Better No-Cost Crampons

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Introduction: Better No-Cost Crampons

About: I've been tinkering and building things since I was very young. The hobby continues on!

As winter rolled around, I got tired of slipping on icy pavement while getting to and from classes. I looked at purchasing a pair of inexpensive crampons, but the product reviews for most of them complained of the rubber pieces snapping. The nicer ones used spikes instead of chains, and I wanted something more low-profile.

Essentially, I wanted crampons that were:

  1. Inexpensive to make
  2. low profile and without spikes, so that if I accidentally walked inside with them they would not scratch the floor
  3. Easy and quick to slip on and off so that I could effectively use them to get to and from class without being late because I had to put on crampons.

So, I set out to make my own to meet my needs. I looked at a few instructables (and even attempted to make a few a while back, those weren't my best instructables) and came up with an even better design that combines these two instructables:

https://www.instructables.com/id/Backpack-Cargo-Ne...

https://www.instructables.com/id/No-Cost-Crampons/

The finished crampons cost me nothing to make, and work great!

Step 1: Materials

You'll need:

  • Old bike inner tube. I used a 26x1.95, but another size will do. You can often get old popped ones by asking nicely at bike shops.
  • Scissors
  • Nuts. You'll need about 20, and preferably they should be all the same size.

Step 2: Cut the Inner Tube Into Bands

Use your scissors to cut the tube into thin bands. Keep in mind that the bands must be thin enough to be threaded through your nuts. Don't cut the whole tube up though; you'll want to save some to cut into long strips for a later step.

Step 3: Start Weaving!

I won't explain how to weave the inner tube, but here's the instructable where I learned it from:

https://www.instructables.com/id/Backpack-Cargo-Ne...

the natural pattern of this weave is benzene-like hexagons, but you can make it into pentagons or squares, all depending on the shape of your foot. From time to time, put what you've woven so far on the sole of the shoe to see where you need to add more. Thread on the nuts where you want them. I put most up on the toes, and three on the heel.

You'll want the loose ends of the bands to hang no more than about halfway over the edge of the sole; this will allow them to stretch over the top of your shoe, keeping them in place.

Step 4: Loop Around the Net

Once you have your footprint all woven, cut a long strip of the inner tube, and loop it through all the loose ends of the bands. Then tie it off in a regular square knot. You'll want to be tight so that the whole thing "curls" up a bit, so that when you stretch it over your shoe it will be tight enough to hug the perimeter of your shoe.

Step 5: (Optional) Tie a Strap Across the Top

If you want, you can tie a strap over the top of the shoe. This will make the crampons stay on better, but will make them harder to put on.

Step 6: One Down, One to Go...

Now you're done with one of the crampons! Now just repeat the exact same thing for the other shoe.

Step 7: Done!

Now you have your own crampons for much cheaper, and arguably better quality, than if you had bought them from a store!

Disclaimer: These are not guaranteed to keep you from slipping on ice; but rather a preventative measure. I am not responsible for any injury from the use of this instructable.

2 People Made This Project!

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26 Comments

0
punyidea
punyidea

9 months ago

I made this following NeilRG's advice to use stainless steel nuts. They work great! I used A4 stainless steel nuts, euro size M8 but I think M6 could also work.

My inner tube is I suppose a bit smaller so I used 65 links for each shoe.

Thanks for posting this!

IMG_20210125_092432.jpg
0
NeilRG
NeilRG

1 year ago

This is CLEVER and well presented. I would recommend using stainless steel nuts, at a slight increase in cost from zero to about 5 bucks. The zinc plated nuts will lose their plating and start to rust due to inevitable sections of concrete and salt. The rust might track into floors or rugs. The stainless nuts are generally harder and could be reused if it becomes necessary to make replacements.

0
jeanniel1
jeanniel1

1 year ago

How awesome. I can see how reusing inner tubes would be good versus tossing them out. Thanks for recycling and reusing

0
dave.vaness.79
dave.vaness.79

2 years ago

When I lived in Northern Washington State, the logger would where these boots with spikes on the soles to grab on to the logs as the moved about. They were called calks but they were called corks by a lot of people. The businesses in the rural areas would have "No Corks" signs in their front windows. There has a medical condition called Darrington Measles. It was when you got kicked in the face, in a fight, by someone wearing corks!

0
FamilyF4
FamilyF4

Reply 1 year ago

My sister lived in a house in BC that had been "textured" by loggers in an earlier life.

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FamilyF4
FamilyF4

1 year ago

"Benzene-like" ! Ha ha! Sad that DC doesn't get cold enough to need these anymore...

0
ChrisA1
ChrisA1

Reply 1 year ago

In about 5000 years it will, provided you live twice as long as Mel Brooks (The 2,000 Year Old Man) :)

0
michelleg23
michelleg23

2 years ago on Step 7

Great idea! Definitely putting this to use!! Thanks!!!

0
CasseyShepherd
CasseyShepherd

2 years ago

As I lost one of my husbands YaxTrax while walking around our yard this winter, I will definitely be making these! Thanks so much!

0
amcgamcg
amcgamcg

Reply 2 years ago

As you omitted the apostrophe in "husbands" I at first thought you'd lost your husbands in the garden! Very clumsy lady, I thought, then I imagined you scraping around the garden, following the YakTrak prints of your husbands in the snow, probably in some American cult, where you can marry two men...? The mind boggles, then I realized you'd just lost one of your husband's crampons.

0
CasseyShepherd
CasseyShepherd

Reply 2 years ago

The power of apostrophe. Haha

0
amcgamcg
amcgamcg

2 years ago

So clever, using the tubes to make rings! That's lateral thinking for you!

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amcgamcg
amcgamcg

2 years ago on Step 7

Great instructable: I shall make a pair for my sister who lives in Bonnie Scotand (Sconnie Botland)!
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lfoss
lfoss

2 years ago on Step 7

"benzene-like hexagons".. spoken like a true chemist. LOL. Awesome instructable! Love the Nike shoes also!!

0
masterbuilder
masterbuilder

Reply 2 years ago

Thanks! They are Nike Gatos

0
ice monster
ice monster

2 years ago

Great idea! As an avid Michigan hiker I wear out at least 2 pairs of Yak Trax every winter. I will definitely copy your idea. Because the Yaks use springs for traction they pick up leaves when walking on snow-free stretches. The hex nuts probably won't do that.

0
masterbuilder
masterbuilder

Reply 2 years ago

I was actually thinking about getting myself a pair of yaktrax before thinking of the idea for these!

0
ubicity
ubicity

2 years ago

great!

0
jmdushi
jmdushi

2 years ago

They look very solid and easy to make. You can glue Velcro on the strap that will make them easier to put on.