author
349Instructables15,590,371Views5,126CommentsKnoxville, TennesseeJoined July 17th, 2008
I miss the days when magazines like Popular Mechanics had all sorts of DIY projects for making and repairing just about everything. I am enjoying posting things I have learned and done since I got my first tools. I enjoy studying the Bible and retired after 40 years as a Lutheran pastor. I like to dabble with some electronics projects. I have a wood lathe and a metal lathe, a radial arm saw, a router, and both a 220 volt stick welder and a gas shielded wire feed welder. I appreciate In... Read More »

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1K+ Comments Earned a gold medal
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Make It Move Contest 2017
Contest Winner Runner Up in the Make It Move Contest 2017
Fix & Repair Contest
Contest Winner Runner Up in the Fix & Repair Contest
MacGyver Challenge
Contest Winner Runner Up in the MacGyver Challenge
Metal Contest 2016
Contest Winner First Prize in the Metal Contest 2016
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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Fix a Frozen Concoction Machine1 day ago
    Fix a Frozen Concoction Machine

    Thank you for the note superimposed on the image. Unfortunately, you must remove the bottom as I showed in the steps above. Congratulations on finding the part. The machine shown in the photos has had no use until about a month ago when someone borrowed it for s party. I was not at that party, but the fix shown here held up well.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Curing 2-cycle Engine Problems6 days ago
    Curing 2-cycle Engine Problems

    i listed a link to an on-line diagnostic help in my comment to 86suzuki directly below. It is close to s flow chart. About a month ago I worked on a chainsaw for a friend. Two repair shops told him he almost certainly needed a new metering diaphragm in his carburetor. After I got into the saw I found the diaphragm was fine. The fuel in his saw's tank was more than a year old. After mixing fresh fuel and replacing the old fuel with it, the saw ran great. I mention that because yu never know exactly what you have until you get into the machine. By the way, this chainsaw did not develop full power at first. Then I opened the High circuit mixture screw just a little and it was fine. I would check everything in a logical order, and I would make certain there are no air leaks anywhere in the ...

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    i listed a link to an on-line diagnostic help in my comment to 86suzuki directly below. It is close to s flow chart. About a month ago I worked on a chainsaw for a friend. Two repair shops told him he almost certainly needed a new metering diaphragm in his carburetor. After I got into the saw I found the diaphragm was fine. The fuel in his saw's tank was more than a year old. After mixing fresh fuel and replacing the old fuel with it, the saw ran great. I mention that because yu never know exactly what you have until you get into the machine. By the way, this chainsaw did not develop full power at first. Then I opened the High circuit mixture screw just a little and it was fine. I would check everything in a logical order, and I would make certain there are no air leaks anywhere in the crankcase.

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  • Phil B's instructable A Reed Switch's weekly stats: 8 days ago
    • A Reed Switch
      248 views
      2 favorites
      5 comments
  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable A Reed Switch12 days ago
    A Reed Switch

    John,It sounds like an idea worth pursuing. I needed one reed switch now, and decided to make my own. Unfortunately, another part of the project fell apart, and now I do not need any reed switches. Thank you for your comment.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable A Reed Switch15 days ago
    A Reed Switch

    If I wanted to wait for shipment I could order a batch of reed switches most of which I will never use on the Internet. The $10 reference was to the current variety of reed switch with some auxillary electronics in a package that used to be simpler in design and sell for $3 at a big box store.

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  • Phil B posted an instructable A Reed Switch16 days ago
  • Phil B's instructable Copy Kindle Text's weekly stats: 17 days ago
    • Copy Kindle Text
      107 views
      0 favorites
      0 comments
  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Car Battery Goes Dead After a Few Days20 days ago
    Car Battery Goes Dead After a Few Days

    Thank you for your comment. I am not a professional mechanic and have never owned a VW of any kind. I empathize with you in the problems you are having.I did a little cursory reading sbout electrical problems on the 1998 Beetle. Melted fuses and wiring harnesses, and outright fires, are not infrequent in the complaints. It seems an early sign of problems to come involves a lack of response from the heater/AC fan control. (The fan blows at the #2 setting no matter where the knob is set.) Some had the engine die in traffic, or the horn began to blow during the night with no known stimulus. I did not find your exact problem.The melted fuses and wiring harnesses suggests a heavy unusual current draw. That could also fit with your drained battery. My first thought is something simple, like t...

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    Thank you for your comment. I am not a professional mechanic and have never owned a VW of any kind. I empathize with you in the problems you are having.I did a little cursory reading sbout electrical problems on the 1998 Beetle. Melted fuses and wiring harnesses, and outright fires, are not infrequent in the complaints. It seems an early sign of problems to come involves a lack of response from the heater/AC fan control. (The fan blows at the #2 setting no matter where the knob is set.) Some had the engine die in traffic, or the horn began to blow during the night with no known stimulus. I did not find your exact problem.The melted fuses and wiring harnesses suggests a heavy unusual current draw. That could also fit with your drained battery. My first thought is something simple, like the wiring crosses over a rough metal edge at a body seam and eventually wears through the insulation to cause an electrical short.In step #1 of this Instructable I described how to use an Ammeter to check current draw in a circuit. If you do not have a digital multimeter, Harbor Freight has one for around $5 that is often free with one of their ubiquitous coupons from the Sunday paper or an advertisement in a magazine and a small purchase. Start with the 10 Amp. range just to be safe and work back to the milliamps. ranges to avoid blowing a fuse inside the meter. (I had to go to Amazon to find replacement fuses. They are an odd size.)I would want to know the current draw when the car is parked by the curb, and then with the engine running. Is it higher than 50 to 100 milliamps when nothing is running? If so, I would pull a fuse and check the current draw. Replace the fuse and pull another. You are trying to determine which system has the excessive current draw. Then follow the wires for that system as best you can with your hand looking for any signs insulation is worn or frayed. (If you cannot follow the wire various places, try disconnecting it between the battery and where the wire becomes inaccessible to your reach. Ockam's Razor says the simplest explanation is usually the best. The problem could be a component failure, but is more likely to be something simple, like worn insulation. This is a tedious process, but it may eliminate a possible cause, which advances the inquiry.

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  • Phil B commented on woodbywright's instructable Wooden Try Square23 days ago
    Wooden Try Square

    Here is a photo that includes the smaller of my two aluminum and walnut squares. It is from a step in an Instructsble on an angle divider for really good miters from a couple of years ago.

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  • Phil B commented on woodbywright's instructable Wooden Try Square24 days ago
    Wooden Try Square

    Very nice. I visited San Juan Capistrano about five years ago. Some of the original tools used to build the various buildings are on display, and one of those is a wooden square very similar to yours. I tried to make a couple of similar squares from aluminum bar for the blade and walnut for the handles. They look very nice, and I wanted to make some for gifts. I used epoxy to glue the aluminum blade into the wooden handle. To my surprise, the epoxy contracted when it hardened and I had use a file by hand to make the top and bottom edges of the aluminum square again.

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  • Phil B's instructable Metal Cutting Bandsaw's weekly stats: 25 days ago
    • Metal Cutting Bandsaw
      1,414 views
      26 favorites
      13 comments
  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Metal Cutting Bandsaw26 days ago
    Metal Cutting Bandsaw

    Thank you. When I try to open your video file I get an error message. Could you post a still photo or two?

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Metal Cutting Bandsaw26 days ago
    Metal Cutting Bandsaw

    Thank you for your comment. At first tI had some trouble with accuracy when cutting with the very similar one of these I made for my son-in-law. I began to feel I could do as well with a hacksaw by hand. But, after extending the cut line and marking in on the table, i am much more accurate now. Still, good lighting and watching from a reasonably close distance also help a lot. People make these with all sorts of variations, according to what they have for tools and methods. I have found one of these works quite well, even if something is not quite as solid or accurate as you hoped. And, the blade travels so slowly that many anticipated problems just do not happen. One guy hung his on a wooden fixture attached to a stud in his workshop wall. The two man variations appear to be whether th...

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    Thank you for your comment. At first tI had some trouble with accuracy when cutting with the very similar one of these I made for my son-in-law. I began to feel I could do as well with a hacksaw by hand. But, after extending the cut line and marking in on the table, i am much more accurate now. Still, good lighting and watching from a reasonably close distance also help a lot. People make these with all sorts of variations, according to what they have for tools and methods. I have found one of these works quite well, even if something is not quite as solid or accurate as you hoped. And, the blade travels so slowly that many anticipated problems just do not happen. One guy hung his on a wooden fixture attached to a stud in his workshop wall. The two man variations appear to be whether the saw table attaches to the saw or to supports from the base of the stand. I wish you well with yours. Post some photos when you are finished.

    There are dozens of videos on saw stands people have made. No one clamps them in. They are very solid and stable without clamping. This Milwaukee has a very similar speed adjustment. Top speed is very slow.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Metal Cutting Bandsaw4 weeks ago
    Metal Cutting Bandsaw

    i do not believe I implied I made a bandsaw, although I did do that once about 40 years ago. It was for cutting wood and worked reasonably well.

    There are some videos at YouTube that show these saws cutting some heavy steel, like a rail iron. I have cut up to 3/8" steel with the identical setup I made for my son-in-law with another saw. It was faster than by hand. I am using a 24 teeth per inch blade on this one because I like the smoother cut, but I think a finer blade cuts more slowly. My son-in-law's blade was probably about 15 teeth per inch.Too much blade speed does destroy a good steel cutting bandsaw blade quickly. Working up a set of speed reduction pulleys for your wood bandsaw would be a lot of expense and bother. For about $20 US you can buy an electronic motor speed reducer that handles up to 15 Amperes of load current. Just plug it in and you are ready to go. It uses a solid state Triac to switch the motor on a...

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    There are some videos at YouTube that show these saws cutting some heavy steel, like a rail iron. I have cut up to 3/8" steel with the identical setup I made for my son-in-law with another saw. It was faster than by hand. I am using a 24 teeth per inch blade on this one because I like the smoother cut, but I think a finer blade cuts more slowly. My son-in-law's blade was probably about 15 teeth per inch.Too much blade speed does destroy a good steel cutting bandsaw blade quickly. Working up a set of speed reduction pulleys for your wood bandsaw would be a lot of expense and bother. For about $20 US you can buy an electronic motor speed reducer that handles up to 15 Amperes of load current. Just plug it in and you are ready to go. It uses a solid state Triac to switch the motor on and off many times a second, just like the control on a variable speed drill.Thank for looking and for commenting.

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  • Three-Way and Four-Way Switches--How They Work

    Welcome to Instructsbles! I hope you enjoy the site. My father tried to explain 4-way switches, but I did not get it. Finally, it clicked for me. I hope the day comes when you can use this to make one of these circuits work after it had not worked. People will think you are amazing. Thank you for looking.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Jerusalem Cross of Welded Concrete Nails7 weeks ago
    Jerusalem Cross of Welded Concrete Nails

    I like it very much. Thank you for posting a photo of it. I feel thankful and orivileged to have a welder. I went many years without one. If the opportunity ever comes to you, you will not regret having a welder.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Make an Electric Motor Run Again2 months ago
    Make an Electric Motor Run Again

    You could find there are several wires coming out of the motor and they are all sorts of colors other than black and white. Put a little black tape on all wires connecting to the black wire from the cord just to mark them. Connect all wires from the black wire to one screw on the switch. Connect the black wire to the other screw. Leave all wires connected to the white wire as they are.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Slime Your Presta Valve Bicycle Tubes2 months ago
    Slime Your Presta Valve Bicycle Tubes

    Actually, I found this idea in some litersture from Slime.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Make an Electric Motor Run Again2 months ago
    Make an Electric Motor Run Again

    You should be able to get a single pole on/off switch at a hardware store or a home improvement store. If you are in the USA get a switch that can handle 125 volts or more. Many other countries use 230 or 240 volts as the standard. Some 12 volt automotive switches look the same, but do not offer the same protections. You switch also needs to accomodate more than the Amperage draw of the motor. If the motor draws 12 Amps., a 15 Amp. switch is probably adequate, but 20 Amps. would be better. Wiring the switch is easy enough. Connect the white wires to each other. Connect one black wire to one of the screws on the switch and the other black wire to the other screw.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Rebuilding a Hydraulic Floor Jack2 months ago
    Rebuilding a Hydraulic Floor Jack

    bronco_5, I understand your distress about links that go dead. When that happens to me, I know two things, both useful. One, something helpful once existed at that link and may still exist at a new link. Two, there are enough clues in information about the link that I have a good head start in finding it on my own. When you publish your first Instructable, you will find ways to handle these things are not as simple as they appear to you now.

    The "C" ring rests in a groove around the inside of the cylinder, no doubt. Does it have ends cut at an angle? Can you gently pry under one of those ends and slide some sheet metal under the end until you raise enough of the "C" ring that you can get it out? Hopefully the surface of the cylinder is harder than the "C" ring and will not be damaged.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Airline Travel Tips2 months ago
    Airline Travel Tips

    Thank you for the link. My life has changd in the last 8 years and I no longer need to travel as much. Now I also have a Kindle e-reader and can carry a whole library on one thin device, so there is less reason to be bored. And, airlines often have on-board WiFi I can access free to see a map that shows where the plane is. We went to Europe in 2000. I read a tell-all book about secret thngs relsted to overseas jet travel and how to cope with them. I asked a friend, a former airline pilot, about one of the things and he said it was not really that way. That is about the extent of what I have read sbout travel tips.

    Thank you

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Curing 2-cycle Engine Problems2 months ago
    Curing 2-cycle Engine Problems

    I am not a small engine mechanic. In this Instructsble I simoly offered some thngs I found that are not always discussed in troubleshooting charts and their cure. Here is a link to a troubleshooting chart for 2-cycle engines. http://www.smallengineadvisor.com/members/2stroke/...It is not always a fast prccess, but explore possible solutions to problem descriptions that most closely describe your symptoms. Be sure you are using new clean fuel properly mixed for your engine.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Curing 2-cycle Engine Problems2 months ago
    Curing 2-cycle Engine Problems

    I would not be surprised if you have an air leak in one of the gaskets due to a loose screw. Have you worked through the things in this Instructable?

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  • Phil B's instructable Deep Throat Hacksaw's weekly stats: 2 months ago
    • Deep Throat Hacksaw
      484 views
      5 favorites
      4 comments
  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Reconstructive Surgery for a Suitcase2 months ago
    Reconstructive Surgery for a Suitcase

    It appears from the photos that you are able to remove the tube from the suitcase. I was concerned the problem would be somewhere inaccessible. 1) Could you simply replace the tube with a new piece of square tubing? 2) Could you drive a square piece of steel into the tube to push the dent back out? [This would be risky because the square steel would likely become lodged in the tube you are trying to fix, and you would need to be able to drive it out with another rod from the other end.] 3) Perhaps you could use a Dremel tool and a cutting wheel to remove the indentation. Then just leave an opening where the dent was, or have someone weld a patch in place with a MIG welder. Those are my ideas.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Deep Throat Hacksaw2 months ago
    Deep Throat Hacksaw

    Thank you very kindly. A MIG welder is a big help, as opposed to stick or flux core wire. Still, there are opportunities for numerous mistskes. Someone said we never become weldors, but we are always becoming weldors.

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  • Phil B commented on chienline's instructable How to Win Prizes at Instructables2 months ago
    How to Win Prizes at Instructables

    Encouraging disappointed authors is a very good thing. A nice aspect of Instructsbles in general is their "be nice policy." We have likely all had someone criticize one of our Instructables in very unfair and cruel ways. I have found those people usually have never submitted an Instructable themselves. I once posted about an idea that worked very well for me. When this guy tore my idea apart, I said I hoped he would publish his first Instructsble soon so we could comment on his work. Anyway, I just wanted to share my experience as someone who had decided never to enter snother contest, who did finally enter some other contests and won a couple of prizes, and who has also been asked a couple of times to participate in the judging.

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  • Phil B commented on chienline's instructable How to Win Prizes at Instructables2 months ago
    How to Win Prizes at Instructables

    I submitted a comment to the Instructsble by Mrballeng that you linked. I have won prizes in a contest a couple of times. I have also been a judge in a couple of other contests. From my experience as a judge, a winner first has to gather favorable response from ordinary site users to make the cut for those considered by judges. I took that responsibility very seriously and looked for entries that were good practical clever ideas presented well. If they would save the maker money, that was a bonus in my mind. I took my time judging and looked at my choices again several times before submitting them. Usually my choices were very close to those of other judges unknown to me. Then our reduced field went to folks at Instructables for final mudging and I have no idea how that worked. The time...

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    I submitted a comment to the Instructsble by Mrballeng that you linked. I have won prizes in a contest a couple of times. I have also been a judge in a couple of other contests. From my experience as a judge, a winner first has to gather favorable response from ordinary site users to make the cut for those considered by judges. I took that responsibility very seriously and looked for entries that were good practical clever ideas presented well. If they would save the maker money, that was a bonus in my mind. I took my time judging and looked at my choices again several times before submitting them. Usually my choices were very close to those of other judges unknown to me. Then our reduced field went to folks at Instructables for final mudging and I have no idea how that worked. The times when I did win something, it was part a good idea that appealed to quite a few others and I was making the submission at the right time. No real strategy beyond a good idea done well at the right time would have helped me.

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  • Phil B commented on Mrballeng's instructable How to Win Instructables Contests.2 months ago
    How to Win Instructables Contests.

    I have entered a few more contests than prizes I have won. At one point I resolved never again to enter another contest. I have also been a judge in a couple of contests. My task and that of other judges was to narrow the field for final judging by site members. I took that task very seriously and looked at my choices several times before submitting them. Most of my choices, but not all, agreed with the choices of the other judges. Still, the final results rested with users who responded in the open voting. As concerns judging, I looked for good clever practical ideas presented well. If the Instructsble would save someone who made it some money, that was a bonus in its favor. I did not favor something novel just because it was novel. When I rebelled against ever entering another contest...

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    I have entered a few more contests than prizes I have won. At one point I resolved never again to enter another contest. I have also been a judge in a couple of contests. My task and that of other judges was to narrow the field for final judging by site members. I took that task very seriously and looked at my choices several times before submitting them. Most of my choices, but not all, agreed with the choices of the other judges. Still, the final results rested with users who responded in the open voting. As concerns judging, I looked for good clever practical ideas presented well. If the Instructsble would save someone who made it some money, that was a bonus in its favor. I did not favor something novel just because it was novel. When I rebelled against ever entering another contest, I was turned off by how some high quality efforts got little favor in the results, but something that looked "cool" won a nice prize, even though there was very little real substance in it. (That actually haopened.)I wish I could say I carefully planned entering Instructables that won prizes for specific contests. I did not. In one case I won a MIG welder on an Instructsble I almost did not submit. That was because I had earlier worked very hard on a somewhat similar Instructable that got only a few views and very little response even though it was not for a contest or entered in a contest. But, I had taken photos in case I did write and submit an Instructsble. I confess I decided to give it a try when I saw the prizes offered. The rest was a happy accident. I did nothing to promote votes for my Instructsble, but let it rest on its own merits. When it became apparent I was one of the finalists and would win something, I told myself repeatedly that it would be one on the lowest tier of prizes. When I did win one of the top three prizes, i quickly sent a thank you e-mail to the sponsor and got a nice note of appreciation in return. Sayng "thank you" to someone who provides a nice prize is always good. If I were to develop a strategy for winning, I would have some photos in my files ready for submitting an Instructable. I would wait until a contest came along that I thought my idea could compete in. Then I would write up and submit my Instructable to be within the time frame required by the rules. As it is, several times i have seen a contest that fits something I have already done, but the time frame is way off and I cannot submit that Instructable in the current contest.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Deep Throat Hacksaw2 months ago
    Deep Throat Hacksaw

    Thank you you for looking and for commenting. You could use a variety of materials and tools for this, depending on what you have avaioable to yourself. I simoly wanted to see what I could do with thinwall electrical conduit.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Fix a Frozen Concoction Machine3 months ago
    Fix a Frozen Concoction Machine

    Thank you for looking at this. This drive coupling for the blender on these machines is certainly a weak link. Unfortunately, Sunbeam does not make any of the blender drive parts available to the public. The high torque demands on the blender drive make it difficult to find a home fix that will last. You can try building up what is lost with a resin. JB Weld might be a good material to use. You can get it at any hardware store. Getting just the right shape on the teeth might be much easier if you can set the blender down onto the drive while the JB Weld is still very soft. But, you would also want to use a release agent, perhaps a thin application of Vaseline, on the teeth in the blender so the blender is not permanently cemented to the base. I really wish there were an easy way to repl...

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    Thank you for looking at this. This drive coupling for the blender on these machines is certainly a weak link. Unfortunately, Sunbeam does not make any of the blender drive parts available to the public. The high torque demands on the blender drive make it difficult to find a home fix that will last. You can try building up what is lost with a resin. JB Weld might be a good material to use. You can get it at any hardware store. Getting just the right shape on the teeth might be much easier if you can set the blender down onto the drive while the JB Weld is still very soft. But, you would also want to use a release agent, perhaps a thin application of Vaseline, on the teeth in the blender so the blender is not permanently cemented to the base. I really wish there were an easy way to replace the plastic teeth on the drive with something made from metal, but i do not yet have any good ideas on how to do it.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Curing 2-cycle Engine Problems3 months ago
    Curing 2-cycle Engine Problems

    Does your carburetor have a float, or is it pulse carburetor using a diaphragm? If it uses a float, the float could have absorbed enough gasoline over the years that it has become hesvy. When the engine warms up the fuel becomes hotter and less buoyant. The float does not shut off the flow of gasoline when it should snd too much enters the engine, causing the engine to stumble. Also check to see if debris is blocking the air flow through the cowling and cooling fins. If these things are not your problem, do an Internet search for hot run problems in a 2-cycle engine.

    The answer to your problem is in the Introduction above. You have an air leak, probably from a poirly seated gasket. Choking the engine reduces the amount of air entering through the carburetor so the mixture is more nearly what it should be due to extra air entering through leaks. Tighten carburetor mounting screws and crankcase screws. Replace gaskets if tightening screws does not solve the problem.

    i do not inow. Check YouTube for a video on it.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Steel Belt Clip for an Otterbox Case3 months ago
    Steel Belt Clip for an Otterbox Case

    Let's talk with private messages. I am out of town for a week.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable The Radial Arm Saw -- a Guide of Sorts3 months ago
    The Radial Arm Saw -- a Guide of Sorts

    This is my second response. There may also be a red reset button. If the motor overheats, the reset trips the circuit to protect the motor. Pressing the button closes the circuit again.

    First, the colored buttons were a sales gimmic by Sears/Craftsman to make the saw seem easier to use because a colored scale on part of the saw matches and is controlled by a button or lever with the same color on it. Other manufacturers, even earlier versions of the same saw may not have colors.The arbor is the shaft in the motor. What appears as a red button on the end of the motor arbor opposite the blade end is probably not a control button, but a thread protector. It screws off to reveal a threaded end of the shaft useful for attaching a 1/2" drill chuck or a sanding drum.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Erratic Instrument Panel on GM Cars4 months ago
    Erratic Instrument Panel on GM Cars

    Soon after this Instructsble I found the ignition switch was also my real problem, and I did another Instructsble on changing that fairly easily. I removed the instrument cluster and pulled the ignition switch out through the opening left by the instrument cluster. I did need to heat and bend one end of a boxed wrench to access two mounting bolts behind the finished dashboard.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Fountain Pen Problems4 months ago
    Fountain Pen Problems

    Thank you, Amy. If your pen has an ink reservoir, its delivery system would be very similar to that found in a fountain pen. I am glad to have been helpful.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable The Radial Arm Saw -- a Guide of Sorts4 months ago
    The Radial Arm Saw -- a Guide of Sorts

    I am assuming radial arm saws are not often seen currently where you live. They have become less popular and less available in recent years. In some parts of the world they may never have been available and many have never seen one. A radial arm saw allows you to cut wood to length with 90 degree cuts. This is done by pulling the motor carriage (on rollers) toward the operator with a stiff arm and shoulder to keep the blade from grabbing and propelling itself toward the operator. (If the saw is properly aligned, it does not bind, and this is not a problem.) The blade may be tilted to cut with a bevel cut. A knob and a locking pin near the handle on the motor carriage are used to change the tilt of the blade. Another knob cranks an elevation screw that raises the motor or lowers the moto...

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    I am assuming radial arm saws are not often seen currently where you live. They have become less popular and less available in recent years. In some parts of the world they may never have been available and many have never seen one. A radial arm saw allows you to cut wood to length with 90 degree cuts. This is done by pulling the motor carriage (on rollers) toward the operator with a stiff arm and shoulder to keep the blade from grabbing and propelling itself toward the operator. (If the saw is properly aligned, it does not bind, and this is not a problem.) The blade may be tilted to cut with a bevel cut. A knob and a locking pin near the handle on the motor carriage are used to change the tilt of the blade. Another knob cranks an elevation screw that raises the motor or lowers the motor by raising or lowering the arm on which the motor carriage is mounted. That means your cuts can form a dado groove rather than a complete separation cut. The motor carriage has a locking lever and an indexing pin that can be used to swivel the motor 90 degrees to the left or to the right. This is for making rip cuts. A fence on the saw table guides the wood. There are two swivel positions: an inrip and an outrip position. These are necessary so any width can be ripped. Two positions are necessary because the blade is offset from the swivel axis. (Cross cutting keeps the wood stationary while the saw motor moves. Rip cutting keeps the motor in a stationary position while the wood is fed from one side of the saw table to the other, much like ripping with a table saw. The arm may be cranked up to make a dado cut rather than a separation cut. The blade may also be tilted to make a beveled rip cut. And, a knob on the arm can be loosened so the arm can swing 45 degrees to the right or the left for making miter cuts. An index pin on the arm helps lock the arm position at 45 degrees left, 90 degrees, and at 45 degrees right.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Rebuilding a Hydraulic Floor Jack4 months ago
    Rebuilding a Hydraulic Floor Jack

    We moved to another state and my brother-in-law now has the jack. All I can advise is to contact Blackhawk. I do remember they had quite a number of repair kits and I puzzled over a chart a good long while before I ordered. I may have contacted them before I ordered. I wish I could be more help.

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  • Phil B commented on GarageBot's instructable Cheap Simple Welding Cart5 months ago
    Cheap Simple Welding Cart

    It is really difficult to see well when welding flux core wire. A fan to blow away the smoke while welding is very helpful. Marking the weld bead path with chalk sometimes helps. So does extra light. A very easy thing that helps is to tack at both ends and then weld a short segment of a quarter inch or so toward the tack, After a short segment weld to the start of the last short segment. Enough light reflects from the end of each short segment to keep you bead on track. (Clean away slap between short segments to avoid slag inclusions.)

    If you look at my various Instructsbles, you will see some really bad welding, but it holds together to do what it needs to do. What I wrote are some things I wish I had learned earlier. I have a gas shielded MIG now and it is easier to use than the flux core welder, but flux core does a good job and has some benefits when needed. I saw something that said no one is a welder, but we are all learning to be a welder. By the way, many people with your machine add a ten dollar bridge rectifier to it because your machine is AC output, but flux core works better with DC. There are videos about the conversion at YouTube. Amazon sells the bridge rectifier. Thank you for your Instructable. Good job!

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Keep Your Breath Warm in Cold Weather5 months ago
    Keep Your Breath Warm in Cold Weather

    Thank you for looking and commenting. These work amazingly well after a few minutes of warmup. I wish 3M had continues to make and sell them.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Auto Battery Charger for 6 or 12 Volt Sytems5 months ago
    Auto Battery Charger for 6 or 12 Volt Sytems

    You made me learn something. I found this page about charging AGM batteries by Optima. Low and slow is best, but they mention 1 to 10 amp. chargers as acceptable. Simple circuits for a current limiter using a regulator chip and a very few resistors and capacitors, maybe a diode or two can be used to make your own limiter. You could also contact the maker of your battery to see what they say. https://www.optimabatteries.com/en-us/support/charging/charging-agm-battery

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Slime Your Presta Valve Bicycle Tubes5 months ago
    Slime Your Presta Valve Bicycle Tubes

    Thank you for looking and for commenting. I have never had an impact flat like you describe. Slime is effective with pinhole leaks. Do potholes cause the tube to tear? Slime would not be effective on a tear. Once I knew how long Slime is supposed to hold up. I am guessing it would still work until one year. I usually had a failure of some kind that required replacing the tube within a year or two, anyway.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Child's Wooden Coin-Operated Gumball Machine5 months ago
    Child's Wooden Coin-Operated Gumball Machine

    Caleb,Thank you for your note and for your pictures. I am able to follow the path the coin follows, and you have been very clever with the top of the coin pushing the hinged plate. I am not sure I understand the pathway the candy takes. The only suggestion I can make is to build a prototype from expendable materials so you can work out any unexpected problems. Then make your final version using what you have learned. Very good job!

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  • Phil B commented on tomatoskins's instructable Table Saw Disc Sander5 months ago
    Table Saw Disc Sander

    Sears sold these for table saws back around 1970. But, theirs had a very helpful variation. The disc was not flat, but was a slight cone that angled from the center out at 2 degrees. That eliminated circular scoring marks and made it possible to use the disc for joining boards as if they had been prepared on a planer. Naturally, the tilt on the table saw had to be set to 2 degrees.

    Sears sold these for table saws back around 1970. But, theirs had a very helpful variation. The disc was not flat, but was a slight one that angled from the center out at 2 degrees. That eliminated circular scoring marks and made it possible to use the disc for joining boards as if they had been prepared on a planer. Naturally, the tilt on the table saw had to be set to 2 degrees.

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  • Phil B commented on bricobart's instructable 18th Century Style Custom Pistol (nerf)5 months ago
    18th Century Style Custom Pistol (nerf)

    What you copied from the ATF says a non-licensed gun maker must pay a tax and get advance approval from the ATF before making a gun. Why do you say I am wrong for saying you must get approval before making a gun? I appreciate that you found and copied the official document. I paraphrased someone's description of the regulations.

    Who is wrong about what? I think what I wrote says the same things as what you wrote. ("Advanced approval" is no different from what I meant by "permission.") It is good you quoted the actual regulations. I paraphrased someone's summary of them.

    I was careful to state what I found is in regard to United States regulations. I know many at Instructables reside across the entire world. I also know that gun laws are much more restrictive in many other countries than they are in the United States.

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  • Phil B commented on bricobart's instructable 18th Century Style Custom Pistol (nerf)5 months ago
    18th Century Style Custom Pistol (nerf)

    The U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms does allow non-licensed individuals to build firearms. According to regulations, the maker must not be legally prohibited from owning a firearm and any gun he makes cannot be sold to another. Certain guns, like machine guns are forbidden. Application must be made to the ATF for permission to make a gun, and a tax must be paid. Check the ATF web page.

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  • Phil B's instructable Better Sound From Echo Dot's weekly stats: 5 months ago
    • Better Sound From Echo Dot
      1,239 views
      14 favorites
      8 comments
  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Support Bench Tools on a Workmate5 months ago
    Support Bench Tools on a Workmate

    I looked closely at mine. Can you still grasp enough to release the Workmate so it collapses? My thoughts were that you might be able to make new release levers, or add back what is broken using pop rivets to attach the replacement portions, or have someone weld replacement extended tabs to the part.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable What Bible Should I Buy?5 months ago
    What Bible Should I Buy?

    There are many good English versions. Go to biblegateway (dot) com and test as many versions as you would like. The Holman Christian Standard Bible (HCSB) is very good. If you do not find it, there is a slightly revised newer edition called the Christian Standard Bible (CSB) and you may find that in place of the HCSB. Once you have decided on a version you like, you may be able to download it to a device you use, or you can buy a printed paper version. A download may even be free.I would encourage you to begin with the Gospel of John from the New Testament. Someone once said it is like a pond in which a beginner can swim without drowning, and yet the most learned theologian will never touch bottom.Thank you for your inquiry. I wish you well.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Slime Your Presta Valve Bicycle Tubes5 months ago
    Slime Your Presta Valve Bicycle Tubes

    I did not mention that because I have never seen them, but, I also have not bought any Presta tubes since about 2010.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Better Sound From Echo Dot5 months ago
    Better Sound From Echo Dot

    I have been in that situation. If you were able to use a cardboard mailing tube of an acceptable size, a knife might be the only tool you need, even if from a kitchen drawer. I did use this today since my earlier reply to you. I was listening to a talk radio program. Even with voice there are definite improvements in sound quality and volume.

    My cash outlay was less than $6 U.S. You can make this in an hour or less. I already had a 7/8 inch countersink bit. But, you could also make sound ports by cutting inverted "U"-shaped openings from the bottom. Leave three legs so it is stable on any surface. I believe it is very much worth the cost and effort, if you play music through your Dot. I confess. I listen to talk broadcasts from radio stations located elsewhere.

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  • Phil B commented on Jule's instructable Wire Clamp Making Tool6 months ago
    Wire Clamp Making Tool

    I made one of these a few months ago, but have not used it yet. I used 1/2 inch square tubing and a 5/16 inch toilet tank bolt. I put a hex nut on the bolt and will use a wrench to tighten the bolt. People at Instructsbles are just grateful to anyone who publishes a submission. The on,y ones who have been unkind in their comments to me are people who have never published an Instructable themselves, but they know what is wrong with our work. You are doing fine.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Fountain Pen Problems6 months ago
    Fountain Pen Problems

    A very Merry Christmas to you, too!

    Thank you for looking. I am glad your pen is working well again. By the way, I went against warnings and mixed two different brands of ink. Gelatainous strands began to form in the ink after a while. Those do not flow through a nib at all.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Extend the Life of a Washing Machine Timer6 months ago
    Extend the Life of a Washing Machine Timer

    I am having difficulty visualizing your problem. Could you include a photo or two? Even then, I have not looked at one of these in a while. I am not sure how much help I can be. Thanks.

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  • Phil B's instructable Picture or Shelf Hanging Fixture's weekly stats: 6 months ago
    • Picture or Shelf Hanging Fixture
      114 views
      2 favorites
      4 comments
  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Curing 2-cycle Engine Problems6 months ago
    Curing 2-cycle Engine Problems

    Did you check through the engine for problems I mentioned, like air leaks? It sounds like the engine is not getting the right fuel at the right mixture in the right amount. Several things could cause that. Those include air not getting back into the gas tank through the vent in the cap, an obstructed fuel filter, a sticking float (although you likely have a pulsed carburetor with no float), proper mixture screw settings, and no air leaks at the carburetor and engine gaskets.

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  • Phil B commented on lucasstrigel's instructable Raspberry Pi Amazon Echo6 months ago
    Raspberry Pi Amazon Echo

    A note on the manufacturer's web page says their WiFi software is not yet perfected and they ask that a dongle be used until that is worked out.

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  • Phil B's entry Make an Electric Motor Run Again is a winner in the Make It Move Contest 2017 contest 6 months ago
  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Sharpen Your Drill Bits6 months ago
    Sharpen Your Drill Bits

    Thank you for the update.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Picture or Shelf Hanging Fixture6 months ago
    Picture or Shelf Hanging Fixture

    Thank you. I made something from real cherry once, and I was surprised that it did not take a dark color unless I stained it dark.

    Thank you. Mounting plates for some devices also sometimes come with a paper patter like that, but it is handy and clever to make your own when needed. A copier has always been a machine someone else has that is not really accessible to me for such needs.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Sharpen Your Drill Bits7 months ago
    Sharpen Your Drill Bits

    Most probably the angle on your bits is 59 degrees. That is pretty standard unless you have a very specialized bit. Although it is not generally recommended practice, you can sharpen bits on the side of the grinding wheel rather than on the circumference of the wheel. Can you temporarily mount your bench grinder on a riser of some kind?

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  • Phil B's entry Make an Electric Motor Run Again is a finalist in the Make It Move Contest 2017 contest 7 months ago
  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Sharpen Your Drill Bits7 months ago
    Sharpen Your Drill Bits

    Welcome to Instructsbles. I learned some minor things from my own use, particularly what is in step 11. Check the results you are getting as you go and make minor adjustments. Unfortunately, it is easy to grind away part of the tip against which the flute rests. I began with the directions included with the device and made common sense tweaks. From my side, the purpose of this Instructable was to record those so I did not need to reinvent the wheel after a long period of no use. Since posting this, I finally learned to sharpen drills by hand. It is not nearly as difficult as I thought. A couple of videos at YouTube were very helpful.

    Amazon does have it as a General 825 drill sharpener. Search for that. It is about $25 plus shipping, etc.

    Mine has a Sears Craftsman label on it and I bought it back in the 1970s, but it is actually made by General. I searched for General drill sharpener guide and found a listing at Zoro (dot) com for about $28 plus whatever for shipping and handling. You could probably also search eBay. Amazon did have them a couple of years ago. Lately, I have been sharpening drills by hand. It is much easier than I thought it would be. There are some helpful videos at YouTube.

    Mine has a Sears Craftsman label on it and I bought it back in the 1970s, but it is actually made by General. I searched for General drill sharpener guide and found a listing at Zoro (dot) com for about $28 plus whatever for shipping and handling. You could probably also search eBay. Amazon did have them a couple of years ago. Lately, I have been sharpening drills by hand. It is much easier than I thought it would be. There are some helpful videos at YouTube.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable An Improvement to a Dremel Tool7 months ago
    An Improvement to a Dremel Tool

    Thank you for the idea.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Easy CD Tower7 months ago
    Easy CD Tower

    Thanks. The CDs are easy to grab and remove from the tower. Putting the CDs back into the tower requires a little more care, but it is not a problem. Once you get set up for the dado cuts, it is very easy to construct.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Garage Door Does Not Close7 months ago
    Garage Door Does Not Close

    Thank you for looking. Actually I have a very selfish motive. The next time I have a problem I can refer to my Instructable without doing all of the research again. It is also fun to benefit others now and then.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Support Bench Tools on a Workmate7 months ago
    Support Bench Tools on a Workmate

    Congratulations on your bargain purchase. They are very handy and versatile. Let your imagination flow, but also be safe.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable No Wiggle Handle7 months ago
    No Wiggle Handle

    Thank you. I trust your screw did the job.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Never Again Weld a Crooked Bead7 months ago
    Never Again Weld a Crooked Bead

    Thank you. It can be very difficult to see when using flux core wire. Now I have a gas shielded welder, and it is much easier to see where the weld seam will be. With thinner materials, especially, it works well to tack both ends of the weld. Then weld back to the tack a distance of about 3/8". Then weld back to that weld about the same distance. Repeat until the bead is complete. It is easier to see and the joint is not as likely to heat up and expand.

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