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331Instructables13,952,973Views4,860CommentsVancouver, Washington USA (not British Columbia, Canada--the other Vancouver)
I miss the days when magazines like Popular Mechanics had all sorts of DIY projects for making and repairing just about everything. I am enjoying posting things I have learned and done since I got my first tools. I enjoy studying the Bible and recently retired after 40 years as a Lutheran pastor. I like to dabble with some electronics projects. I have a lathe, a radial arm saw, a router, and both a 220 volt stick welder and a flux core wire feed welder. I appreciate Instructables from ... Read More »

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Curing 2-cycle engine problems17 hours ago
    Curing 2-cycle engine problems

    It sounds as if your engine is running as it should. You simply are not getting power through the drive train to the wheel. Is the centrifugal clutch engaging? Is there any kind of locking pin that has sheared? You will probably need to remove shields and follow the drive train to see what is not engaging and what you can do about it.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Make an Auto Radiator Pressure Tester1 week ago
    Make an Auto Radiator Pressure Tester

    I am not well qualified to know. Newer radiators are plastic, at least in part. My impression is that those are not repairable. Older copper radiators are repairable. As you likely know, there are products designed to stop the leak in much the same way that your blood clots when you have a cut. That works with a small leak not under too great a pressure.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Setting Up a Radial Arm Saw1 week ago
    Setting Up a Radial Arm Saw

    There is some play without the knob. I would not want to use the saw if the knob were missing. But, I am quite certain it is a standard bolt and thread size (assuming you live where English sizes rather than metric are the norm). I am away from my workshop for a few weeks and cannot check for you, but I am guessing it is 5/15", possibly 3/8". You should be able to find that knob on eBay. Or, a member of Instructsbles has quite a few parts for these saws. I could ask him if I might give you his name for contact.Another option is to put a knob end on a short bolt with wood or something else, or bend a bolt so it has an "L" shape for a handle.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Fountain Pen Problems1 week ago
    Fountain Pen Problems

    Scott,It sounds like a poor fit between the nib and the feed. See the text and photos of the Instructsble around step 7 on how you can use very hot water to soften and reset the feed in relation to the nib. Flushing the pen regularly as you do is a good idea.

    I am glad. Thank you for the report.

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  • Phil B commented on dovetailsanddadoes's instructable Saw Blade Cleaning1 week ago
    Saw Blade Cleaning

    More than 40 years ago Sears sold a solution for dissolving gums and varnishes on saw teeth. I asked at Lowe's about something and the older gentleman said his father always used turpentine. It works well.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Curing 2-cycle engine problems1 week ago
    Curing 2-cycle engine problems

    I had a similar accident with a small garden tiller. I went searching on the Internet. What I found suggested removing the spark plug and putting about a teaspoon of oil into the combustion chamber. Then put a socket wrench with a long bar on the flywheel nut. Turn the engine slowly in one direction only until it is free. Put the spark plug back in, put back any parts you removed, and try starting it. In my case, the engine started and ran fine. I am sure I did not do it any favors and caused some extra wear. We sold the house where we lived at the time and left that tiller with the new homeowner. I cannot say if it is still working, but expect it is.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable A New Paradigm Rack for Garden Tools1 week ago
    A New Paradigm Rack for Garden Tools

    Thanks. That should work.

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  • Phil B's instructable Angle Divider for Perfect Miters No 2's weekly stats: 2 weeks ago
    • Angle Divider for Perfect Miters No 2
      10,540 views
      129 favorites
      0 comments
  • Phil B's instructable Loss-Proof Comb's weekly stats: 2 weeks ago
    • Loss-Proof Comb
      580 views
      19 favorites
      2 comments
  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Fountain Pen Problems3 weeks ago
    Fountain Pen Problems

    First, I would flush the pen thoroughly in water at room temperature. It could soak. There may be ink dried in the passageways. Also check the nib to feed fit. Renew the fit as described in the Instructsble. Most pen problems come from a poor nib to feed fit.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Loss-Proof Comb3 weeks ago
    Loss-Proof Comb

    Thanks. I thought I had seen combs that food out of a case. Mine is working well and I have not lost it, yet.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Curing 2-cycle engine problems3 weeks ago
    Curing 2-cycle engine problems

    Here is a link to the problem you describe, but with 4-cycle engines. Still, some things would still be applicable. As it mentions, heat causes things to move. In the case of your 2-cycle engine, a mating surface may be opening and letting in too much air. Check all screws and crankcase bolts for tightness, assuming the gaskets are still good. Is the a good spark you can see when you turn the engine over during the time it will not start? Remove the plug wire and set up a small gap to a grounded wire, maybe with another spark plug. I seem to remember hot start problems can be caused by fuel percolation problems. Is there any reason why the fuel system would have overheated and caused a vapor lock? As the article notes, there could be several different causes. http://www.repairfaq.org/sa...see more »Here is a link to the problem you describe, but with 4-cycle engines. Still, some things would still be applicable. As it mentions, heat causes things to move. In the case of your 2-cycle engine, a mating surface may be opening and letting in too much air. Check all screws and crankcase bolts for tightness, assuming the gaskets are still good. Is the a good spark you can see when you turn the engine over during the time it will not start? Remove the plug wire and set up a small gap to a grounded wire, maybe with another spark plug. I seem to remember hot start problems can be caused by fuel percolation problems. Is there any reason why the fuel system would have overheated and caused a vapor lock? As the article notes, there could be several different causes. http://www.repairfaq.org/samnew/lmfaq/lmedwrwh.htm

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Curing 2-cycle engine problems3 weeks ago
    Curing 2-cycle engine problems

    I am not aware of your location. I spent eight years west of Cleveland, Ohio. We did not get the heavy lake effect snows they got on the east side, but it was still more than enough snow. I was the pastor of a church. The church owned a Gravely 4-cycle tractor with mower and a snow blower attachments. It was parked in a lean-to next to our garage. I did the responsible thing and made certain the engine oil and filter were fresh and the 2 volt battery was charged. I figured I needed to keep the "L"-shaped driveway around our house clear after a storm so I could get to the hospital or someone's house if there were ever an emergency and people wanted the pastor right now. We also had a preschool with a church parking lot that ran between two streets a block apart. The preschool n...see more »I am not aware of your location. I spent eight years west of Cleveland, Ohio. We did not get the heavy lake effect snows they got on the east side, but it was still more than enough snow. I was the pastor of a church. The church owned a Gravely 4-cycle tractor with mower and a snow blower attachments. It was parked in a lean-to next to our garage. I did the responsible thing and made certain the engine oil and filter were fresh and the 2 volt battery was charged. I figured I needed to keep the "L"-shaped driveway around our house clear after a storm so I could get to the hospital or someone's house if there were ever an emergency and people wanted the pastor right now. We also had a preschool with a church parking lot that ran between two streets a block apart. The preschool needed to have two wheel tracks across the parking lot cleared so parents could enter from one street, drop or pick up kids, and exit on the other street. After a snow, I was the one on the scene who, by default, made those things happen. I was glad to have such good equipment and did not mind the maintenance work to keep it ready too much. The clearing of the snow, especially ice crystals blowing back into my face did not thrill me.

    Thank you for the good report. I love success stories. It is a bit of a pain to run the engine at the end of the season until the gas is gone, even if you make your best effort to drain all you can from the tank first. It seems so wasteful, but it is worth it. I am glad you got it without too much difficulty. Now, for your sake, I hope you do not have a lot of snow and really do not need to use the blower!

    I do not work on engines regularly, and do not now own anything with a small engine on it. There was a time when I had to keep a couple of small engines running, If the carburetor sat for a couple of years with old fuel in it, chances are real good something is gummed up. Then there is also the total age of the machine to consider. A couple of people here had older machines. Ten years seems to be a tipping point. At that age, gaskets, and possibly also crankshaft seals no longer seal. Air leaks into the crankcase and makes the mixture far too lean for the engine to run. But, those usually do not start and run for a short period. They just do not start, except with starting fluid. Then they stumble and die.A lot depends on what type of carburetor your engine has. I know Briggs & Stra...see more »I do not work on engines regularly, and do not now own anything with a small engine on it. There was a time when I had to keep a couple of small engines running, If the carburetor sat for a couple of years with old fuel in it, chances are real good something is gummed up. Then there is also the total age of the machine to consider. A couple of people here had older machines. Ten years seems to be a tipping point. At that age, gaskets, and possibly also crankshaft seals no longer seal. Air leaks into the crankcase and makes the mixture far too lean for the engine to run. But, those usually do not start and run for a short period. They just do not start, except with starting fluid. Then they stumble and die.A lot depends on what type of carburetor your engine has. I know Briggs & Stratton used a pulse carburetor with a diaphragm, but that is usually on 3.5 HP engines and 4-cycle. In time the diaphragm is no longer taut enough to function and needs to be replaced. Some carburetors have a float. Those can be come "heavy" by a few grams and they do not shut the gas supply off when they should. But, you see moist gas on the spark plug or running out of the engine and the exhaust smells like fresh gas, if it runs at all.I mentioned fuel starvation. That can happen when the vent cap no longer lets air back into the gas tank because the little vent is plugged. But, the engine usually runs for a few minutes before stumbling and dying. You can test the engine by loosening the cap just a bit to see if it no longer stumbles. The air cleaner can be restricted. The fuel filter (if it has one, usually in-line between the tank and the carburetor) could be restricted. It is good maintenance to replace fuel filters periodically, anyway. Most small engine carburetors are fairly simple, but there can always be small passageways that are blocked with gums and varnishes from old gasoline. And, a main point in this Instructable is that (as above) gaskets are assumed to be tight and sealing, but a mounting screw even one-quarter of a turn loose lets in air that makes the mixture lean. Usually those keep the engine from starting at all, though. You could get some carburetor cleaner and spray into the engine. Let it soak. Then blow it out or chase it with starting fluid to clean it out. You will probably need to do this a few times to open up whatever is gummed up. As you likely know now, it is a good idea to run the last bit of gasoline out of the machine at the end of the season. I tried to do that with our mower, leaf blower, string trimmer, and garden tiller. When I did that I never had any trouble at the beginning of the next season. (We no longer have any of those machines.)If you cannot find the proper gaskets, you can often trace and cut your own from a gasket material you would get at an auto parts store. A mower repair shop can probably get the right gaskets for your if you need some.

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  • Phil B's instructable MIG Nozzle Cleaning Tool's weekly stats: 3 weeks ago
    • MIG Nozzle Cleaning Tool
      2,162 views
      20 favorites
      4 comments
  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Curing 2-cycle engine problems3 weeks ago
    Curing 2-cycle engine problems

    Is that a 2-cycle or a 4-cycle engine? If it runs a short time and then dies, that sounds like fuel starvation. You would need to look for anything that could restrict fuel flow or cause the mixture entering the combustion chamber to be too, too lean.

    I can only guess. Have you checked the spark plug for oil fouling? The exhaust ports from the cylinder head to the exhaust pipe and muffler could be partially occluded from carbon deposits, depending on how long it ran with too much 2-cycle oil in the fuel mixture.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Fountain Pen Problems3 weeks ago
    Fountain Pen Problems

    Do you know how it got to be too tight? Did it leak and ink dried in the threads, or did someone screw it on too tightly? If it were a nut and a bolt, you would heat the nut to make it expand on the bold and break free. You may be able to use hot water on the cap to do the same. If dried in in the threads is the problem, soaking the thread area in water may dissolve the dried ink. There is something called a fiberboard wrench. They are used with camera lens parts. They are like a band that fits snugly around the body of the lens section. When the handle is squeezed together the grip is hefty without applying too much pressure in any one place. You might be able to improvise such a wrench custom fitted to your pen and also another for the cap.

    I found the wrenches I mentioned, but they have a different name. http://stores.ebay.com/Micro-Tools/_i.html?_nkw=flexiclamp&submit=Search&_sid=3838713

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Twist Drill Sharpening Helper4 weeks ago
    Twist Drill Sharpening Helper

    Someone else suggested that. Yes, the space below the nuts is 120 degrees wide and that is very close to the 118 degrees suggested as the standard. But, how do you make certain the 120 degree angle is centered or equally divided on both sides of the drill's center line? The guide I detailed shows you each face is 59 degrees from the center line of the drill. Two nuts show you only that both faces are 120 degrees apart.

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  • Phil B's instructable Twist Drill Sharpening Helper's weekly stats: 4 weeks ago
    • Twist Drill Sharpening Helper
      35,682 views
      87 favorites
      24 comments
  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Twist Drill Sharpening Helper1 month ago
    Twist Drill Sharpening Helper

    My son-in-law has a smaller Drill Doctor. I used it successfully once, but got poor results another time. The very fine grit indicated to me it is a good machine for a light touch up, but very slow if substantial grinding is needed to restore the drill's profile.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Strange Toilet Leak1 month ago
    Strange Toilet Leak

    I did install one of those newer ballcock designs oin another toilet. I also wanted to explain that granular material mysteriously appearing on the bottom of the tank can get under the flapper to cause a strange leaking, and that granular material could be from rusting components a DIY person can replace with his own parts he made.

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  • Phil B's instructable Strange Toilet Leak's weekly stats: 1 month ago
    • Strange Toilet Leak
      441 views
      5 favorites
      5 comments
  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Improvise a Female USB Connector1 month ago
    Improvise a Female USB Connector

    Thank you. I once picked up a copy of the 13th edition of his "Upgrading and Repairing PCs" on a sale table after the 14th or 15th edition had been published and decided to read it cover-to-cover. I learned a lot of things, but did not understand everything. Later I bought a copy of his volume on repairing laptops and read it cover-to-cover, too. The 'genius' label might be appropriate if I had understood everything.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Re-Magnetize a Tool1 month ago
    Re-Magnetize a Tool

    Thank you for looking at this. Electromagnetism is one of a few ways to magnetize a tool. Others include storing a tool in line with the earth's magnetic lines of force between North and South Poles and storing a tool in a drawer next to a strong magnet. Yesterday I was in a restaurant. When I picked up my butter knife, the handle of the spoon came with it. The knife was magnetized, although not from the factory, I am sure.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable An Improvement to a Dremel Tool1 month ago
    An Improvement to a Dremel Tool

    Thank you. As you can see from some of the other comments, newer Dremels come with a screwdriver point on the little collet wrench. Mine was inherited from my father-in-law's estate and is older. It came without that little screwdriver tip. I am glad you can use the idea.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable My Table Saw from a Circular Saw Redone1 month ago
    My Table Saw from a Circular Saw Redone

    Thank you for looking and for your comment. Although you are joking with me, the photo shows another table saw I put together because I needed one in that place. I had no access to any saw other than the Skilsaw that would become the main component of this table saw. I used the long leg of a framing square as a guide for the saw. That meant a lot of careful measuring followed by clamping and cutting one cut at a time until slots for the miter gauge were uniform in width and exactly parallel to one another. It is possible to do this without any other saw to assist, but it means slow and careful work. I have found by experience photos larger than 100 to 150 kilobytes are often slow to display, so that is the file size I aim to use.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable MIG Nozzle Cleaning Tool1 month ago
    MIG Nozzle Cleaning Tool

    While I used hardened cut nails, I do not think hardened steel is necessary. Mild steel should be hard enough. The nozzle appears to be copper, which would be softer than the mild steel. After reading reviews about a set of MIG pliers that performed poorly at cutting the MIG wire, I am quite content to use a set of pliers I already have that cut wire well. I know commercial MIG pliers can be used as a hammer, but I have not needed that feature and do not expect to.

    Real MIG pliers have square tips for better scraping, while needle nose pliers are rounded smooth on the upper surface. Perhaps a needle nose pliers could be ground to have an upper surface more suited for scraping without wearing the pointed tips too much.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Twist Drill Sharpening Helper1 month ago
    Twist Drill Sharpening Helper

    thank you for looking. A magnifying glass might be helpful when checking the grinding for a centered web.

    A few years ago I did an Instructable on sharpening drill bits using a jig once sold by Sears and still available many places. It worked quite well, if set up properly and tweaked during use. I tried to include some hints I learned by experience. For bits smaller than 3/16 inch a speciallycut wood block and an oil stone works quite well. You should be able to search for that Instructable and find it. I am on an iPhone and there are limitations.

    http://www.instructables.com/id/Sharpen-Your-Drill-Bits/

    Thanks.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Wood Bed Plane1 month ago
    Wood Bed Plane

    Thank you. This is still my only plane in the location where I made and keep it. I am surprised how often I use it, although I often use it to remove a little material, not for joining before gluing or some similar precision need. I have since watched some YouTube videos on trying an old wood bed plane. Often there are high spots or shallow spots that have developed through the years. Somehow when I was gluing up the bed on this plane the two center pieces dried in place with a little shallow area on the bottom of the bed. I put down a piece of fine sandpaper and moved the plane back and forth over it until the shallow area was gone. An old trick is to make a wavy line across the plane bed with a pencil. After sanding remnants of the line remain in the shallow area.

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  • Phil B commented on netzener's instructable One Tube AM Radio1 month ago
    One Tube AM Radio

    Back in the 1980s I was friends with an older couple who had a fairly new GM car. It had an odd problem. The dealer found a bad crankcase position sensor. I am currently 70 years old. Electronics, especially radio, always fascinated me. If you remember how stores sometimes sold off old or discontinued paperback books with a reduced price at the expense of a front cover torn away, I once saw just such a copy of "Modern Electronics" by Monroe Upton. Although printed in the 1950s, I did not get around to reading it until the 1990s and found several very useful things in it worth far more than the ten cents I think I paid for it. I never went as far with understanding electronic circuitry as I would have liked, nor did I get a HAM license as I once thought I might. One night in t...see more »Back in the 1980s I was friends with an older couple who had a fairly new GM car. It had an odd problem. The dealer found a bad crankcase position sensor. I am currently 70 years old. Electronics, especially radio, always fascinated me. If you remember how stores sometimes sold off old or discontinued paperback books with a reduced price at the expense of a front cover torn away, I once saw just such a copy of "Modern Electronics" by Monroe Upton. Although printed in the 1950s, I did not get around to reading it until the 1990s and found several very useful things in it worth far more than the ten cents I think I paid for it. I never went as far with understanding electronic circuitry as I would have liked, nor did I get a HAM license as I once thought I might. One night in the 1980s I talked to a Radio Shack clerk who had completed the NRI correspondence course. He said despite all of that, most of what he needed was to configure or repair the power supply for a device. Along that line, I did an Instuctable on reusing old cell phone chargers by dropping their output voltage with common diodes in series. And, about twenty years ago we had a portable phone with a base to which it sent and from which received its signal. We had problems with a lot of cross talk. I began to wonder if the problem was related to an insufficiently regulated AC/DC power supply. It was rated at 12 volts, but put out a few volts more. I clamped the output voltage with a 12 volt Zener diode and the crosstalk went away.  Back in the days when I was using my HeathKit dwell-tachometer I wanted a Power Xenon engine timing light. A friend had one powered by 120 volt AC wall power. He lent it to me.While I had it, I opened it and traced the circuitry. Now I know it was basically a voltage doubler circuit. I made my own and published an Instructable on it, too. It also served well until computer driven electronic ignition systems arrived. Now I have a resistor color code/Ohm's Law/LED calculator app. on my iPhone and use it fairly often, as in this Instructable on an LED water level indicator for our Keurig coffee maker with its charcoal colored water reservoir. Thank you for the updated versions of the vintage kit projects.

    Thank you for the information on the book business. There were no cautionary signs about legalities when I bought that book at a local malt shop around 1960. In it I read about how Edison noticed a black spot formed in the globe of his light bulbs shortly before they burned out. He wanted to get rid of the phenomenon so his customers would have longer lasting bulbs. I believe he attached a metal plate near where the spot formed and connected a galvanometer between the plate and the base. He noticed a faint current, but went no farther with it. According to what I read, DeForrest added a fine wire grid between the filament and the plate, and discovered he could control the rate of electron flow by adding or subtracting a charge to the grid wire. That brought the triode vacuum tube and a ...see more »Thank you for the information on the book business. There were no cautionary signs about legalities when I bought that book at a local malt shop around 1960. In it I read about how Edison noticed a black spot formed in the globe of his light bulbs shortly before they burned out. He wanted to get rid of the phenomenon so his customers would have longer lasting bulbs. I believe he attached a metal plate near where the spot formed and connected a galvanometer between the plate and the base. He noticed a faint current, but went no farther with it. According to what I read, DeForrest added a fine wire grid between the filament and the plate, and discovered he could control the rate of electron flow by adding or subtracting a charge to the grid wire. That brought the triode vacuum tube and a giant jump forward in electronics. A short time later I was asked to speak at my son's graduation from the 8th grade. I used that story as an encouragement to read and be curious about the smallest things. Nice to chat with you.

    You probably already know this. HealthKit manuals and schematics are available for download on-line. http://www.vintage-radio.info/heathkit/In 1973 I requested and received a HeathKit dwell-tachometer. It worked well after I read the instructions for use and realized the hook up leads connected in a different pattern than commercial home use dwel-tachometers. I used it until electronic ignition systems. Then I sold it to s friend with a shed full of antique autos.

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  • Phil B followed netzener1 month ago
      • One Tube AM Radio
      • Neon Goofy Lite
      • Switched Mode Dual Variable Power Supply
  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Twist Drill Sharpening Helper1 month ago
    Twist Drill Sharpening Helper

    Thank you for the suggestion.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Setting Up a Radial Arm Saw1 month ago
    Setting Up a Radial Arm Saw

    John,Your Craigslist find sounds like a great solution. My father-in-law had one of these saws. He used it in a big construction project for himself. He was always certain he would burn out a motor, so he got ahold of a second motor. He never needed it. He died 20 years ago and I have no idea where that motor or that saw are today. I used my saw enough that I replaced the motor bearings after about a dozen years. The switch is a problem. I replaced the original style switch with a pushbutton on/off switch, and that has worked well. The switch came from Radio Shack, and I have replaced it once. I think Lowe's or Home Depot might have something similar enough.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Setting Up a Radial Arm Saw1 month ago
    Setting Up a Radial Arm Saw

    If the cost of a rewind is prohibitive, you might find a motor ready to go at eBay. Or, one Instructsbles member contacted me to say he has been collecting Craftsman radial arm saw parts. I could ask him if he would mind if you contact him.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Setting Up a Radial Arm Saw1 month ago
    Setting Up a Radial Arm Saw

    I would talk to an electric motor shop and ask if the motor could be serviced while it is still in the yoke. I do not have any information on the wiring of the motor coils, other than what is on the lid to the connections box on top of the motor. As regards the $100 rebate, my 1972 saw is too old for the rebate, based on the serial number. Even if it were eligible, I would be responsible for shipping a 60 pound motor at my expense for $100 and for that I would have a good saw turned into a non-functioning saw. The safety video for that recall is silly. No one plants his hand on the line of the saw's travel and then uses the saw live.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Strange Toilet Leak1 month ago
    Strange Toilet Leak

    Thank you. I appreciate the information about the unusual leak you found. It is nice to hear from you.

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  • Remote Garage Opener to Chevrolet Equinox

    Please do not take my comment as an insult. I once published an Instructable on a modification to a Dremel. Several commented that newer Dremels come with that modification as a standard feature. They did not know older Dremels did not have that feature. I did not know newer Dremels have that feature. We all learned something. I was sharing information.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Spanner Wrench for a Watch Case1 month ago
    Spanner Wrench for a Watch Case

    The one problem with changing your own battery is that the "O" ring seal may need to be replaced. If it does not seal properly, perspiration may get into the watch and create other problems. Having the battery replaced by a shop means you will have a functioning "O" ring. So, there is that to be considered, too.

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  • Remote Garage Opener to Chevrolet Equinox

    My wife's new Hyundai Tucson has buttons for opening the garage door built into the rear view mirror. We only had to follow instructions for programming and the factory button opens our garage door. I am surprised this is not part of your Equinox. We have rented an Equinox a couple of times.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Setting Up a Radial Arm Saw1 month ago
    Setting Up a Radial Arm Saw

    The only time I removed my saw's motor the saw was new. Do you really need to remove the motor? Does the bevel adjustment work now? If it does, I would not remove the motor. If you do not have one, find and look at a manual on-line. Be careful about taking things apart only to look inside and clean them or paint them. One commenter took the brake assembly inside the arm and had a lot of difficulty getting it back together in working order. "If it ain't broke, don't fix it."

    The only time I removed my saw's motor the saw was new. Do you really need to remove the motor? Does the bevel adjustment work now? If it does, I would not remove the motor.If you do not have one, find and look at a manual on-line. Be careful about taking things apart only to look inside and clean them or paint them. One commenter took the brake assembly inside the arm apart and had a lot of difficulty getting it back together in working order. "If it ain't broke, don't fix it."

    The only time I removed my saw's motor the saw was new. Do you really need to remove the motor? Does the bevel adjustment work now? If it does, I would not remove the motor.If you do not have one, find and look at a manual on-line. Be careful about taking things apart only to look inside and clean them or paint them. One commenter took the brake assembly inside the arm apart and had a lot of difficulty getting it back together in working order. "If it ain't broke, don't fix it."

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  • Phil B's instructable My MIG Cart's weekly stats: 1 month ago
    • My MIG Cart
      1,276 views
      15 favorites
      6 comments
  • DIY Magnetic Hand-Saw Guide - Extremely Accurate Cuts!

    eBay still has a selection of classic miter boxes. They were what finish carpenters used before electric miter boxes appeared in the very late 1960s or early 1970s. The miter boxes would still be very functional, but the saws would be difficult to find. Sears had some models that were near professional quality, but also a lot of home duty models for every budget. Quality, capacity, and flexibility varied according to price.

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  • Phil B's instructable Keep MIG Settings As Set's weekly stats: 1 month ago
    • Keep MIG Settings As Set
      1,023 views
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  • DIY Magnetic Hand-Saw Guide - Extremely Accurate Cuts!

    The photo at the link is very much like what Sears had available around 1970 with magnetic mounts for the saw. The saw was a bit different in those days. The blade was solid and a heavier gauge with a reinforcing or backing strip about 3/4 inch wide on the top edge. The height of the blade was about four inches, not the narrow flexible strip held under tension to keep it straight. The magnets used then were not nearly as powerful as those from a hard drive. I saw these miter boxes in stores, but never used one. In 1970 I think a miter box like that cost around $50, maybe a little more. By comparison, gasoline was about 35 cents a gallon and a nice ten inch table saw was about $250 new.

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  • DIY Magnetic Hand-Saw Guide - Extremely Accurate Cuts!

    Around 1970 Sears offered a miter box that held the backsaw in place ahead of and behind the cutting area with magnets. Your Instructable gives me more confidence in that arrangement. Thank you.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable My MIG Cart1 month ago
    My MIG Cart

    Thank you. The pieces of steel I found and a need to keep the center of gravity low determined a lot of its final form. I also need to roll it into a limited space for storage when not in use. Someone could weld up square tubing, even black pipe, to make their own desired frame shape. I have a larger tank than many might choose. I had planned to buy a smaller tank, but the sales guy at Airgas showed me the bigger tank was only a very, very few dollars more than a tank half the size, and filling a larger tank is more cost effective than filling a smaller tank. The inspection and certification process is the same for a big tank as for a small tank.

    Thank you for looking and for commenting.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable My MIG Cart1 month ago
    My MIG Cart

    Thank you very much. I sent an e-mail to Miller, maker and donor of the welder and helmet, to thank them for making these prizes available. I got a nice e-mail response from the woman who works with their public relations telling me how much they appreciated the acknowledgement from me. I recognized her name because I had opportunity to go to SEMA in Las Vegas four years ago and met her in person at the Miller booth at that time. Thank you also to Instructables for allowing me to share things I have done, as well as to record them for my own use later when I have forgotten some details.

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  • Phil B posted an instructable My MIG Cart1 month ago
  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Keep MIG Settings As Set1 month ago
    Keep MIG Settings As Set

    It depends on the configuration of your welder's front. I used a scrap of Plexiglas already limited in size. It was probably a little short to reach between both sides of the raised front, so standoffs became attractive. I did not want the Plexiglas resting on the front face of the knob. Without the standoffs I could bump the Plexiglas and make the knob move just a little. I am also much more concerned about functionality than aesthetics. But, thank you for looking and for your comment.

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  • Radial Arm Saw Table Alignment -- An Easier Way

    This will be a very brief answer to get you started. The maker of the saw color coordinated the colors on the knobs with the angle scale indicators related to that knob's action, so, the green dot on the chrome spoon handle on the motor yoke releases the motor yoke. Then raise the indexing pin with the green knob and swivel the yoke to one of the other available positions. All knobs, levers, and angle indicators of the same color relate to the same adjustment. Let me know what is still a puzzle after you study the colors and the items of the same color.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Keep MIG Settings As Set1 month ago
  • Radial Arm Saw Table Alignment -- An Easier Way

    this will be a very brief answer to get you started. The maker color coordinated the colors on the knobs with the angle scale connected to that knob's action, so, the green dot on the chrome spoon handle on the motor yoke releases the motor yoke. Then rais the indexing pin with the green knob and swivel the yoke to one of the other available positions. All knobs, levers, and angle indicators of the same color relate to the same adjustment. Let me know what is still a puzzle after you study the tugs of the same color.

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  • Phil B commented on ttemple2's forum topic Help with antique three way switch1 month ago

    Some of these switches have knobs on a thin shaft with threads on the end. It may be some of the switches available have knobs that are removable and you can screw on your original brass end. Amazon allows shoppers to post questions in either a Q & A section on each product or as a comment to a specific reviewer. You could ask if the factory end can be removed and replaced with what you have.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Fix a Sink Stopper1 month ago
    Fix a Sink Stopper

    Thank you for your comment. I am pleased for you that your stopper works now. I hope the experience gives you more confidence to attempt even more things. It is always nice when you can keep the repairman out of your house. Your comment made my day.

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  • Phil B commented on ttemple2's forum topic Help with antique three way switch1 month ago

    One reviewer at Amazon used this switch to replace a switch on his 3-way Stiffel lamp.https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000HEKSB0/ref=pd_sim_60_1?ie=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B000HEKSB0&pd_rd_r=MZQGCP1B7ZWAW6CBH9J0&pd_rd_w=tPhXt&pd_rd_wg=vXGiN&psc=1&refRID=MZQGCP1B7ZWAW6CBH9J0

    I am guessing the wires connected to the parts of the Bakelite that are broken away. You said it is a three-way switch. is that for a three way bulb?

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Auto battery charger for 6 or 12 volt sytems1 month ago
    Auto battery charger for 6 or 12 volt sytems

    I made a diagram. Ignore the center tap. Use the two outside taps and a bridge rectifier or make your own from four diodes big enough to handle the maximum amperage you expect plus some for safety. The output voltage will be a bit larger than 24 volts, but not much. Check the polarity on the output before connecting to a battery.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Curing 2-cycle engine problems2 months ago
    Curing 2-cycle engine problems

    I do not have any experience with what you are asking. Can you adjust the carburetor to reduce or eliminate the blue smoke? Is the high pitch noise mechanical, like a dry bearing, or a whistling, like air rushing through a confined space?

    I am very happy for you. Thank you for the report. Repair manuals do not mention old gaskets that no longer seal properly. I suppose you are not expected to keep your engine, but to buy a new one.

    Is there any possibility the gasket can be installed upside down? I know that is impossible in many applications, but I have heard of it happening in other applications. A gasket upside down could plug some passageways and open others, which might make a whistling noise.

    If the engine is more than ten years old, I would definitely replace all gaskets. I think it is very likely the cure to your problem. All you need for the engine not to start is just a little too much air getting into the crankcase and making the mixture too lean. Gaskets hardened from age make that very possible. I bought some gasket material and made my own gaskets.

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  • Phil B commented on fullclip765's instructable 9v Battery Flash Light2 months ago
    9v Battery Flash Light

    I am curious about the broken flashlight from which you took the circuit board. Was the voltage input for it also rated at 9 volts? LEDs are rather sensitive to the current levels supplied to them. I recently did an Instructsble on how I added an LED to illuminate the water level in a Keurig coffeemaker. I wanted to use an LED flashlight normally requiring two small 3 volt batteries and I wanted to supply it with an old 9 volt battery removed from a smoke detector. I used a calculator app. for LEDs to learn the value of the resistor I needed to supply no more than 25 milliamperes of current to the flashlight. It worked very well, but could have burned up the LED if I had not properly limited the current with the resistor indicated by the special calculator.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable An Improvement to a Dremel Tool2 months ago
    An Improvement to a Dremel Tool

    The Dremel I have is from around 1990. It is not new.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Curing 2-cycle engine problems2 months ago
    Curing 2-cycle engine problems

    My engine would no longer start ten years after I bought it. Gaskets between the halves of the crankcase and between the carburetor and the crankcase hardened from age and no longer sealed. When I changed all of the gaskets the engine ran again.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Auto battery charger for 6 or 12 volt sytems2 months ago
    Auto battery charger for 6 or 12 volt sytems

    thank you for sharing what you did.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Oil Filter Wrench for Tight Spaces2 months ago
    Oil Filter Wrench for Tight Spaces

    Thank you. I think we all were forced into the screwdriver method at some point in life.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Curing 2-cycle engine problems2 months ago
    Curing 2-cycle engine problems

    I am sorry to hear of your engine problem. I would not lend my things to that friend again, unless the friend offers to pay for any damage to your engine caused by his error.4-cycle engines have oil in the crankcase to lubricate moving parts, especially the contact between the piston rings and the cylinder walls. 2-cycle engines get their lubrication from the special oil mixed with the gasoline. When that oil is not present in the fuel in the proper mixture, the danger is that destructive wear will occur in the engine quickly. A compression check would give a strong clue about the extent of damage. Once damage happens, there is no economical way to restore the engine. You could check on the cost of honing the cylinder walls and installing new piston rings, but it may be cheaper to buy a...see more »I am sorry to hear of your engine problem. I would not lend my things to that friend again, unless the friend offers to pay for any damage to your engine caused by his error.4-cycle engines have oil in the crankcase to lubricate moving parts, especially the contact between the piston rings and the cylinder walls. 2-cycle engines get their lubrication from the special oil mixed with the gasoline. When that oil is not present in the fuel in the proper mixture, the danger is that destructive wear will occur in the engine quickly. A compression check would give a strong clue about the extent of damage. Once damage happens, there is no economical way to restore the engine. You could check on the cost of honing the cylinder walls and installing new piston rings, but it may be cheaper to buy a new engine. If you choose to buy a new engine, look into a short block. It is the bulk on the engine and contains all moving parts, but does not include still useful things like the engine head, the ignition parts, and the carburetor. You would need to install those on the short block with new gaskets where parts need to seal. One choice you have would be to use the engine as is, but not use wide open speeds at which you get the visible smoke. If there is scoring on the cylinder walls, the looseness it causes with the piston could cause more wear faster than normal. You could remove the head for a visual inspection of the cylinder walls, but will need to install a new head gasket and torque the bolts to the proper amount. You or a repair shop may have a fiber optics device that allows you to peek inside through the hole for the spark plug. I wish I had better news for you.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Fountain Pen Problems2 months ago
    Fountain Pen Problems

    I am not much help. Somewhere I read that silver polish works by removing a little of the metal to get down to fresh metal. That could work against what you want if the gold color plating is already thin.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Restore Your WiFi Connection2 months ago
    Restore Your WiFi Connection

    Since your WiFi system works on your phone, the problem does not seem to be with your server or your modem or router. I am not sure what WiFi icon you normally have, but its disappearance could mean there is a problem in your Windows software. A restart of the computer may help. Or, you may need to use Disc Cleanup and Disk Defragmenter from within your Windows system. Since you said you are clueless, it may be that you have never run those self-diagnostic and self-cleanup tools. It is difficult to know what the exact problem is from a distance.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Arm Support for Welding2 months ago
    Arm Support for Welding

    Thank you for the very good suggestion. All of my welding is in my garage and usually on top of a rolling cart to which I added a 3/4 inch composite board top covered with sheet metal from our old washing machine and then bolted a vise to the added top. When doing that I did not plan for a lip.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Great Projects from Old How-to Magazines2 months ago
    Great Projects from Old How-to Magazines

    Thanks. Other than the photo of a press you included in your comment, I do not know what might be available in the old DIY magazines. I believe the is a way to search them, but navigating Popular Science is a little different from navigating Popular Mechanics, if I remember correctly.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable The Radial Arm Saw -- A Guide of Sorts2 months ago
    The Radial Arm Saw -- A Guide of Sorts

    What you have posted may help someone with a similar problem. Thank you. Enjoy your new saw. It is a great tool.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Welding Clamp for Thin Materials2 months ago
    Welding Clamp for Thin Materials

    Good suggestions. Thank you.

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  • Motion Control with Raspberry Pi and LIS3DHTR, 3-Axis Accelerometer, using Python

    I like what you have done. I certainly am not capable of doing what you have done. I do have a little 3-axis Omron pedometer that cost less than $35. It is very portable and the battery lasts more than a year. Your project would be fun and instructive. I have concerns about how practical it is, unless what you have done is designed to open the door of one's mind to other similar applications.

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