99-second Cheese Crisps

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Introduction: 99-second Cheese Crisps

Ah, cheese. Whether you're an amateur admirer or a bona fide connoisseur, you may be aware of a delightful crunchy snack consisting of 100% cheese. These low-carb treats go by different brand names (such as Moon Cheese and Whisps), but the one thing they share is their price tag: these tiny bags typically sell for $3.50 to $5.00, or even higher. For less than 2 ounces of product, it can be an expensive indulgence.

Enter the homemade cheese crisp, made from humble sliced cheese. An 8 ounce package is usually around $2.00, so you can make 8 to 12 large crisps depending on the package count.

Let's begin!

Step 1: Gather Your Supplies

INGREDIENTS

- Sliced cheese

Acceptable forms of cheese include, but are not limited to: Cheddar, Colby Jack, Pepper Jack, Provolone Jack

Unacceptable forms of cheese: Cottage, Cream, Nacho, String

INSTRUMENTS + EQUIPMENT

- Cutting Board

- Microwave

- Parchment Paper

- Picnic Basket (optional)

Step 2: Preparation

Cut, if you're feeling fancy, or tear, if you're not, one piece of parchment paper large enough to accommodate two slices of cheese, approximately 10" x 6". It's ok to be imprecise as long as two slices will fit with a one-inch border around the perimeter.

If the paper misbehaves by rolling up like an ancient sea scroll, just flip it to the reverse side. The cheese will also help weigh it down.

Step 3: Assembly

Remove two slices of cheese from the package of your choice.

Assemble cheese slices on the parchment paper, leaving at least an inch between the two slices; they will spread as they cook.

Tip: Remember to remove the pesky little cheese separator square, if applicable.

Step 4: Cookery

Carefully transport your loaded parchment to the microwave.

Set the timer for 99 seconds.

Spend the next minute and a half contemplating a world without cheese...

Tip: For extra flavor, now is the time to add a sprinkle of spices, if you please. Garlic powder and smoked paprika work well, but let your imagination guide you.

Step 5: Cooling

Remove the parchment paper from the microwave as soon as it beeps. It helps to shimmy the parchment onto a plate or cutting board, pizza peel-style.

The cheese will be very hot and/or sizzling, so allow it to cool for at least a minute before eating.

Cheese will harden as it cools.

Step 6: Enjoy!

If all went well, your cheese slices should have progressed from limp to molten to crispy.

These crisps can be crumbled onto a salad, dipped into soups or eaten as giant crackers. I've gone so far as to use them as the "bread" in a sausage and egg sandwich, but that's an Instructable for another time...

Step 7: Field Notes

- Do not, under any circumstances, substitute wax paper for the parchment. Trust me on this.

- Do not use Velveeta or anything labeled "cheese food product". Keep it au naturale.

- While it's possible to reuse the cut parchment for a second batch, it won't produce the best results. Since the excess cheese oil may interfere with the paper's absorbability, I highly recommend using a fresh piece of parchment every time.

- As microwave settings may vary, you may very well need to adjust the time to get the perfect crunch. Goldilocks Rules apply: if the crisps turn out too chewy, add more time; if they are too hard, decrease time. With a little experimentation they will turn out just right!

- I assume the cheese crisps can be stored and kept at room temperature for a day or two, but let's be honest: there won't likely be any leftovers!

Cheese Speed Challenge

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48 Comments

1
laravich
laravich

4 weeks ago

Please forgive my ignorance, but I've never heard of parchment paper. Can you get it at Hobby Lobby or Michael's or-? These look fantastic, can't wait to try them!

1
carbonunit6
carbonunit6

Reply 4 weeks ago

No, parchment paper is found at any local food store or super-market store carries them right next to foil wrap, wax paper and plastic wrap! It's a very common item used in baking and so much more and the sheets can be re-used several times by washing and keeping it in the freezer until next time.

1
laravich
laravich

Reply 4 weeks ago

Okay, thank you! I guess that gives you an indication of how much cooking I do (zero).

0
shalnachywyt
shalnachywyt

Reply 4 weeks ago

You can reuse parchment paper? Didn't know that! Thanks for the info.

1
carbonunit6
carbonunit6

Reply 4 weeks ago

Yes! You can definitely reuse parchment paper! Most people don't know it and it's not displayed for obvious reasons that they want you to ditch it and keep buying more!

Parchment paper is a cellulose based paper that is very durable, so durable that after lining a 1/2 sheet pan and roasting chicken wings and veggies, when you're done, simply wipe off the excess grease with a kitchen napkin, and then lay it flat in the sink and wash the paper in the sink with "extra" dish liquid and a soft brush, but be gentle!

Wash both sides laying flat in the sink, after rinsing just pick it up and let the water drip off, and then fold the paper while it's wet and ---> ALWAYS STORE IN THE FREEZER BECAUSE OF RESIDUE FATS.

When you're ready to go next time, just use it as usual and be aware that as you use the paper, the edges will start to darken and get brittle from the high oven heat, just simply trim the edges with scissors and carry on!

As a chef, I've been reusing my same sheets for over 5 times from the freezer, so yes, DEFINITELY reuse it! It's a "quiet" old secret never told being used in the food industry like restaurants! Hope that helps. :)

1
shalnachywyt
shalnachywyt

Reply 4 weeks ago

Thank you! To get rid of fats/grease on my pans etc. I always pour a small layer of baking soda on there and then drizzle some water to form a paste. Let the paste sit for a five minutes, then wipe off the item and wash as usual. Grease/fat is an acid, and baking soda is a base, so they cancel each other out. I've used this on very-hard-to-get-clean items that have grease/fat baked on and it works like a charm!

1
carbonunit6
carbonunit6

Reply 4 weeks ago

Yes, you're absolutley correct! And Baking Soda being Alkaline, it definitely has 100's of uses and of course clean-up of fats, oils and grease!

For an optional short-cut with parchment paper clean-up using napkips, I just easily wipe-off any fats from the paper especially all the burnt bits, fold and in the freezer it goes!

When it comes to re-using the paper from the freezer, it'll then be partially 'seasoned' so-to-speak and perfectly fine for service, but of course for thorough cleaunup, you'd need to take extra steps.

For pizzas, I have cut-out 'paper circles' kept in the freezer that I literally re-use numerous amounts of times and the paper is just fine and still very intact. Just open the hot oven, bake the pizza on and then off the stone, remove the paper, fold it and store! Done.

Great way to keep the stone cleaner from getting hard-stuck baked-on cheeses, and parchment paper is such a great addition to everything baking, roasting or even lining a fry pan for quick saute helping to keep the pan clean, the lazy way! lol

0
iolite79
iolite79

Reply 4 weeks ago

Thanks for helping out the other commenter, and for all your great advice about the re-purposing of parchment paper! I admit, I usually throw out the parchment after a single use because of the excess oil on the surface, assuming that it absorbed too much to be of any further use. I will certainly try out your cleansing and reusing method.

I'm totally on-board with using parchment to bake pizza on top of a pizza stone. My boyfriend and I got into pizza making this last year, complete with from-scratch dough and homemade sauce. The only hard part was trying to transfer our masterpiece onto the stone from the parchment on which we prepared it. We considered buying a pizza peel for the job, but on a whim decided to try keeping the pizza on the parchment. It's definitely a two-person operation to transport from the counter to the hot stone on the rack, but it bakes beautifully and even gets those much sought-after leopard-spots on the bottom. At first, half-way through baking, one of us would grasp the pizza crust with tongs while the other would quickly yank out the parchment like a magician with a tablecloth. This was both fun and slightly dangerous, so eventually we just kept the parchment in for the entire duration. The results are perfect every time! I'm curious, do you use a peel with your parchment circles, or are they large enough to hold the edges and transfer to the stone in a similar way?

0
carbonunit6
carbonunit6

Reply 4 weeks ago

As mentioned earlier, you're wasting valuable money by throwing out parchment paper after just one use, bad practice and this is a selling gimmick that everyone has fallen for, sad!

Make sure to always cut your parchment paper at least one inch larger than the pizzas you're making. I have two very well USED round pizza paper sheets prepped and ready to go from the freezer at all times along with very well used half-sheet pan and quarter-sheet pan parchment papers in the freezer, ready to go for sheet-pan meals, chicken wings, roasted vegetables...etc!

And this is not at all a '2-man operation'....nor should it ever be! Just buy a good pizza peel and when you're pressing out the raw pizza dough without any toppings to the size you want, you then have two options once the pizza dough is pressed (and never ever rolled) out flat, now let the pizza dough rest for 5 minutes.

Next, you can either slide the dough onto the (used) dry cutout paper, or for extra taste and crunch, oil the top side of the parchment paper and then side the raw empty flat pizza dougn on to that paper and proceed building your pizza on the oiled paper which also helps to prevent it from sliding too much on the oiled paper!

Always preheat your oven to MAXIMUM tempurature, now go ahead and build your pizza on the paper and once you're done, pinch the edge of the paper and slide the whole pizza onto the peel and bake.

When the pizza is done, open the door, place the front EDGE of the peel on the oven baking rack, pinch the parchment paper and SLOWLY slide the whole pizza onto the peel, paper and pizza together! Take CAUTION here because the pizza bottom will be baked dry and the pizza will very easily side off the paper!

Now, the trick to CRUNCHY bottoms is vast, but one trick that's very important to prevent soggy bottoms is this: As soon as the pizza is out of the oven and slid on the peel, paper and all.....have a cooling rack set on the counter and immediately slide ONLY the pizza minus the paper onto the cooling rack....and why? Because if you rest the hot pizza dough on a plate, then condensation will form and sog-out the baked dough defeating the crunch!

By sliding only the pizza onto the cooling rack, the heat will escape away from the bottom of the pizza preventing condensation! Just let the hot pizza rest for a few minutes to 'cool off' the bottom while you're pouring your wine or cracking open a few beers! After a few minutes wait, now just slide the pizza onto a cutting board, slice up and enjoy....that's it!

Of course this is only one trick to making very good pizza in a conventional oven, but here's a 2nd trick! You can either buy this "Lodge Cast Iron Pizza Pan 15-inch" new style edgeless pan here:
https://www.lodgecastiron.com/product/seasoned-cast-iron-pizza-pan?sku=BW15PP

Or as I much more prefer, buy this conventional edged "Lodge Cast Iron Pizza Pan 14-inch" that has a small edge on it making it possible to roast foods that liqiuds will stay contained as compared to the new Lodge Pan that does not have an edge! Just somting to think about!
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Lodge-Cast-Iron-Pizza-...

Now when preheating your oven, set your Lodge Cast Iron Pan on the TOP RACK of the oven and turn on the oven to BROIL which will really get that Lodge pan super hot.....and I mean HOT.

When all is ready to go....these next steps must be done very quickly:
(1) Open the oven door
(2) Slide the pizza WITH the parchment paper off the peel and on to the Lodge Cast Iron Pan.
(3) Close the door and IMMEDIATELY set the burner from BROIL to BAKE

If your oven has a glass door, turn on the oven light and you will see the bottom edge of your pizza roasting....that's exactly what youy want.....and this can only happen on condition of these important steps:
(1) Super hot oven.
(2) Use a heavy Lodge Cast Iron Pizza Pan on the top baking rack.
(3) Only open the door ONCE very quickly to turn the pizza 180 for even baking.
(4) Cool the bottom of the pizza crust on a cooling rack for a few minutes

......and ENJOY!

Edgeless style pan.........Conventional edged pan............Options!

New Style 15-in Edgeless Lodge Pan.JPGConventional 14-in Edged Lodge Style Pan.JPGEdged Roasting Pan.JPG
0
shalnachywyt
shalnachywyt

Reply 4 weeks ago

Thank you! Appreciate the extra info which I was not aware of.

0
iolite79
iolite79

Reply 4 weeks ago

Oh yes, that's a great way to clean a number of surfaces without the use of harsh chemicals. It works just as well for cleaning counter tops, tubs and sinks without too much elbow-grease involved. :-)

1
carbonunit6
carbonunit6

Reply 4 weeks ago

Hahaa.....yes, that's understood! Luckily for me, as an artist, musician, mechanic, fly-fishermen and so much more and of course, a hobby chef! We all have to eat and truthfully speaking, I have not eaten in a restaurant for so many years, I've lost count....and for a reason, because I LOVE to cook at home or outdoors and the meals I do cook well, you would have to go to very high class and very expensive restaurants to enjoy the kind of foods I prep and make and it would surely cost a small mortgage if someone wanted to eat the kind of meals I make if you ate out in restaurants everyday! lol

1
Superfoot
Superfoot

Reply 4 weeks ago

Commonly known as Baking paper in Australia

0
iolite79
iolite79

Reply 4 weeks ago

Thank you for the compliment, and please forgive me for not mentioning where to find parchment paper in my 'ible! I didn't realize it went by other names in different regions, but thankfully the other commenters stepped in to help. I hope you were able to find some so you can try these. :-)

1
DesignerUserName
DesignerUserName

Reply 4 weeks ago

Any hobby store that has a baking aisle will most likely have parchment paper. The major difference being price. It's not the most affordable product depending on where you buy, but is a total necessity -- at least in my kitchen! :)

0
iolite79
iolite79

Reply 4 weeks ago

Thanks, I hope you'll try them.

1
folkhero
folkhero

4 weeks ago

Superb. I can hardly wait to try this.

0
iolite79
iolite79

Reply 4 weeks ago

Why, thank you. Enjoy!

1
rreifsneider
rreifsneider

4 weeks ago

Just made some with shredded parmesan. They were awesome. I had just bought a bag of crisps at a warehouse club to use as dog treats, and they cost a fortune, so I had bought some shredded parm to figure out how to make my own. Very quick method that does not heat up the house like the oven. Only needed 60 seconds for a couple of big ones for my wife and I to try.