ADAPTIVE SEAT FIXTURE FOR KAYAKING

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Introduction: ADAPTIVE SEAT FIXTURE FOR KAYAKING


This is my NEWEST Seat Design that plugs right into a stock Malibu Two!

This design will work perectly on both models of the Ocean Kayak, Inc. Malibu Two - original and XL, and can be modified to fit a wide variety of other models. The requisite is that there are scupper holes near the back of the seat pan area for the seat fixture to rest in.

This seat adaption is designed to provide the upper trunk support that, for instance, an incomplete quad, would need to keep his or her body centered over the kayak, thereby greatly reducing the possibility of a capsize. Paddlers with many levels of physical ability have found great comfort in using this design. You will see it being utilized in many of the photos on my web site.

Step 1: ADAPTIVE KAYAKING SEAT FIXTURE - PARTS LIST

ADAPTIVE SEAT FIXTURE (LATEST DESIGN) - PARTS LIST

3/4" PVC PIPE PIECES:

A  2 EA     6.0 CM
B  2 EA     5.5 CM
C  2 EA    15.0 CM
D  2 EA    12.0 CM
E  2 EA    16.0 CM
F  2 EA     23.0 CM
G  2 EA     9.0 CM
H  2 EA     9.0 CM
I   2 EA      6.0 CM
J  1 EA    44.0 CM
K  1 EA    40.0 CM

Referring to the first photo attached to this step...
These latest dimensions remove the gap at B and lower the height 1 inch.
H will appear ~3/4 inch longer than shown to compensate for shorter B and E.

PIPE FITTINGS:

4 EA   90 Degree Elbows
6 EA   45 Degree Elbows
6 EA   T Fittings
2 EA   Couplers - Use the long ones if you can find them!

Step 2: ADAPTIVE SEAT FIXTURE - INSTRUCTIONS

INSTRUCTIONS

Cut all the pieces according to the Parts List in Step 1, ensuring the longest measurable length of each piece matches the dimensions given in the list.

Be sure to use a Primer on the joints just before applying the Glue and pushing the pieces together.

Build each of the sections of this design as shown in the second photo attached.

Pipe pieces K, C, and particularly J can be wrapped with a section of Hot Water Line Insulator as shown for J in the second photo.

Piece J is a critical part of the design. It effectively deepens the seat pocket to keep the paddler from slipping forward and out of the pocket.

Step 3: ADAPTIVE SEAT FIXTURE - NOTES


NOTES:

--- It's easiest to make the groups as shown below first, then fit them together.

--- J is 4CM longer than K to spread the upper supports.

--- J is wrapped with closed-cell foam hot-water-pipe insulation for padding.

--- The lengths of E, H, and I are critical to properly position J.

--- B, C, and D are joined by 45 degree Elbows.

--- H and I are joined by a 45 degree Elbow.

--- The fixture is held in place by the seat, and by the paddler's legs over piece J.

--- This design uses 2 fewer fitting pieces than my original design
     and can be made with one 10-foot length of 3/4" Schedule 40 PVC pipe.

--- Pieces A can be lengthened for more of a reclining position.

--- Pieces F and D can be adjusted equally to accommodate paddler height.

--- DO NOT CHANGE the length of pieces E, H, and I, for use on a Malibu Two!

--- Padding on C and the paddler's PFD make for a nice snug fit in the fixture.

Step 4: USING THE ADAPTIVE KAYAKING SEAT FIXTURE

The Adaptive Seat Fixture is placed in the center seat postion of the kayak, guiding the rear vertical pieces into the scupper holes at the rear edge of the seat pan.

The Seat Adaption could be used without the addition of the seat-back as shown in the photos (black) below. The paddler's PFD (assuming it's a good Paddler's Jacket) would provide for the padding needed to make use of it, and the paddlers legs would mostly hold the fixture in place.

Still, a much improved setup is created by adding a nice seat-back, such as the Surf-To-Summit model shown in the photos. Use a bungee cord to hold the back of the seat-back firmly into the fixture as shown in the first photo. Then, connect the forward straps of the seat-back to the factory installed eyelets provided for that purpose and cinch them up. When properly fitted, the seat-back and seat fixture will feel very tightly bound to the kayak with very little play in any direction.

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    9 Discussions

    0
    mudfish
    mudfish

    1 day ago

    Great to see a post on a Malibu Two. A lot of discussion on other boats to be had but the Malibu Two is the one I've had for many years. Avoiding a wet butt is a good thing! This seat mod may be the best one I've seen! I'm thinking about some removable outriggers for standup fishing/bow fishing also. Great job!

    0
    kayakdiver
    kayakdiver

    Reply 7 hours ago

    Thanks! I have received correspondence indicating it is being reproduced and used successfully all around the world. Check out my Powered Sip&Puff design for an idea on adding the pontoons, and note that my pontoons are about 3X bulkier than they actually need to be. http://www.DisabledAdventurers.com/PoweredKayak.html

    0
    joecurecmd
    joecurecmd

    Question 6 weeks ago on Step 4

    Hi there,
    I see you have the directions on how to build an adaptive seat fixture for the kayak but can I pay you to make one? Thanks for considering.
    Sincerely,
    Joe Pinkelman

    0
    kayakdiver
    kayakdiver

    Answer 6 weeks ago

    My published design is custom suited to the Ocean Kayak Malibu Two, making important use of the rear scupper holes as well as factory installed eyelets perfectly placed for this design. Any other kayak would likely necessitate alterations to the design and possibly to the kayak itself, such as adding eyelets, either way requiring access to the particular model.

    Two main considerations achieved with my design are 1: keeping the paddler's bottom from slipping forward and the paddler sitting mostly upright, accomplished by the padded bar in front of the seat pocket, and 2: keeping the paddler centered in the kayak so they don't lean so far as to capsize, accomplished by the side supports which A: should allow just enough room for the PFD, and B: should not interfere with the paddling efforts, in other words, snug and just high enough. The seat should not trap the paddler in case they do find a way to capsize.

    I have not endeavored to commercialize any of my designs or to make them to sell. I make the designs freely available to the public to use as they wish. I don't even care if someone else makes them and sells them; it would just mean more of them out there helping those who need them most. With that said, if it is possible for me to conceive a workable design for your particular kayak I would be happy to help however I can.

    I'd be happy to consult with you further on this. You can contact me through my website: DisabledAdventurers.com.

    0
    352barbie1964
    352barbie1964

    2 years ago

    Wow , great instructable! I'm really interested in your paddle set up. Can it be used one handed? I had a surgery couple yrs ago , lost the use of my left hand. Is there an instructable for paddle setup? thx

    0
    kayakdiver
    kayakdiver

    Reply 2 years ago

    Yes, it was specifically designed for people with paraplegia or other challenges that limit use of one or both hands.

    You can find detailed information on my website, which is strictly non-commercial: DisabledAdventurers dot com.

    0
    kayakdiver
    kayakdiver

    8 years ago on Step 3

    I'll add a few late notes here as a comment:

    After assembling the fixture, use first a rough file then smoother file to remove any burrs or pointy features sometimes found on the PVC Joint pieces. It is very important to not cause any type of abrasive injuries to your paddlers!

    And finally, this fixture looks greeat if you spray paint it with fast drying (Krylon) paint. I like to use various colors of "hammered metal" paint to make it hard to tell it is made out of PVC pipe.

    0
    Becky Jane
    Becky Jane

    9 years ago on Introduction

    This looks like something my blog readers might enjoy knowing about. I would like to post your Instructable on my blog at: http://wheelchairdecor.blogspot.com/

    Let me know what you think, Becky Jane

    0
    kayakdiver
    kayakdiver

    Reply 9 years ago on Introduction

    A B S O L U T E L Y ! ! !

    Please feel free to use ANY of the content in my web site: www.DisabledAdventurers.com as well.

    Your BLOG page looks great, and the cute little figurines look like you!
    Have fun!