loading
4Instructables64,454Views34CommentsJoined April 15th, 2016

Tell us about yourself!

Complete Your Profile

Achievements

10K+ Views Earned a bronze medal
  • Venkes commented on Venkes's instructable Laser Scanning Microscope 4 days ago
    Laser Scanning Microscope

    Nice to hear. Thank you.

    View Instructable »
  • Venkes commented on Groover's instructable Pocket Laser Engraver.2 months ago
    Pocket Laser Engraver.

    You're welcome!

    View Instructable »
  • Venkes commented on Venkes's instructable Laser Scanning Microscope 2 months ago
    Laser Scanning Microscope

    Thanks, but a HW5P-1 is a photo transistor. I make use of the LDR that comes with the kit.

    View Instructable »
  • Venkes commented on Venkes's instructable Laser Scanning Microscope 3 months ago
    Laser Scanning Microscope

    Yes I know. Please read my comments there.

    View Instructable »
  • Venkes commented on Venkes's instructable Laser Scanning Microscope 3 months ago
  • Venkes commented on stoppi71's instructable scanning laser microscope with Arduino3 months ago
    scanning laser microscope with Arduino

    Hello stoppi71,In my opinion only the (re)writable ones are doped with a corresponding colour: bluish for DVD, reddish for blu-ray. If you lay a few readymade different types with the label side down on a table its hard to tell wich is wich, they are all silvery. I have used four different (red, green, blue and uv) lasers to magnify a cd, and the uv-type (shortest wavelength) has the sharpest picture (see my samples below). Which is on the opposite side of the optical disc spetrum.So look at my results and judge for yourself if it is worth to try, if it's not to much of an effort, to put in a DVD pick-up instead of a CD pick-up!The differences I get with an LDR are: (LDR without a pinhole) 4,2 V when in focus 1,1 V when nothing in the light path. (LDR With a pinhole): 3,6 V in focus and...see more »Hello stoppi71,In my opinion only the (re)writable ones are doped with a corresponding colour: bluish for DVD, reddish for blu-ray. If you lay a few readymade different types with the label side down on a table its hard to tell wich is wich, they are all silvery. I have used four different (red, green, blue and uv) lasers to magnify a cd, and the uv-type (shortest wavelength) has the sharpest picture (see my samples below). Which is on the opposite side of the optical disc spetrum.So look at my results and judge for yourself if it is worth to try, if it's not to much of an effort, to put in a DVD pick-up instead of a CD pick-up!The differences I get with an LDR are: (LDR without a pinhole) 4,2 V when in focus 1,1 V when nothing in the light path. (LDR With a pinhole): 3,6 V in focus and 0,3 V with nothing in the light path. I don't eliminate any offsetGreets,Ron.CD samples: Both a cd, 1st with uv, 2nd with red. I think also that the optical quality of my red laser's collimating lens isn't really good (what partially should explain the difference in image quality). In a laser pick-up however it must be excellent.

    View Instructable »
  • Venkes commented on Venkes's instructable Laser Scanning Microscope 3 months ago
    Laser Scanning Microscope

    Thank you!Please see my comment on your instructable page.

    View Instructable »
  • Venkes commented on stoppi71's instructable scanning laser microscope with Arduino3 months ago
    scanning laser microscope with Arduino

    It seems that we were developing an LSM on about the same time. You also managed to nail it! Well done! There are indeed differences in approach between our LSM's. Both work well but both has pro's and con's naturaly. Where mine ( "https://www.instructables.com/id/Laser-Scanning-Mic... for the interested!) has the freedom to use different lasers, yours is probably slightly easyer to build. Just a thought, I think you can get sharper images if you should use a DVD pick-up (red laser), or better, a blu ray pick-up (uv laser) instead of a cd pick-up( ir laser). Where a blu ray pick-up uses uv light, the shortest wavelength, and a cd pick-up ir light (in your design), the longest wavelength. The shorter the wavelength, the smaller the lightspot can be and will produce, theoretically,...see more »It seems that we were developing an LSM on about the same time. You also managed to nail it! Well done! There are indeed differences in approach between our LSM's. Both work well but both has pro's and con's naturaly. Where mine ( "https://www.instructables.com/id/Laser-Scanning-Mic... for the interested!) has the freedom to use different lasers, yours is probably slightly easyer to build. Just a thought, I think you can get sharper images if you should use a DVD pick-up (red laser), or better, a blu ray pick-up (uv laser) instead of a cd pick-up( ir laser). Where a blu ray pick-up uses uv light, the shortest wavelength, and a cd pick-up ir light (in your design), the longest wavelength. The shorter the wavelength, the smaller the lightspot can be and will produce, theoretically, the sharpest image. These differences in sharpness can you see in my results were images are taken with red, green and uv lasers.I really want to congratulate you with this result because I know what a long way you have traveled, just as I did.I am allways looking for ways to improve my builds (probably you do to!), so I'm gonna take a closer look at your photodiode solution as that is maybe a better way to detect the reflected light!Mine does half an hour to complete one (256x256) image. What I really want to know is: how long take an image with your LSM to complete?Greets,Venkes.

    View Instructable »
  • Venkes commented on Venkes's instructable Laser Scanning Microscope 3 months ago
  • Venkes's instructable Laser Scanning Microscope 's weekly stats: 3 months ago
    • Laser Scanning Microscope
      15,762 views
      159 favorites
      13 comments
  • Venkes commented on Venkes's instructable Laser Scanning Microscope 3 months ago
    Laser Scanning Microscope

    I don't know the type.

    Thank you.You're right about that. It's exactly what I thought. But as you may have read in my instructable, I tried that. I doesn't work fine because of the filter inside the pickup for taking care of producing multiple spots on the cd (for better tracking purposes) and that it's for one axis only, so you have to move the whole thing in the other axis as well. And taking the weight in considderation I think the inertia wil spoil the proces. And further more, you're very stuck to one laser. The solution I have used gives you the freedom of using different lasers. Besides that is it not clear how the light sensor in the pichup works. All these reasons have made me decide to make it just like I did. But if you are confident to do it otherwise, your really should do that. Maybe it turns ou...see more »Thank you.You're right about that. It's exactly what I thought. But as you may have read in my instructable, I tried that. I doesn't work fine because of the filter inside the pickup for taking care of producing multiple spots on the cd (for better tracking purposes) and that it's for one axis only, so you have to move the whole thing in the other axis as well. And taking the weight in considderation I think the inertia wil spoil the proces. And further more, you're very stuck to one laser. The solution I have used gives you the freedom of using different lasers. Besides that is it not clear how the light sensor in the pichup works. All these reasons have made me decide to make it just like I did. But if you are confident to do it otherwise, your really should do that. Maybe it turns out fine.

    I don't know the type.

    The LDR came with the official Arduino Uno starter pack.

    View Instructable »
  • Venkes commented on Venkes's instructable Laser Scanning Microscope 3 months ago
    Laser Scanning Microscope

    I know that. The idea behind this all was that I make an instructable that could be in reach for most technical hobbyists and that it will cost almost nothing to build. The lasers you mentioned are most probably not the lasers most hobbyists have, pricewise, in there possession. Probably everyone is in possession of a laser pointer and believe it or not you can do LSM with them. I've done it. On the movie and at the end of the instructable there are some examples I made and indeed the shorter the wave length the better it is as I mentioned in my instructable (by the way these examples has to be seen not bigger than 7 cm across, then the pixels match the screen res.). Further more, the build with a gas laser instead of an diode laser is also more complex because of the size and weight o...see more »I know that. The idea behind this all was that I make an instructable that could be in reach for most technical hobbyists and that it will cost almost nothing to build. The lasers you mentioned are most probably not the lasers most hobbyists have, pricewise, in there possession. Probably everyone is in possession of a laser pointer and believe it or not you can do LSM with them. I've done it. On the movie and at the end of the instructable there are some examples I made and indeed the shorter the wave length the better it is as I mentioned in my instructable (by the way these examples has to be seen not bigger than 7 cm across, then the pixels match the screen res.). Further more, the build with a gas laser instead of an diode laser is also more complex because of the size and weight of a gas laser. I think also that when you make use of an argon ion laser there is to much power and will burn holes in your specimen (it happend to me to with so little as 30mW!) because of the slow scan speed and the extremely small laser spot. I have a TEM00 HeNe laser I've used to make holograms and maybe I'll give it a try with it one day. Anyway thanks for your reply. Greets.Ron (Venkes).

    View Instructable »
  • Venkes commented on Venkes's instructable Laser Scanning Microscope 3 months ago
    Laser Scanning Microscope

    Thanks!

    Thank you! Now my ego grows a little bit.

    Nice to hear.

    View Instructable »
  • Venkes commented on Groover's instructable Pocket laser engraver.5 months ago
    Pocket laser engraver.

    Thank you!The mosfet's only task is to switch the laser on and off. Therefore the mosfet is powering a relais. The relais act like a switch so I think you can easely hook your laser, laser powersupply and step-down module to it if you considder the relais as a simple switch. I hope this wil help you further,Succes.P.s. Sorry for the late response, I did not get a notification from Instructables

    View Instructable »
  • Venkes commented on Venkes's instructable Quick, dirty and cheap laser engraver8 months ago
    Quick, dirty and cheap laser engraver

    Thank you!

    Thanks!

    You're welkom!

    Thanks.

    View Instructable »
  • Venkes followed Venkes8 months ago
  • Venkes commented on Venkes's instructable Quick, dirty and cheap laser engraver11 months ago
    Quick, dirty and cheap laser engraver

    It's been a while when I bought my laser at DTR's, Idon't see mine on their website anymore. What I had purchased at DTR's lasershop was:- A blue 2Watt laser diode, already pressed in a copper module;- A good lens (glass not plastic);- A suitable driver.The driver is very important because you can't hook the laser diode directly to a normal powersuply. They need to be current controled. The driver I had has to be tweaked to make sure there was not slow start. But you can find how to do that, on their website as well.Second important is the ability to switch the laser on and of by TTL, so you can use Arduino's pin 12 to switch directly the laser on and off.Cooling is very important too, so you have to buy an adaptor for the 12mm brass module or make one yourself. Thats what I did.On the...see more »It's been a while when I bought my laser at DTR's, Idon't see mine on their website anymore. What I had purchased at DTR's lasershop was:- A blue 2Watt laser diode, already pressed in a copper module;- A good lens (glass not plastic);- A suitable driver.The driver is very important because you can't hook the laser diode directly to a normal powersuply. They need to be current controled. The driver I had has to be tweaked to make sure there was not slow start. But you can find how to do that, on their website as well.Second important is the ability to switch the laser on and of by TTL, so you can use Arduino's pin 12 to switch directly the laser on and off.Cooling is very important too, so you have to buy an adaptor for the 12mm brass module or make one yourself. Thats what I did.On the other hand, you can buy a complete module with laser, driver, lens, cooling, TTL etc. You can find them on the web. But pay attention to the TTL: I've had seen lasers that switch the laser off with TTL high. You must have one that switch the laser on with TTL high. And no slow start!I hope this helps.

    View Instructable »
  • Venkes commented on Venkes's instructable Quick, dirty and cheap laser engraver11 months ago
    Quick, dirty and cheap laser engraver

    I don't have tested the limits of the laser in the machine with many differend materials but 2Watt's is reasonable strong and can burn through stuff with ease but has troubles with thick materials. Wood for instance is difficult, you can set it on fire and angrave it but cutting? Even with a 40Watt laser you have to engrave several times the same object to go through. But with this laser you can easely cut paper, plastic's, cardboard (see pic) etc. The color of the material is very important for the speed on with you cut/engrave.

    View Instructable »