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  • sjowett commented on sjowett's instructable RetroPie Arcade Cabinet (Cocktail Style)1 month ago
    RetroPie Arcade Cabinet (Cocktail Style)

    Not much at all really - there would be no need to rotate the screen (in the boot config.txt file) as I assume you would use it in 'normal' landscape mode. With many arcade games there is a 'in game' menu that is accessed by using a keyboard and hiting the "Tab" key after the game has started. In this menu you may find a "Upright or Cocktail" setting which you need to choose the first time you run that game.That's it -can't think of anything more of hand!Simon

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  • sjowett commented on sjowett's instructable RetroPie Arcade Cabinet (Cocktail Style)2 months ago
    RetroPie Arcade Cabinet (Cocktail Style)

    Hi TonyI've added a picture which should help. I'm assuming in my answer that you will be using the monitor in the landscape format not portrait as I have with the dell 17". Anyway, the width is about 370mm but don't forget the timbers taper in at 5 degrees. So, both the 24" (definitely) and hopefully the 26" would fit in. The larger monitor would be a very tight fit though. As for the length dimension the hinges take up about 70mm in from one end of the cabinet, if you centralize the monitor then you'd be taking 2 x 70mm from the interior length (which is 660). 660-140=520mm hmm this means that even the smaller monitor is going to be a squeeze, possible best to just make the cabinet sides a bit longer.Another thing to consider is the location of the Raspberry Pi a...see more »Hi TonyI've added a picture which should help. I'm assuming in my answer that you will be using the monitor in the landscape format not portrait as I have with the dell 17". Anyway, the width is about 370mm but don't forget the timbers taper in at 5 degrees. So, both the 24" (definitely) and hopefully the 26" would fit in. The larger monitor would be a very tight fit though. As for the length dimension the hinges take up about 70mm in from one end of the cabinet, if you centralize the monitor then you'd be taking 2 x 70mm from the interior length (which is 660). 660-140=520mm hmm this means that even the smaller monitor is going to be a squeeze, possible best to just make the cabinet sides a bit longer.Another thing to consider is the location of the Raspberry Pi and how close it is the the back of the monitor, although this is easy to overcome by placing the platform a bit lower.All the bestSimon

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  • sjowett commented on sjowett's instructable RetroPie Arcade Cabinet (Cocktail Style)2 months ago
    RetroPie Arcade Cabinet (Cocktail Style)

    I've update the step to reflect this - the finding and loading of the roms is definately the most challenging to get right!!!!

    Try putting the roms in the "Arcade" folder.

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  • sjowett commented on sjowett's instructable RetroPie Arcade Cabinet (Cocktail Style)2 months ago
    RetroPie Arcade Cabinet (Cocktail Style)

    I don't think so, the RetroPie and the various emulations seem to be configurable for resolution (if need be). However, I did not have to make any adjustments for the games I've tried to date.

    Hi Jo1) 4:3 it is from an old Dell 17" monitor2) The screen orientation change is set up in each game rom you load up. Once the game has loaded, (using a keyboard) you hit the "Tab" key and this brings up an 'in game' menu. Here you can set a number of parameters (or dip switches, this is a reference to the original set-up where individual micro switches inside the machine could change parameters). One of the parameters you can set is "upright" or "cocktail". This data seems to save ok between boots so you shouldn't need the keyboard connected permanently.Simon

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  • sjowett commented on sjowett's instructable RetroPie Arcade Cabinet (Cocktail Style)2 months ago
    RetroPie Arcade Cabinet (Cocktail Style)

    I think the Pi 3 should be ok for most early games. Of course as you move into the more highly rendered 3D games I'm guessing a PC with a dedicated video card may be required. I hope your build goes well!Simon

    Thanks so much, my next project is ......hmmmmm

    Thanks so much for the feedback....as for a drink holder, absolutely!

    Good idea Chris - it too makes me nervous when the lid is up! I would have preferred a 3rd glass clip at the hinge end also. Now the project is finished I guess the need to be inside the machine is much less. With a WiFi dongle you can load games onto the Pi without accessing the inside - perhaps I'll add another step!!!

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  • sjowett commented on sjowett's instructable RetroPie Arcade Cabinet (Cocktail Style)2 months ago
    RetroPie Arcade Cabinet (Cocktail Style)

    next week I think. Game on!

    Yes, I used a Pi 2 which I already had on hand. If buying new I'd definitely go for a Pi 3 as the price is now the same as the older model. Also, the ControlBlock is such a good and seamless integration I've got to recommend that also. The result is a much smaller physical and power footprint.

    Thanks - much appreciated!

    ...Glad you like it!

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  • sjowett commented on sjowett's instructable RetroPie Arcade Cabinet (Cocktail Style)2 months ago
    RetroPie Arcade Cabinet (Cocktail Style)

    Thanks for the positive feedback PeterCheersSimon

    Hi mstone25 - yes full details on step 3. Its not a cheap build but you could do something similar for a fraction of the costs Incurred. For a budget build you would forget the "T" moulding, leave out the glass top and perhaps the artwork could be hand drawn (but not by me I have no talents in that department)!CheersSimon

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  • Capacitive Discharge (CD) Welder for battery tabs

    Ok I've updated the instructable and added a number of new steps covering the circuit. I hope this helps!

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  • Capacitive Discharge (CD) Welder for battery tabs

    I'll look inside my welder this weekend and take some more photos and jot down some details to see if I can help.

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  • Capacitive Discharge (CD) Welder for battery tabs

    Wow that was sophisticated for the time! ...as for a welding voltage of 100-400v!!!You might be interested in this great resource for electronic spot weldinghttps://endless-sphere.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=...There are loads of useful links on the first page of this forum post.

    The connections on the LCD end can be confusing as it depends on how the manufacturer has labeled the PCB - google search for st7920 images and you will see what I mean.To solve this 'off line' Id suggest just loading up the u8glib example to your Arduino and getting that working first. If you are still struggling then I can take a photo of my LCD but that means going under the lid and will take me a day or so too do.

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  • Capacitive Discharge (CD) Welder for battery tabs

    Yes - its a typo in the sense that I connected my screen with the 3 digital outputs 13, 11 and 12 (not 18, 16, 17 as the comment suggests). the line is a copy and paste from the u8glib example and I forgot to update the comment.

    There are some other basic versions out there using a car battery but with this method you can control the amount of energy closely by changing the charging voltage of the capacitors. The build is basically a copy of the equipment that the manufacturers use in commercial production.The value of the pots are not important. A linear (rather than a logarithmic) pot will give you better control. FYI I think I used a 10k pot.

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