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Like most wood shops that have an open area under the workbench, it soon accumulates all of the left over and scrap wood underneath. When I dug all of mine out to clean the floor, I decided to come up with a better way. I thought about more shelves, but that still leaves room on the floor. Then I thought drawers, big drawers, but the size and strength of the rails would be daunting and expensive. I kept the drawer idea somewhat, but moved the "rails" to the floor in the form of swivel casters. This has the added benefit of being completely unattached, and moveable anywhere.

I first added guide rails to the legs of my workbench, flush with the sides of the legs. They look like shelf supports, but are only meant to guide the drawers since I used all swivel casters. With all swivel casters the drawers will self align once you get it started.

In the case of my shop, each of the spaces between the legs was a little different so each drawer assembly measured accordingly. I left 1/4" clearance on each side, but made all of the drawers the same depth and height. I left several inches between the top of the drawer and the shelf above it so I could drop pieces in without pulling the drawer out.

Next I considered how strong the drawer needed to be and what construction method to use. I decided that 1/2" 3 ply(cheap) plywood, and gluing and nailing all seams was the simplest, and sufficiently rugged for the purpose. I used 1" 18ga nails with an air nailgun.

I added a 4" piece of ply under each set of casters, both for added strength, and so I could use decent size screws for the casters without going through the bottom. Since the material was all 1/2 ply, I could only nail the 4" pieces on the short ends, so those were glued to the drawer bottom also.

A pair of drawer pulls fastened with 1/2" screws completed the drawer.

Hopefully this will keep the scrap material a little more organized, and I have enough drawers to separate plywood, 2", 1", and fireplace kindling into different bins. I even used some of my "scrap" for this project!

<p>You definitely need to re-read the second sentence of this instructable, there is an extra letter in one of the words!</p>
<p>Muy bueno su trabajo. Le dejo la sugerencia de hacer los cajones mas chicos, para dejar espacio para sus pies.</p>
<p>man, I WISH I had that much shop space. </p><p>We can always dream. </p>
<p>Excellent solution! </p><p>Now all I need is half an acre of workshop like you have so that I can justify building all those drawers!</p>
Consider using expanded steel mesh for the base. It allows saw dust to fall through and not fill up your drawers.
<p>That is a great idea. I had exactly the same problem, except that my free-standing workshop was full. a high work bench on the left side, and my copy of a German 1889 workbench on the right. All other space was taken up with table saws and a mirad of machines. My solutioon was to build an 8 x 10 lean-to shed outside for my scraps. I don't throw anything away. It all goes into more projects.</p>
<p>Great idea....I was just wrestling with this same issue yesterday and came up with a similar solution but likes your better. You caught me just in time before I headed out to Home Depot! :)</p><p>I noticed your mitre saw set up...very nice. Is that a standard shop vac permanently connected to your saw? How does taht work out for you?</p>
<p>It does not work as well as I had hoped, probably too small. If you look at my other instructable;</p><p><a href="https://www.instructables.com/id/DIY-Shop-Vac-Dust-Collector/" rel="nofollow">https://www.instructables.com/id/DIY-Shop-Vac-Dust-Collector/</a></p><p>I need to tie my mitre saw into it but it is on the other side of the shop and on a different circuit. I may try a bigger vac first. The mitre saw generates too much air flow on its own for the little $19 vac I used. The vac plugs into a sensing circuit that turns it on automatically.</p>
<p>I have a common problem in my shop, I went with full 4' x 8' drawers that I also use for power tool storage under my lower racks....</p>
<p>Love your workshop! My workshop cum laundry room looks like a bomb has gone off :-( . It got si bad that I'm finally getting around to making a table with all the scrap wood I have around...so it's NOT beautiful :-P. But I'm working on ideas to camouflage my workshop ;-)</p>
Awesome job. Your workshop is a dream come true.
<p>This is an excellent solution. I love the caster idea, and the multiple bins for organizing. </p><p>I currently have two huge scrap bins, but they're completely useless organization-wise. I keep scrap to use, but can never find the ideal piece for a job without digging through the whole pile! </p><p>If/when I reorganize my shop, this ideas will definitely be in the mix. Thanks!</p>
<p>Very nice storage! Scrap wood seems to multiply all on its own. This is a good solution - keeps it in sight but not unsightly. </p>

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