Automatic Bicycle Pump

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Introduction: Automatic Bicycle Pump

Fill your bicycle wheels with conveniently available pressurized air stored in automobiles.

Step 1: Materials

You need a 50cm-100cm long air hose and two chucks. Make sure the hose fits very tightly on the chucks.

Step 2: Assembly

Push the hose onto the chucks. It should be a very tight fit. If it is too tight you can soften the hose by heating it in warm water.

Step 3: Steal Some Air!

Take your bike and go find a hummer (or some other overweight vehicle). Fold the hose in your hand so you don't waste any precious energy. Attach one end to the automobile tyre and the other to your bike. When you unfold the hose you can hear a hiss. That is the sound of air flowing to your bike wheel and the world becoming a better place :) Fold the hose again before you detach it from both vehicles.

Remember! Thou shalt not steal air from public transportation. Public transportation is good.

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    188 Comments

    0
    thedahlpod
    thedahlpod

    16 years ago on Step 3

    hell yeah! I'm lovin' this. So simple. I can't believe I didn't think of this or seen this before.

    0
    patrickcleary
    patrickcleary

    Reply 11 years ago on Step 3

    Yes, except for the fact that this doesn't work!

    As many have said in this comment section, this will only further deflate your tires, or inflate them to a low point. Believe it or not, bicycle tires require a higher pressure than do car and even truck tires.
    Someone made a remark about it being "common sense" that an automobile have a higher tire pressure, but this is solely based on assumption. And we all know what happens when you assume...

    It's a great concept, but there's no way to practically apply this. The pressure source being suggested in this Instructable is simply inadequate.

    0
    lasersage
    lasersage

    Reply 11 years ago on Introduction

    that kind of depends on the bike too. On the whole I agree with what you're saying but you've over generalized bikes. OK some racing bikes use over 100psi but the majority of mountain bikes are happy in the 40psi range. I knew a guy who had a massive downhill bike with 3" wide tyres and he ran his at about 12psi.
    Stealing air isn't good though. I'd be pretty annoyed if someone did it to me. Not everyone checks their tyres as often as they should.

    0
    PaulMakesThings
    PaulMakesThings

    Reply 11 years ago on Introduction

    most cars are 25 to 35 psi, so the low range of bike tires being 40 psi doesn't really help the case. Also on the big suvs (which he is probably targeting to be green) the tires being low greatly increases wear and adds to the chance of a blowout or a rollover. At any rate it can lower the life of the tire, which is not eco-friendly to replace. I can't imagine why someone would do this instead of getting a little portable pump, bike tires are low volume and topping them off doesn't take long.

    0
    joewickedsmith
    joewickedsmith

    Reply 1 year ago

    SUVs that run a light wheeled truck or "LT" tire with recommendations up to 95psi I've personally seen run as high 80psi like on my Ford Expedition. Plus the sheer volume of the larger tire wouldn't suffer much loss. It would be barely noticable to those who are not Zen with their rides.BUT it would cost more fuel for the gas guzzling SUV to compensate for the sluggish dragging tire than it would for more fuel efficient vehicles. All engines would require an increase in fuel consumption by a comparable percentage of their normal fuel usage. so the higher the normal consumption, the higher the actual volume of fuel burned. It is just not "green" to go after the gas guzzlers

    0
    lasersage
    lasersage

    Reply 11 years ago on Introduction

    OK for the sake of a few psi I'm finding this all a little pedantic now. Yes I said 40psi, and yes I'm aware that car's tend to be lower than that. The point I was trying to make was that so many people in these comments are talking about bike tyres being over 100psi and they're generally not. 40psi is plenty. OK so you can only steal 30psi from a car (which I still don't approve of) and you're not gonna want to ram a curb and get a pinch flat, but it'll get you home won't it?

    0
    PaulMakesThings
    PaulMakesThings

    Reply 11 years ago on Introduction

    The small change in PSI probably won't matter, but for the cost of these parts you could just get a small hand pump that clips to your frame and inflate your tires without being annoying.

    0
    wmlaveck
    wmlaveck

    Reply 9 years ago on Introduction

    I agree, my bike tires (27") require 100 lb of pressure.

    0
    Dunhausen
    Dunhausen

    Reply 11 years ago on Introduction

    What you can do is pile weight on the car first thus increasing the pressure. Just looking at my jeep it has, say, at least 80 in^2 of tire in contact with the ground. Of course, the tires will flatten out even more as you add weight and/or suck out air, but let's say to get from 40 psi to 110psi you only need to pile 5,600 pounds on top of the vehicle for an adequate pressure increase. So with a good supply of bricks and rocks you should be in business.

    0
    RubberRetropack
    RubberRetropack

    Reply 11 years ago on Introduction

    Brilliant! So instead of carrying around a small hand pump on my bicycle, I'll carry around this air-stealing device, and a mere 5600lbs of bricks! It's fool-proof!

    0
    espdp2
    espdp2

    Reply 11 years ago on Introduction

    Maybe that's why some &%$# piled a bunch of rocks on my Suburban! I was wondering, until I read this 'ible.

    0
    finnrambo
    finnrambo

    Reply 11 years ago on Introduction

    what about the volume of a car tire vs. a bike tire and the weight of the car increasing the pressure?

    0
    RubberRetropack
    RubberRetropack

    Reply 11 years ago on Introduction

    The only way that the weight of the car could increase the pressure is if the tires were inflated before they are installed onto the car. Since car tires are inflated after they are installed on the car, the 35psi that is standard for car tires has *already* taken into account the extra weight of the car compared to the bicycle. 35psi is all it has, tops, and you cannot use a 35psi car tire to inflate a bike tire to anything approaching it's recommended pressure.

    This kind of idea is only useful in an emergency stopgap kind of situation. Like, you're out riding, you get a flat, you don't have a real pump on you, so patch your tire and then you use this trick to get your tire up to 35psi, and then you immediately ride straight home to where you have a real pump to get your tire up to the proper 60-120psi that it likely requires (depending on what type of tire it is).

    This is not the kind of thing where you say "oh, my tire's a little low, I'm gonna go fill it up from a car tire." doesn't work.

    0
    Alex62592
    Alex62592

    Reply 11 years ago on Introduction

    your right i thought of that to because a common car tire is about 35psi my bike tire takes up to 60 psi thats double so this wouldn't work. i agree with you 100%

    0
    terrafire
    terrafire

    Reply 11 years ago on Introduction

    However, if you're a dirt jump or street rider, the average pressure (35psi) for car tires is more than adequate for your tires. Making this, a worthwhile mod. But in a way, you are correct, in that most road tires do require upwards of 90 psi. Don't like it? Buy a mousse or a tubular tire.

    0
    pitajames
    pitajames

    Reply 11 years ago on Introduction

    I agree with you about the pressure differnce inside the tyre, however have you thought about the weight of the vehicle and how much additional pressure that would apply? Would be interesting to see if this does work considering the weight difference. Perhaps it can work ?

    0
    tipaklong
    tipaklong

    Reply 11 years ago on Introduction

    pressure is the amount of force acting on a surface area. when a pressure reading is taken on a loaded tire, it has already taken into account all the weight the is being carried by the tire. fluid pressure (air) will always flow from high to low so they would equalize.

    0
    infared067
    infared067

    Reply 11 years ago on Introduction

    It still would work, but would only be practical for emergency situations.

    For example if you changed a flat but didn't have a way to fill it up. If your bike tire is rated up to 80 psi, but car tires only carry up to 30 psi on average, that 30 psi will be more than enough to get you home or to another source of air.

    However if your tire was just low, say 50psi and you wanted to pump it to 80psi. By plugging it into a car tire at 30psi, would deflate your bike tire until it reached an equilibrium just over 30psi, depending on the volume of both tires.

    0
    malood
    malood

    Reply 11 years ago on Step 3

    buses used for public transportation do have tires with PSI around 80-90. They would be great for filling up bike's tire