Adjustable Gripping Hitch

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Introduction: Adjustable Gripping Hitch

I came across this effective griping hitch several years ago.

I don't know if it has a name.

When the standing end is held and the loop is pulled the knot locks tightly in place

If you hold the knot it can be slid along the standing end.

I use to adjust tension in guy lines, clothes lines and tarpaulin tie downs

Step 1:

Wrap the working end WE around the standing end.

Bight one.

Step 2:

Go around a second time.

Bight two.

Step 3:

And a third.

Bight three.

Step 4:

Bring WE over, under.

Step 5:

Bring WE through bights one and two.

The knot is complete

Step 6:

Tighten.

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    26 Comments

    0
    asemery
    asemery

    Reply 10 months ago

    It serves the same function as the tautline hitch

    0
    ecardinal
    ecardinal

    10 months ago

    Very nice, I'll give this a try. I don't remember seeing this particular knot in Ashley's - and I've been through it many times (though I may be wrong).

    0
    asemery
    asemery

    Reply 10 months ago

    It is very much like the Blake's Hitch (mirror image), an Arborist's hitch, which came after Ashley.

    0
    RobertM201
    RobertM201

    10 months ago

    Great and interesting knot. It is one loop shy of a blake's hitch as used by arborists. And unlike a tension hitch, you are taking the working end back through the wraps created by going around the static line rather than going around the static line in the opposite direction.

    But it looks effective for the use you describe. Going to try it out.

    0
    asemery
    asemery

    Reply 10 months ago

    You are correct.. It is mirror image of the Blake's hitch

    0
    Ben Gilson
    Ben Gilson

    Tip 10 months ago on Introduction

    I love the variations of the knot I always use for tent staking, learned in the Boy Scouts. Another fixed loop knot, I think called the Tuckers knot, I now use routinely in the last 50 years is one where you tie a doubled overhand knot to give a fixed loop at the end, wrap criss-cross a package, pull tight, and then tie with a double half hitch through the loop. Easy to tie, holds tight, and easy to untie.

    0
    huffmanld1
    huffmanld1

    10 months ago

    It looks very much like a Blake's hitch, used by arborists climbing up a rope, except the Blake's hitch takes FOUR turns, with the line coming back out between two and three. The standing part attaches to the climbing harness and thus goes back down the climbing line, instead of coming out at 90 degrees as in a loop. It tightens in tension (IF you've set it up solid beforehand) and slips when one grips the knot and thus straightens it a bit. Thus, you can slide down the climbing line in control without loosening the harness line, which is the case if one uses a rolling hitch. (A rolling hitch is a clove hitch with an extra turn, which is on the load end of the knot. It's also good for tightening tent lines, etc.)

    0
    argononeya2
    argononeya2

    10 months ago on Step 6

    I believe the knot you made does have a name .It has a few names .I may be wrong.I think the knot today is called a "taught line hitch " or a monkey fist.Tree climbers ,or tree trimmers use this knot to move safely around the limbs while still being "tied in " This knot allows them to unclip the waist safety line and still be safely tied in ,and can move around the tree while NEVER being disconnected from a safety line .

    0
    wallace.mcclure
    wallace.mcclure

    10 months ago

    That looks like the taut-line hitch taught to Boy Scouts, and used on things like tent guy lines and others. Learned it in Boy Scouting like 40+ years ago. And I'm still using it when I need that functionality in a knot.

    0
    Wild-Bill
    Wild-Bill

    10 months ago

    I have use a knot with a similar function. I use it for tying tent guy lines. The only difference I see is that the knot I use doesn't have to be set so that it does not slide on a guy line.

    2021-01-14-094233.jpg2021-01-14-094710.jpg2021-01-14-094835.jpg
    0
    RandyPerson
    RandyPerson

    10 months ago

    Interesting knot. As others have already pointed out, it appears to be similar in use as the taut line hitch. One advantage to the taut line is that it can be easily tied to a line under tension, as is often the case with tent and tarp guys. This knot kind of looks like a form of prussik tied around the standing end. When I saw the description of "gripping hitch," I first thought maybe the loop would close around something, like a bundle of sticks, and hold it tightly. It appears now that the term refers to the "gripping" of the standing line, similar to the taut line hitch. Is this correct? If so, it might be helpful to have at least one photo of the knot under use, showing it gripping a tight line holding tension on something.

    0
    gsmittle
    gsmittle

    10 months ago on Step 6

    Looks like a variation of a tension hitch.

    0
    Miltonable
    Miltonable

    11 months ago

    This looks very much like the “Fisherman’s knot” I was taught to use to tie a hook or lure to my line, although I aim for 5 wraps around the standing end...

    0
    popsb48
    popsb48

    Reply 10 months ago

    It's called a taut line hitch - commonly used on tent peg or pole lines as it's easy to adjust tightness

    0
    davidqxo
    davidqxo

    10 months ago

    Thank you for this. Suggestion: the opening and closing photos (identical, I think) would be easier to understand if the free end of the Working End was visible.

    0
    Sawadeee
    Sawadeee

    10 months ago

    Love knots
    This one is new to me.
    Thanks