loading
2
26Instructables2,634,929Views200 CommentsUK
I like making all sorts of stuff, out of found materials: furniture, wild food, whatever! I've learnt loads from generous people out there, so reuse any useful ideas that you find here...

Achievements

100+ Comments Earned a bronze medal
1M+ Views Earned a silver medal
Contest Winner First Prize in the Arduino Challenge
Contest Winner Grand Prize in the Outdoor Structures Contest
Contest Winner Grand Prize in the Reclaimed Wood Contest 2016
Show 3 More »
  • How to make traditional English pork pies

    Sounds good, but possibly messy!For most pies, hot is best.This type of pork pie is a picnic pie and intended to be eaten cold. The jelly needs to cool to set

    View Instructable »
  • DIY blacksmithing - Converting your barbecue into a forge then using it to recycle scrap metal into tools

    Thanks. Yes it was pretty simple. In the meantime, I realised that if you just want a decent hard steel blade and can't be bothered forging, you can use the steel from a disposable hand saw. Here's a cake slice I made: http://makingweirdstuff.blogspot.co.uk/2016/04/time-boxed-cake-slice.html

    View Instructable »
  • rosemarybeetle commented on rosemarybeetle's instructable How to make cider1 month ago
    How to make cider

    Hi, Thanks - hope it works for you.If you make some, post a pic in a comment. Always good to see.On metabisulphite, I normally only feel you need about 1/4 -1/2 teaspoon for 5 gallons. You don't need loadsYou can use Camden tablet which are 1 per gallon. Like a measured dose

    View Instructable »
  • rosemarybeetle commented on rosemarybeetle's instructable How to make cider1 month ago
    How to make cider

    Thanks - the first cider I made was actually juice that seeped out of apples I left in a bin and forgot. It fermented by itself. Was surprisingly just about drinkable. Next year just go for it. I'm sure you'll get something good out of it

    View Instructable »
  • rosemarybeetle commented on rosemarybeetle's instructable How to make cider1 month ago
    How to make cider

    The key thing to note now is how fast it is changing. If the SG doesn't change in a few days, it is so close to finished you should be OK to prime and bottleWhat I sometimes do in this case is to rack (siphon) the cider off the lees (the yeast sludge at the bottom). The remaining cider will still have enough yeast in to continue if it needs to, but it will be clearer when you bottle it.

    View Instructable »
  • rosemarybeetle commented on rosemarybeetle's instructable How to make cider2 months ago
    How to make cider

    Excellent - it will be about a week before it has got near to finishing, but it will slow down. Even if you haven't taken an original gravity reading, it is best to know the gravity is 1000 or below when you think about bottling. It's worth getting a hydrometer. They are cheap and can save the uncertainty.

    View Instructable »
  • rosemarybeetle commented on rosemarybeetle's instructable How to make cider2 months ago
    How to make cider

    You can choose to neutralise some of the acidity if you know the juice is really acidic. Adding some chalk (calcium carbonate) will do this, but it is best to do before fermentation

    yes, I agree with WillY7. the main thing is knowing it's finished fermenting so that adding priming sugar is the only way it will get more fermentation going. If you bottle it before it has stopped you can't be sure how much pressure will form in the bottle. Pretty much, let it stop, then filter off and leave settle to allow to clear a bit, then add some priming sugar

    View Instructable »
  • rosemarybeetle commented on rosemarybeetle's instructable How to make cider2 months ago
    How to make cider

    Hi there,in one sense the metal is probably not a health concern unless they were dirty with something - if so you could wash them. The main concern would be in getting iron in contact with the acidic juice that might make it taste metallic. Iron is not that reactive, but apple juice is quite acidic, so there will be some risk.You could do something like putting plastic bags or clingfilm round the poles. or other metal surfaces. That would greatly reduce the contact while you do the pressing. Even if it didn't completely eliminate it, it would be much less risky

    View Instructable »
  • rosemarybeetle commented on rosemarybeetle's instructable How to make cider3 months ago
    How to make cider

    Hi, sorry for taking ages to reply. It is best to ferment in large amounts (like 10+ litres, preferably 25 litres) as the temperature is much more stable, BUT it works fine in smaller containers as long as you keep it somewhere consistently warm.If you have 5 litres, you could use a demi-john (about a gallon,/ 5 litres)If you use a container that is much bigger than the liquid in it, there is a risk of more air getting in. You might get some oxidisation where the liquid goes a deeper amber or reddy-brown. In the worst case, scenario, allowing too muich air in can let too much airborne yeasts and bacteria get in.You should be OK, as long you get it started woth a strong yeast. The CO2 it gives off will form a protective gas layer above the juice. Yeast needs some oxygen I beklieve to re...see more »Hi, sorry for taking ages to reply. It is best to ferment in large amounts (like 10+ litres, preferably 25 litres) as the temperature is much more stable, BUT it works fine in smaller containers as long as you keep it somewhere consistently warm.If you have 5 litres, you could use a demi-john (about a gallon,/ 5 litres)If you use a container that is much bigger than the liquid in it, there is a risk of more air getting in. You might get some oxidisation where the liquid goes a deeper amber or reddy-brown. In the worst case, scenario, allowing too muich air in can let too much airborne yeasts and bacteria get in.You should be OK, as long you get it started woth a strong yeast. The CO2 it gives off will form a protective gas layer above the juice. Yeast needs some oxygen I beklieve to reproduce at th e beginning too

    Hi - good plan and yes the short answer is that you are right - the gap between cider surface and lid should be as small as possibleLong answer is:You should always be thinking about risk of spoilage (can ruin it) and oxidation (can change the taste and colour). The general air around us may have micro-organisms in it. and the juice you initially press will have loads of them in it. It will also have air in it. Fermentation gets rid of both.The initial sterilisation of the juice is all about killing off those potentially ruinous microbes. Yeast not only makes alcohol from sugar, it also crowds out and eliminates most other micro-organisms, stopping spoilage. Yeast breeding and fermenting also uses up all the oxygen in the juice (stopping oxidation and browning) So, after fermentation, i...see more »Hi - good plan and yes the short answer is that you are right - the gap between cider surface and lid should be as small as possibleLong answer is:You should always be thinking about risk of spoilage (can ruin it) and oxidation (can change the taste and colour). The general air around us may have micro-organisms in it. and the juice you initially press will have loads of them in it. It will also have air in it. Fermentation gets rid of both.The initial sterilisation of the juice is all about killing off those potentially ruinous microbes. Yeast not only makes alcohol from sugar, it also crowds out and eliminates most other micro-organisms, stopping spoilage. Yeast breeding and fermenting also uses up all the oxygen in the juice (stopping oxidation and browning) So, after fermentation, if you never take the lid off, then the cider should stay stable and not go off because the years has killed off the micro-competition, used up the oxygen and produced CO2 which sits on top of the ciderWhenever you lift the lid, and even more so when you transfer the cider, some new air gets in and you always risk new microbes getting in. So, it is always best to have as little air above the finished cider so that the risk is as low as it can be. If you sterilise AFTER fermentation, then you reduce the risk, but can't make it fizzy in the bottle.Handy tip - when you transfer the cider, always siphon it with the outlet end UNDER the surface. Don't let the cider pour into the new container from above causing bubbles or you will get loads of air dissolving in your cider and it will oxidise much more.Hope all that makes sense!

    that was meant to say not something to EAT, by the way!

    The sodium metabisulphate that releases sulphur dioxide is not something to ear, but is not anywhere near seriously poisonous for the sort of contact you make in cider making. The gas itself is irritant to your lungs (never try sniffing the powder - you'll get a nasty shock!)I don't worry to much. I use about a third of a teaspoon in 5 gallons. Don't use loads and loads or it will taste vileYou can get something called camden tablets that are mainly sodium metabislphate. the advantage is they are easy to use s you use one per gallon.

    View Instructable »
  • Tomahawk Survival Axe (that opens beers!)

    ha - love this. Using tools you've made for a specific need is so satisfying - good stuff.

    View Instructable »
  • How to Build a Bespoke Summerhouse From Reclaimed Wood and Save Hundreds!

    Cheers. I was quite chuffed with how well this turned out. Your kindly wows are much appreciated :)

    View Instructable »
  • rosemarybeetle commented on rosemarybeetle's instructable How to make cider4 months ago
    How to make cider

    Hi,If you don't use pesticides, then that is good. The health risks from that are far more dangerous than the odd worm. Even if you ate a maggot, it would be extremely unlikely to do you any harm at all.To be honest, I don't worry about worms at all. If you have loads of apples, then checking out each one individually is a lot of work. I don't consider the worms themselves a problem. They can cause apples to rot by making holes in them by which germs get in, but it is the rot (especially any vinegar bacteria which will turn alcohol into vinegar) I just reject any apples that are obviously gone bad and are rotten. If you only include good looking apples and sterilise the juice, then you should be fine. I chuck the bad apples away when collecting and for any that I miss once I have got th...see more »Hi,If you don't use pesticides, then that is good. The health risks from that are far more dangerous than the odd worm. Even if you ate a maggot, it would be extremely unlikely to do you any harm at all.To be honest, I don't worry about worms at all. If you have loads of apples, then checking out each one individually is a lot of work. I don't consider the worms themselves a problem. They can cause apples to rot by making holes in them by which germs get in, but it is the rot (especially any vinegar bacteria which will turn alcohol into vinegar) I just reject any apples that are obviously gone bad and are rotten. If you only include good looking apples and sterilise the juice, then you should be fine. I chuck the bad apples away when collecting and for any that I miss once I have got the haul back, they go on the compost heap.

    View Instructable »
  • How to Build a Bespoke Summerhouse From Reclaimed Wood and Save Hundreds!

    Thanks - pretty blown away by winning. It was one of my most enjoyable builds, so that makes it even sweeter. I would def recommend recycling pallets into timber/lumbar. Can save a fortune!

    Have to say your tree house is a pretty epic structure too. Great job

    Cheers - I liked your Vardo camper. Slanty walls ain't easy. It was pretty tricky getting the hexagonal angled roof-ends on my build, so I can appreciate your work here. Great stuff

    View Instructable »