over the Glenn Jackson Bridge in Portland. Thanks again!</p>
Ben,<br><br>Thank you for your comment. My welding education has been very much like yours. I wanted both to catalog what I had learned for my own record to consult later, and to share it with those who might find it helpful. More welding would certainly help me. But, I do not have unlimited supplies of steel for practice, nor do I have regular projects. <br><br>A few years ago we had purchased our present house not too far from where I-5 and I-205 join together again in the north end of Vancouver. I was attending meetings about four times a year at The Clarion on Airport Way. I rode my bicycle down from our house and got onto the bicycle lanes down the middle of the Glenn-Jackson Bridge. Since we actually moved to Vancouver, an encounter with skin cancer has caused me to cut back on exposure to sunlight and bicycling. <br><br>It might be fun to meet sometime.
This is welding of mild steel. Could you please comment on its quality? Thanks.
<p>I am not qualified to comment. Perhaps some others with more experience can comment more accurately.</p>
<p>Hello every one, I have a welder that gets hot and stop passing current (stop welding) after less than a minute of welding what should I do to fix it ? !!</p>
For starters, I would put an appropriate meter on the cord that pugs into the outlet and check the current draw. How does that compare with the rating on the label? If the actual current draw is considerably higher than the rated current draw, you will need to determine why. At the least something could be frayed and shorting. At the worst the transformer windings could be shorted, and that could require a replacement. Unless the problem is something simple and easy to fix, you probably need to take it to someone who repairs that make.
<p>Ok Phil, once I am home I will try and open it, and try to figure what's the problem with it, maybe as you said it's the transformer winding I think ! <br>Thanks a lot!</p>
<p>if you can check against a working copy of your welder, you can make a precise measurement of the resistance in each winding and compare the two welders. I doubt you can do much other than replace the transformer, if that is truly the problem. What type and make of welder is it?</p>
<p>Just want to share the best welding service I tried so far. It's <br>Kaymor and you can visit them at <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pages/Kaymor-Machining-Welding-Ltd/466120660094116?ref=ts&fref=ts" rel="nofollow">https://www.facebook.com/pages/Kaymor-Machining-Welding-Ltd/466120660094116?ref=ts&amp;fref=ts</a> <br>and they even offer this <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Bor6nv7FI4" rel="nofollow">https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Bor6nv7FI4</a> <br>!!! Amazing! Just want to share.</p><p> <br>Kaymor Machining &amp; Welding Ltd.</p><p><a href="https://www.facebook.com/pages/Kaymor-Machining-Welding-Ltd/466120660094116" rel="nofollow">Kaymor Machining &amp; <br>Welding Ltd.</a></p>
Invaluable!<br> <br> Found this via your new &quot;<a href="http://www.instructables.com/id/Never-Again-Weld-a-Crooked-Bead/" rel="nofollow">Never Weld a crooked Bead</a>&quot; instructable. Keep up the good work! And Thanks again!
<p>Just want to share the best welding service I tried so far. It's <br>Kaymor and you can visit them at <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pages/Kaymor-Machining-Welding-Ltd/466120660094116?ref=ts&fref=ts" rel="nofollow">https://www.facebook.com/pages/Kaymor-Machining-Welding-Ltd/466120660094116?ref=ts&amp;fref=ts</a> <br>and they even offer this <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Bor6nv7FI4" rel="nofollow">https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Bor6nv7FI4</a> <br>!!! Amazing! Just want to share.</p><p> <br>Kaymor Machining &amp; Welding Ltd.</p><p><a href="https://www.facebook.com/pages/Kaymor-Machining-Welding-Ltd/466120660094116" rel="nofollow">Kaymor Machining &amp; <br>Welding Ltd.</a></p>
<p>Thank you for your comment. I am sorry I missed it until now. If you have ever seen The Red Green Show on PBS, you know the expression, &quot;We're all in this together!&quot;</p>
<p>Just want to share the best welding service I tried so far. It's <br>Kaymor and you can visit them at <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pages/Kaymor-Machining-Welding-Ltd/466120660094116?ref=ts&fref=ts" rel="nofollow">https://www.facebook.com/pages/Kaymor-Machining-Welding-Ltd/466120660094116?ref=ts&amp;fref=ts</a> <br>and they even offer this <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Bor6nv7FI4" rel="nofollow">https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Bor6nv7FI4</a> <br>!!! Amazing! Just want to share.</p><p> <br>Kaymor Machining &amp; Welding Ltd.</p><p><a href="https://www.facebook.com/pages/Kaymor-Machining-Welding-Ltd/466120660094116" rel="nofollow">Kaymor Machining &amp; <br>Welding Ltd.</a></p>
Just a small point of reference on image usage: &quot;Bing Images&quot; and &quot;Google Images&quot; are not the content sources, merely the catalyst in which you found said images. Please do a little extra click and give credit to the actual sources- especially on an open community concept. <br> <br>
I really appreciate this! I tried learning how to weld on my own, but have no idea what I'm doing. I've been looking for a company that does <a href="http://profabcorp.com/divisions/" rel="nofollow">welding in Red Deer</a>, but didn't really know what to look for in a welding company. I found this way helpful! Thank you for sharing.
In all reality limiting welds to &lt;=3in would be ideal to prevent warping
I've heard you should not put the cable over your shoulder because of the magnetic field or something. I think I read it in some other 'ible and a welding safety guide too.
its not so much emf as if your cable has a nick in the insulation and you bump up against a grounded piece of metal it will give you quite a shock. most dc welders (as far as i know, i could be wrong) don't put out that much emf.
I suppose that could be. I do not know. I probably do that five times a year and then for only a few minutes each time. I probably have more to worry about from my cell phone, which I do not use very often, either. Perhaps some others will be able to add something on this. Thank you for looking and for commenting.
I did find a<a href="http://www.millerwelds.com/resources/communities/mboard/archive/index.php/t-21949.html"> forum discussion</a> on hanging the welding cable over an arm or a shoulder. Most of the concern related to becoming tangled in the cables as a tripping hazard. There was some concern related to electromagnetic fields and heart pacemakers. There was also a concern for possible yet unknown health effects. One person posting quoted some guidelines from Lincoln that discouraged hanging cables over one's shoulder, but no explanation or reason was given.
I'm not too concerned about all the hype over long term effects of EMFs in cell phones and microwave ovens yet (the studies are mostly inconclusive or sketchy); what I read said that doing that could stop your heart. It didn't mention pacemakers specifically, so I'm not sure if your heart would be at risk without a pacemaker.
My father had a small electrical business. I was his helper during high school. The danger was always considered to be an electrical current that flowed across the chest cavity and the heart, either from one arm to the other, or from one arm to the other leg. Only a surprisingly few milliamps were needed to be fatal. But, that is much different from a nearby EMF.<br><br>While the heart beats as a result of electrical activity duplicated in a pacemaker, an EMF would, I believe, be unlikely to produce an arresting current flow across the heart. I simply do not know if a heart could be stopped by a close proximity EMF. It would seem the presence of a metal would be required. Perhaps someone reading this has more and better information.
I found <a href="http://www.magnopro-usa.com/research/Electromagnetic-Fields-and-the-Heart.pdf">this article</a> on the effects of EMFs on living tissue. It does not sound like an EMF from a welder operating on 60 Hz alternating current is likely to stop a heart, but it may produce tissue changes over time that result in heart disease. Other hits mentioned type 3 diabetes caused by EMFs.
Phil strikes yet again like a Thunderbolt from on high! Now I have to ask, you do know that you can tap start stick arcs too right? Match dragging is total rookie material. I was done with that stuff by my third bead.<br> <br> What bugs me the most when I weld is a phenomenon I like to call &quot;back lighting&quot;, where reflected light off my lens makes it more difficult for me to see while I am welding. I have an extra leather bib for my summer welding jacket that I throw over the top of my hood to cut it down.<br> <br> Although doing so does tend to make my hood fog up fast. So I should invent the hood awning and retire a multi gazillionare!<br> <br> My spark box:<br> <br> <br>
Color me a rookie. I tried the tapping method a couple of times and always stuck the rod, so I stayed with what I know. Also, this Instructable is for someone who is just beginning, so the easiest method seems OK.
I've been giving this a bit of thought lately and I have come to the conclusion that my machine just may have a bit better an arc starter in it than most welders usually have due to the fact that is a TIG/Stick welder.<br><br>The engineers at Miller looked at each other and said you know if we throw a heavy lead on this puppy it ought to stick weld OK too. The marketers smiled and nodded.<br><br>I mean sometimes all I have to do is get the rod close and I'm ignited. But this is the only machine I've ever stick welded with so are they all like that?
most stick tig combos have what is called hot start which jacks up amperage like 15 to 20% to make starting electrodes easier. regardless i still preferred my dialarc to my sycrowave for stick welding until i was given a xmt 350 that does mig tig and stick. match stike technique is the only technique i use in the shop for lighting off my electrodes
Running DC stick weld is very easy to tap start. With AC current you are fighting the POS/NEG 60Hz switching and the rod wants to stick. I think the old Tombstone Lincolns were AC.
Yes, those Lincoln welders are AC. Many guys who want to weld are doing it on a budget and do not feel they can afford or justify the extra cost of a DC welder or DC conversion unit. Right or wrong, a lot of fellows will struggle on with AC. Thank you for your comment.
Welding is a lot like taking a trip, you can travel in luxury first class, or ride in steerage. In the end I suppose we all get to the same place, but perceptions of the experience may differ radically.<br><br>With effort one can alter their perspective, but not all are amenable to the techniques involved. Within us all is the power to make our dreams real. What many lack though is the will to persevere. Will don't work cheap either!<br><br>
My welder must have a decent arc starter in it. I have no problems tapping AC or DC.
It is nice that your welder is TIG ready. My Miller is about 1975 vintage. It has a crank wheel on top for infinitely variable amperage settings, unlike the famous Lincoln &quot;tombstone&quot; welder that has a few click settings. I will have to try the tap method again while playing with the amperage output.
Well I sold my first MIG welder, a Tractor Supply Company branded Campbell Hausfeld. It NEVER fed the wire smoothly. I bought a new Hobart Handler 140 (120 VAC) and boy what a difference! TSC brand was $150...Hobart $500 and well worth it! That sucker lays down a smooth bead like warm butter on hot toast. I'm building an anvil out of railroad rail and welded a 3/8&quot; plate on top and it went together very nicely. Yes you do get what you pay for.
Thank you for your comment. That is a lesson I know in my head, but I have to keep on learning it in practice over and over.
Nice job and great info. Now if I can just find the crumgrudgeon who jacked my welder so I can use some if your info!
Ouch! I want to assure you I am not the one who stole your welder. Thank you for your comment. Life is strange. Twice people tried to give me a welder, both legally owned by the giver. Each time I said I had no place to put one or need to use one. Little did I know that one day that would all change and I would buy a Miller Thunderbolt 220 volt stick welder exactly like the one someone tried once to give me. I hope someone you meet soon wants to give you a legally owned welder. Thank you for looking.
Are you sure that wasn't you? Ha ha. I think I obviously need to move to your neighborhood. Better to have them offered than taken away. But I can always wait for the oil fields to bust again and there will be plenty being practically given away by influx of &quot;wanna be&quot; welders flooding the oil fields tryin to make a buck :) I'll keep your instructable in mind for that day :)
I would encourage a move to my neighborhood, except that the first welder offered to me was in Ohio and the second was in Tennessee. I now live in Idaho, but will move to Washington state in a few months when I retire. If you wish to have a good way to remember my Instructable, you can always click on it as a Favorite and it will link on your personal information page at Instructables. <br><br>I never actually saw the first welder. A much older friend had used it for years in his shop where he built and repaired truck bodies. He told me it weighed 300 pounds. I made a troubled attempt at using the second welder once, which was my first encounter with an arc welder. It belonged to a school at which my wife taught and the assistant principal was close to a friend. For whatever reason he was looking to get rid of things they did not really use. At the time I did occasionally make use of their oxy-acetylene welder. I was much more familiar with those at the time. Had I known what I know now, I would have jumped at having the second welder for myself.
Oh any of those neighborhoods sounds like a good place to live compared to the crazy climate here. Been wanting to move to Colorado but can't get my hubby to retire and go quite yet. Although selling our house in the boom would be so much better. I have wanted to get out of this sulfur filled desert as long as I van remember and I truly believe my hubby could start up his own business wherever we went. Course we plan on bringing my mother with us, so anywhere there are mountains, trees and a summer under 120&deg; would be good. He was learning to weld some from a friend and I know the guy offered to sell his his welding truck. That would have probably been a great opportunity since there are plenty of fences and cattle guards to be mended or built anywhere there is open land. Just no one out here wants to deal with the summer heat (except maybe the goobers who signed on to that show about rough necks, and they come out here in droves with no clue what they are in for just money). Now I'm just whining about living here between &quot;the land of enchantment&quot; and &quot;a whole other country&quot; - so where does this make this place? Purgatory? Ha ha. <br>Marking this is a favorite now and hope to learn much more from what you have written. Wish I had the technical writing skills. Would love to apply it to my garbled and jumbled stained glass instructable lol
It sounds like you are living in Arizona. Have you thought about Idaho? There are places where there would be plenty of cattle grates to weld. We can get temps of 105 in the summer, but for only a week or so. I have been to Phoenix in August. The locals were so happy because daytime highs were only 112 instead of 120. I need to look more closely at your stained glass Instructables. I will likely never make anything of stained glass, but would enjoy seeing what you did in detail. <br><br>I am not trained in technical writing, but have always enjoyed explaining things to people so they can understand what I am trying to communicate. I have spent the last 40 years as a Lutheran pastor, so I get plenty of practice working on communication. Probably the trouble I have understanding some people comes from them forgetting that I know nothing about what they are trying to tell me and they need to make it real simple with steps that go in a logical order.
No, but close enough. Visited a brother in law once and realized there was at least one place in the US hotter and drier than here lol. I am on the Texas New Mexico Border, right next to where they wer so kind as to build a nuclear waste dump facility (that hasn't followed regulations since day 1). Another reason NOT to live here. My hubby has been at the Kirby factory here as a machinist for the past 30 years, so it has kept us here through the ups and downs of the surrounding oil fields. But my father came out here as a petroleum engineer so one would think I was accustomed to the climate. The past two years of extreme temps and no rain, and visiting back home in the mountains has got be packing my bags for trees and snow. We did break a few records with the two snows this year at 15 and 20 inches though. I like snow and cooler temps are much better for MS so it would be a healthy move. <br>I should have taken some technical writing in college, but I didn't and looking back regret that. My 1st degree was in nursing (oddly after being a geology major in the beginning). I can explain medical terms and situation well but I think some of the docs I worked with thought I was a bit looney in how I did it. As long as the patient and family understood I would make it work. <br>Since I am a self taught artist it seems I could explain things in a manner others would understand. However, something about doing it in sections with photos and such just throws off the flow. That and I want to get in all the little tips and tricks I have learned by trial and error. <br>This instructable is such much easier to understand and I a would love to learn a thing or two from how you have done it. I think I might print mine off and re-write it after critiquing my own. I wish I would get more comments on mine in the form of criticism just so I could learn from them. <br>I guess I should do that, or get some more of my bathroom remodel done so I have two bathrooms again. Never realize how nice having two is until you are down to just one. <br>Maybe I will get that stained glass one written better before you read it.... That is if time slows down and I catch up :)
I thought you were referring to California as that whole other country. I will try to look at your Instructables and give you some untrained criticism. Usually people commenting at Instructables follow the request to &quot;be nice.&quot; Once in a while someone asks an author to use proper grammar or proper spelling. But, that is about as far as it goes.

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