Paradoxes

Just a place to discuss paradoxes (an immpossible statement) like The statement to the left is false the statement to the left is true

Posted by E-R-IC 9 years ago


Machine that turns itself off

Hello, I recently watched this video on youtube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KxaWvJ-ziXA&feature=player_embedded It is easy to see why this machine is a must-have...its simply awesome! Unfortunately I have no clue how to make it and which parts to use..would anyone here be able to make this epic device? Regards Peter

Posted by pbne04 7 years ago


Are there any real paradoxes? Answered

I'm interested in paradoxes, like "You cannot prove a negative" as a statement of fact. Because I'm thinking these things are only apparent paradoxes, and I'd like some more to think about. L

Asked by lemonie 5 years ago


Jevons Paradox

I recently read a thought-provoking article in the New Yorker: "The Efficiency Dilemma" by David Owen. The main gist of the article is that as our machines use less energy, we use them more, thus negating any environmental benefit we hope to achieve. This is known as "Jevons Paradox". You can read the abstract and article here, but you have to be a subscriber for the full article. You can read a commentary, with excerpts, here. Please discuss...

Posted by aeray 7 years ago


EPR (Einstein Podolsky Rosen) paradox

. Following a link in one of kelseymh's posts, I started reading the Wikipedia page on Bell's Theorem. Before I got through the first sentence of the Overview, I got sidetracked on the EPR paradox (read about it before, but found I had forgotten or misunderstood a lot of it). A lot of it still doesn't make sense. They didn't teach us a lot a quantum physics back in the '70s. heehee. Looks to me like I need to understand EPR before I try to go any further. Any volunteers to try to explain it so that Joe Plumber can understand?. TIA

Posted by NachoMahma 9 years ago


How many pieces counts my knex ball machine Paradox? Answered

Hi everyone! Are you ready for a new piece contest? I hope so, because it has arrived! Here is my only question for you: How many pieces counts my knex ball machine Paradox? You can only enter one answer, that’s the only important rule. Prizes: 1st place: 1 year pro memebership and a patch 2nd place: 6 months pro membership and a patch 3rd place: 3 months pro membership and a patch 4th place: a patch 5th place: a patch The contest closes Thursday, 8 August 2013. Good luck! ~Sandroknexmaster~ ___________________________________________ Results! Here are the official results: Grand Total: 30674 pieces! Ranking: 1st gargamel602 (29467)                 1 year pro memebership and a patch! 2nd hunter999 (28500)                      6 months pro membership and a patch! 3rd iceng (28374)                                3 months pro membership and a patch! 4th iloveknexforever (27562)             a patch! 5th collinjo12 (27000)                        a patch! 6th knexknexknexknex (26750) 7th coolananias101 (35000) 8th Blue Mullet 2 (25000) 9th Sorunome (24000) 10th Shadowman39 (22342) 11th KneXtreme (18002) Thanks for participating, if not thanks for watching! ~Sandroknexmaster~

Asked by sandroknexmaster 4 years ago


Home Automation Instructables!

Home automation is the reserve of those with actual money. How about some instructables that do home tasks for you, maybe a doorbell-to-USB hack, or others? what are your ideas? Paradox Detected.

Posted by paradoxdetected 8 years ago


I can't reply to comments or answer questions

   I wanted to write it in the previous topic, but I can't post comments... which was the thing I wanted to comment on. A paradox...   It's really annoying and makes me look seriously rude, because I can't reply to the answers to my questions.

Posted by gruffalo child 7 years ago


How do you establish software to run in virtual mode on System 7 64 bit?

I have enabled Virtualization Technology on my new Sys 7 machine.  I want to run Paradox in a DOS window as I did on my XP machine. What's the procedure to run software in the virtual mode? Thanks Charles

Asked by chas-62 6 years ago


Search problems

Ever since the front page was redone with the current version I have a harder time searching for things, like if I search for "orrery" I get 4 results, none of which are https://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-Build-a-Paradox/  also for as long as I've tried to use it, the mobile site search results are horrendous. it finds tons of 'ibles that aren't even remotely related to what I've searched for, or match one word of my query at best. what gives?

Posted by thealeks 5 years ago


A Town Called Eureka Themed Instructables!

Hi there! I'm new here, but I've always thought (whilst lurking about) that some Town Called Eureka themed Instructables would be good!Some starter ideas...Crazy sonic cannonsLittle portable cookersGreen transportHover-anything!Super sci-fi pocket tools - Lazer saws ectAssistive technologies like super souped-up wheelchairsIf you have any ideas, share them here!Paradox Detected.

Posted by paradoxdetected 8 years ago


I hate April Fool .......

.I just wanted to say it : I hate April Fool ...............I'm perfectly aware that when it's about humour and jokes, I can be a real retarded kid or a real little rascal (sometimes both at the same time)...For instance, just to give you a sample, when I wrote "I hate April Fool", the "funny hemisphere" of my brain immediately computed a risky (and probably stupid and immature) pun :"I hate April Fool ........ 'cause this girl is a real pain !"Well ...... and paradoxically, despite I find many April Fool jokes funny, I hate this day.Why ?Because :1) every little "unexpected" (and plausible) information seems suspicious.2) some extremely serious persons (teammates or superior) tries to be cool only this day, and become ridiculously serious again the day after ......... and paradoxically, their April Fool sense of humour is as low as their seriousness is high the rest of the year (this is a great source of disappointment to see how stupid can be someone you respected for his/her intelligence).3) I don't remember #3 .... who really care about it anyway ???Voila ...That was my April Fool rant.Wow ! I feel better know !=o]

Posted by chooseausername 10 years ago


Can someone tell me what Physics (and probably Engineering )is?

I am about to start my last year at school (1 September), with made me think of what am I going to do in a year. Before, I was sure that I want to do Physics in university, but somehow I realised that (probably) REAL Physics should have little connection with what I enjoy. I love tinkering with stuff, reading books and learning things from them (I learned all the STR I know by myself), making something funny (Tesla coils, ellipse compasses... You know the sort), learning how it all works, understanding things by finding and solving problems (my current topic is wet hydrodynamics), thinking about paradoxes, and solving puzzles.  It all seems like a game I love to play alone and with my friends, and which we occasionally teach to some younger kids.  My friends, who have just finished undergraduate year 1 can't tell me anything constructive, so can someone tell me what science is? I know the topic is a bit daft, but it's quite important for me. I will certainly ask the same thing everywhere and not once, but still...

Posted by gruffalo child 6 years ago


turkey tek- Finalist

Turkey tek is a finalist in the Laser Cutter Challenge for:Interactive Multitouch DisplayHelp judge the contest by rating this forum post! For those that care what I would do with a laser cutter:1. I will use the laser cutter to shape young minds; precisely.2. I will use the laser cutter to engrave space filling curves on everything...even other space filling curves.3. I will use the laser cutter to build up furniture out of layers of cardboard.4. I will use the laser cutter to build the structural elements of another laser cutter. High power laser diodes are getting incredibly cheap these days. Once I have time to understand how to build high current pulsed power supplies without current overshoot, itsa done deal. 5. I will use the laser cutter to fairly divide complicated pies among multiple individuals. Coupled with cheap desktop FDM (food deposition manufacture) machines, you will soon be able to download a fractal pie from the internet, fabricate it, and then cut it into little tiny fractaline pieces, all the while not wearing any pants.6. I will use the laser cutter in a massive alternate reality game I've been planning for several years which will involve fabricating 2**12 unique procedurally generated puzzles.7. I will use the laser cutter to double the number of gold spheres I own by making the byzantine, low kerf cuts required to implement the Banach-Tarski paradox8. I will use the laser cutter to efficiently remove corporate logos from consumer goods. This is something I currently do with sandpaper or an exacto knife, but with a laser cutter, I would offer to do it FREE for anyone who wanted to send me their cellphone, mouse, laptop, etc.9. I will use the laser cutter to machine microfluidic devices for experimental kitchen use.10. I will use the laser cutter to piece aperiodic quilts and quilts of varying curvatures 11. I will use the laser cutter to do anything any other finalist proposes to do, twice!

Posted by turkey tek 10 years ago


Crows and Ravens in Mythology.

Crows n RavensFor centuries the corvids, ravens and crows in particular (corvus corax is the Latin name for the common raven and corvus corone for the carrion and hooded crows), have had a special place in the mythology of various cultures. In modern times this fascination has barely diminished. From Edgar Allen Poe's literary classic to the film of James O'Barr's cult graphic novel "The Crow", these birds still exert a powerful hold over the psyche of a significant fraction of the population. The Goths who paint their faces with white make-up and the weekend warriors who expect Raven to take them to the Otherworld to meet the dead do not see the same animal as the farmers who set up decoys in order to shoot large numbers of them every year in late spring. This is, however, typical of a creature that presents a paradox wherever one looks.Corvids are sociable birds. They tend to form social groups, and this can be seen particularly in the case of rooks, which stay in their flocks all year round. Ravens, the largest of the family, reaching as much as 3 feet from beak to tail, form groups as juveniles, pairing off into lifelong monogamous and extremely territorial relationships at around the age of three. The courtship can involve such fun and games as synchronised snow sliding, and, of course, the synchronised flight test. The corvids can be found all over the world, and are the largest of the passeriformae, or songbirds. The common raven is widely distributed throughout the Northern hemisphere, and the adaptability and intelligence of this family have made it extremely successful.As far as the mythology goes, the first confusion arises over the distinction between Crow and Raven, at least on the European side of the Atlantic. The two appear, in many instances, to be interchangeable, and the appearance of one or the other in a story depends as much on which author is transcribing it as it does on story itself. Whereas John Matthews 1 gives Bran the raven almost exclusively, Miranda Jane Green 2 ascribes to the God's companion animal either the crow or the raven, much as both authors do for the Morrigan. The confusion on the American side of the Atlantic is not so profound. There is a distinct geographical trend in the likelihood of Raven appearing in a story, and so we will start our examination there.

Posted by Goodhart 10 years ago


"It's not like everyone who does DIY is a communist!" - Instructables in the Financial Times

I get attributed my favorite quote so far in DIY fanatics find a cyber showcase: "It's not like everyone who does DIY is a communist."Eric Wilhelm was studying for his PhD in mechanical engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2000 when he decided that he needed an athletic pursuit. So he took up kite surfing, a sport that was then in its infancy.Because kite surfing was so new, there were no established manufacturers producing reliable equipment. So Mr Wilhelm decided to make his own. He began sewing kites from rip-stop nylon and crafting boards from plywood. "It's a perfect sport for an engineer," he says. "You can build all your own gear."Mr Wilhelm posted instructions and pictures of his craftsmanship on his personal web page. It soon gained a following, and readers e-mailed to ask where they could find documentation of similar projects.The website evolved into Instructables, a San Francisco-based portal, and Mr Wilhelm is its chief executive. The business employs 10 and registers 5m unique visitors a month. The site, Mr Wilhelm explains, serves as a sort of collective repository for creative types who want to show off their wares.More broadly, Instructables is a symbol of the latest evolution of a do-it-yourself culture of invention that has been the lifeblood of California's Silicon Valley high-technology industry. Apple, Google and Hewlett-Packard are just three global companies that began with a couple of creative tinkerers experimenting in a garage. ...But isn't there something incongruous in a profit-seeking marketplace for specialised goods that are supposed to be the antidote to big box shopping? Herein lies the paradox of the DIY tech ethos: much as it would like to escape the confines of the throwaway economy, it cannot exist too far outside consumer culture.Mr Wilhelm of Instructables does not see a conflict. The DIY movement, he says, "is not anti-capitalist...It's a backlash against mass market. It's not like everyone who does DIY is a communist."More news and press about Instructables here.

Posted by ewilhelm 8 years ago


What is a wavefunction?

In the Physics topic on the EPR paradox, NachoMahma asked about wavefunctions and "collapse."Let's put aside the whole "collapse" issue -- not all physicists agree that it is a sensible concept. NM's comment has a link to the Measurement Problem, and I'm not a good enough theorist or philsopher to contribute to that argument.What is the wavefunction? "Is wavefunction only a convenient way to say it's located somewhere close to here, but we're not sure exactly where until we measure it?""At any particular point in time/space the object is in a definite spot with a definite set of properties, but we can only make a reasonable guess?"No. The wavefunction, spread out over all of space (I'm speaking non-relativistically here, but the formal interpretation applies to spacetime), is the fundamental "thing" in QM. "Objects" are wavefunctions. If the wavefunction is localized (non-zero for a small contiguous set of coordinates, zero everywhere else) then treating it like a particle makes sense. Otherwise, it doesn't; the thing behaves like a wave, showing diffraction, interference, and lots of other effects. My preference, when I talk about these things, is to just call them "quanta." They are not particles, they are not waves; they are their own kind of entity with well defined, if really hard to understand, behaviour.How do I get to that point? Well, quantum mechanics is one example of a "field theory" (electromagnetism is the most familiar classical field theory). The equations we write down (the Schrödinger equation non-relativisitically, the relativistic Dirac and Klein-Gordon equations) to describe how quanta behave are coupled partial differential equations (PDEs), which relate the values (and derivatives) of the field at every point in space to their evolution in time.A PDE which relates the time and spatial properties of a function is either a wave equation (if the solutions are sines and cosines) or a diffusion equation (if the solutions are exponentials). The Schrödinger equation is a wave equation, and we call the solutions wavefunctions. Electromagnetism also has a wave equation, which is how we get radio, light, etc.The difference is that the functions in EM are "real valued:" the value of the field at each point in space/time is a regular floating-point number (the "phase" in EM is determined by the relative values of the field and nearby points). The wavefunction is a '''complex valued''' field -- at each point in space/time, the field has both an amplitude and a phase (or equivalently a real and an imaginary component). This means that wavefunctions can interfere in ways more complex than simply "adding" or "subtracting", which can have quite interesting consequences.You get probabilities by taking the square (norm) of the wavefunction. This procedure gives you a real value, a probability, at each coordinate. When you make a measurement, those probabilities determine which coordinate value you see as the "location" of the quantum. The actual result is random, but that isn't because "we're not sure exactly." The quantum objective does not have a single coordinate location until we make the measurement.How that happens, whether by "collapse," "decoherence," "many worlds splitting" or something else, is a subject of intense philosophical and experimental argument.

Posted by kelseymh 9 years ago


Failed Experimentation : AI : My new creature is alive !

.It's alive !Alive, yes, but not as much intelligent than expected ..........Instead of watching a stupid movie at TV, I decided to write a tiny AI programme all in PHP.My goal was to get some functionalities comparable to logic programming languages like Prolog.In simpler words : I wanted to create a programme that could learn facts, and find the solutions to some logical problems.For instance :> blue is colour.Okay.> carrot is vegetable.Okay.> blue is colour ?Yes.> blue is vegetable ?No.> carrot is colour ?No.etc.So far, I can teach it facts in the form of 3-words-affirmations, and I can ask it questions and definitions, and the creature is able to find some connections between facts.Experimentation #1 : > red is colour.Okay> black is colour.Okay> orange is colour.Okay> orange is fruit.Okay(Here, we have a trap : orange is both a color and a fruit.)> red is colour ?Yes> black is fruit ?No> orange is colour ?Yes> orange is fruit ?Yes(Good. The beast did not fall in the trap.)> translate : red- "colour"> translate : orange- "colour"- "fruit"> translate : colour- "red"- "black"- "orange"Good ! The beast can give a sense to the words it learned.Experimentation #2 :> Paul is human.Okay> human eat fruit.Okay> apple is fruit.Okay> human is animal.Okay> animal eat meat.Okay> animal is mortal.OkayNow, let's see if it can "chain" the facts in a logical manner :> translate : Paul- "human"Here it should have replied : "human", "animal" and "mortal", since human are animals, and animals are mortal ...Let's see how it defines "Paul" :> define : Paul- Paul is humanMy creature seems obviously narrow minded ...Let's quiz it now :> Paul is apple ?No> Paul is fruit ?No> Paul is human ?Yes> human is Paul ?Yes> Paul is Paul ?Yes> Paul eat fruit ?Yes> Paul eat apple ?Yes> Paul is animal ?Yes> Paul eat meat ?No> Paul is mortal ?YesAs we can see, it successfully (and surprisingly) replied correctly to each question by connecting facts together, excepted for "Paul eat meat ?".At this question, it should have replied "yes", since it knows that "Paul is human", "human is animal" and "animal eat meat". But it did not ... ... and it's bizarre since it can reply correctly to "Paul is mortal ?", from "Paul is human", "human is animal" and "animal is mortal", or to "Paul eat apple ?" from "Paul is human", " human eat fruit" and "apple is fruit" ...Interesting, isn't it ? =o)If you want, you can submit your facts and questions to my experimental creature (which has no name yet) =o)What would be interesting also, is to confront it to a "paradox" just to see how it behaves ! =o)20080625 : For those of you who would like to have a look at the guts of the beast, here is available the source code.However, keep it mind it's a spaghetti-code and many function names are in french (as well as comments).Also, this version relies on MySQL to store and query facts (I'm planning to replace it with simple arrays though), which make the code slightly more complicated than required ...The main code makes less than 250 lines =o)There is no direct input interface : instead, it use scripts (exp_*.php) that call functions. For example :declarer("red","is","colour"); // ... which is slightly more complicated than what I showed above for the sake of comprehension and simplification !

Posted by chooseausername 9 years ago


Is working with your hands better than just with your head?

I saw this on the BBC, and was so impressed I've reproduced the whole thing here: By Tom de Castella Journalist If the new year and inevitable return to work leaves you yearning for change, is working with your hands the answer? The time for reflection is nigh - a new year, a new you. But is that workstation you've slotted back into looking depressingly familiar? As millions of workers drag themselves back into the office to contemplate another 12 months of drudgery, many will be wondering if they are in the right job. Writer and mechanic Matthew Crawford thinks a lot of us would be better off trading in our mouse for a screwdriver. His recent book, The Case for Working With Your Hands, has been a huge hit in his native United States, praised by critics and politicians alike. Mr Crawford, who used to run a Washington think tank but now mends motorbikes, says it is no wonder people are miserable at work. Jobs have become so specialised and process driven that it is hard to see what difference you are making. And in those rare cases where one's impact is obvious, the result may seem pointless. Jealousy "A lot of us are plagued with a sense of uselessness," he says. "I've created a brand - what good is that? So I've persuaded people to buy something they didn't need." When running a think tank, he says he honestly could not see the rationale for being paid at all, and wondered what tangible goods or services he was providing to anyone. Then he opened a motorbike repair shop and was surprised to find he was not just happier, but more intellectually stimulated. The life of a tradesman is a varied existence, mixing practicality with logic and problem solving, he says. "Imagine you're an electrician, you're installing a conduit pipe and have to bend around the corners to make everything line up. It's the kind of work that requires improvisation and adaptation. It can never be reduced to following set procedures." Not only that, the earning potential for a tradesman is greater than in many office jobs. For instance, a skilled mechanic is likely to earn more than a sociology graduate working in publishing, he argues. Not everything about manual work is rosy. He warns that furniture making is not a good career move - Ikea can undercut you by employing workers in China for a fraction of the price. But a range of trades that need to be done on site cannot be outsourced to low wage economies. After new year introspection, January and February are traditionally one of the busiest periods for moving jobs. Mr Crawford believes doing a trade can make you happier. 'Middle-class paradox' "It offers small moments of confirmation, like when the bike you're mending starts up and runs. Small satisfactions like that can be elusive at a huge organisation with vast layers of management, where the criteria by which you're measured are ambiguous." The Times columnist Giles Coren recently tried working with his hands for the BBC Two show Giles and Sue Live the Good Life. Despite his on-screen schtick of appearing to hate everything the duo are asked to do, he fell in love with it. "I found chasing the chickens and weeding the allotment immensely satisfying," he says. "The pain... was making the television show." He agrees with Mr Crawford that modern life has been blighted by a series of alienating processes, often carried out on mobile phone, laptop and e-mail. In this way, his chosen career - journalism - has been stripped of its sense of adventure and human contact. "Even 15 years ago when I started as a reporter, you left the office to do a story. You went to investigate, visited people and used the cuttings library. Now I just sit... and Google. It's terrible, I wish I was a fireman." Despite his columnist's salary, he is jealous of those whose jobs have a clear purpose like the gardener and cleaner. "My gardener Brian comes in to do the garden every two weeks. He takes his shirt off in the summer and smokes a rollie. I can see him through the window, but I'm sitting indoors, staring at the screen to pay for this guy - it's the classic middle-class paradox." Rory Sutherland, vice-chairman of advertising firm Ogilvy UK, agrees that working with your hands does offer greater satisfaction in the short term. But manual workers lack something many of us crave - influence. Jobs like advertising where you "work with your head" may seem futile, but the ideas they come up with really do change the world, he says. "Five years ago someone worked out that you could have one size lid for the three different sizes of coffee cup that cafes have. Ok, it's emphatically not the cure for cancer, but it's through millions of little ideas like this that we get richer as a society." Perception of value Television dramas like Mad Men depict the office to be a place of invigorating competition, sexual tension and creativity. However stylised the portrayal, Mr Sutherland says there is a definite buzz to working around like-minded people - one that tradesmen miss out on. "People partly enjoy work because it's social, but working with your hands can be lonely." And he believes that experienced trades people are often economically undervalued due to the perverse way that consumers ascribe worth. He cites the behavioural economist Dan Ariely's story about a locksmith. As a young apprentice, the tradesman used to take half an hour to mend a lock, at which point he'd be thanked wholeheartedly and given a tip. When he became more experienced, the locksmith could fix a similar problem in a minute. He charged the same rate and completed the job much faster. But instead of being pleased at his speed, customers complained about his rates and refused to tip him. "It's about our perception of value." And in this respect the skilled tradesman will often struggle, he says. In the course of researching his book The Pleasures and Sorrows of Work, Alain de Botton concludes that we all want to make a difference in our job, however banal that change may be. "At the end of the working day we want to feel we've left the planet slightly healthier, tidier, saner than it was at the beginning," he says. "I'm not necessarily talking of huge changes - the difference might merely involve sanding a stair banister, removing the squeak on a door or reuniting someone with their lost luggage." And yet, it is a mistake to romanticise working with your hands, he warns. "At heart, what you're talking about is the charm of craft work. And it's my sense this can happen in places far removed from the workshop. If you're writing computer code you are in a sense displaying many of the same skills as a craftsperson, even if the finished product can't be held or touched." But following the financial crisis, Mr de Botton says attitudes to all types of work may be changing. He detects a move away from the middle-class idea that work lies "at the heart of our self-fulfillment", to the working-class view of employment as a means of feeding yourself and your family. So maybe job satisfaction is slipping down the list of what is important when it comes to work.

Posted by Kiteman 7 years ago