Brick Wide Rocket Stove

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Introduction: Brick Wide Rocket Stove

About: There's always a better way, just keep recycling those brainwaves!

Extra wide rocket stove. I tried the smaller half brick chimney but needed a larger cooking area. Works better for me.

Step 1: Base Slab

my stove was set on a garden turf patch. I inset the slab by cutting a turf patch and ensured it was level.

Step 2: 1st Course of Bricks

i used 2 half bricks but you could use 2 whole on rear. Ensure snug fit around internal corners. I made grill out of corner plaster beading which i cut into 3 pieces and hammered flat for tray.

Step 3: 2nd Course

i used full bricks for the 2nd course.

Step 4: 3rd Course Onwards

full bricks for subsequent course ensuring snug fit around internal chimney. Alternate brick pattern interlace for each course.

Step 5: Top Stove Area

i used an old oven grill tray. for additional height offset i used ceramic tile spacers.

Step 6: Fire Her Up!

add wood above air grill . light up with paper or fire starters and burn until no smoke.

Step 7: Cook on It!

Chicken curry. Yumm.

Step 8: Rocket Oven

Heres my rocket powered oven. Its a big oven pot with aluminium trays.

Kebabs n Salmon tikka. Took about an hour in the oven . Yummy!

Step 9: Rocket Grill

Heres my rocket powered grill.
This cast iron grill cost £20 delivered from Andrew James.

This should keep direct smoke off the food. It has a flat and ribbed side. Ideal for burgers n bangers.

Have yet to try it. Will post pics when I do ☺

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15 Comments

0
ET-Aggie
ET-Aggie

5 weeks ago

Hi, did you use regular construction bricks, or are these fire bricks? And what is the slab material? Concrete?

0
solara70
solara70

Reply 17 days ago

Yes whatever bricks I had spare. However, they can crack if used slot, but easily swapped out. The stronger the better.
Slab was just a spare paving slab, nothing special. Just trying to recycle what I had available.

0
wildwildrice
wildwildrice

Question 17 days ago on Introduction

Could you tell me please what the slab and the finished stove measures?

0
solara70
solara70

Answer 17 days ago

It will depend upon the size of brick you use. These differ between countries. For the length of the stove across multiply the brick length by 2. Same for slab or larger.
For the stove width back, multiply by 1.5.

0
davidkemp21
davidkemp21

8 months ago on Introduction

I did a version of this after studying your post. Works well! I am a spelling nut... it is "course" not "coarse".

0
solara70
solara70

Reply 8 months ago

Of course! :-)
Corrected thanks!

0
karen_lee
karen_lee

Question 1 year ago on Step 5

If I counted correctly, it should be 35 bricks? Could it be taller, with the tray in a higher position?

0
solara70
solara70

Answer 1 year ago

bottom 2 layers are 4 bricks each.=8 bricks. each layer pon top is 5 bricks. you could make it higher, alll depends on how much heat you want to cook with and the wood. more layers means less direct heat.

0
karen_lee
karen_lee

Reply 1 year ago

Thank you, after looking at more closely, I see what you mean. The other question was if I made it higher, could I make the fire layer higher as well, for instance on put the screen on the 3rd layer?

0
solara70
solara70

Reply 1 year ago

yes you could, but i wouldnt take it tooo high as the structure becomes less stablle.

0
karen_lee
karen_lee

Reply 1 year ago

Thank you so much for answering

0
AchyutD
AchyutD

Question 2 years ago on Step 4

In step 4 how front bricks are staying where is the support? Plz help..

0
solara70
solara70

Answer 2 years ago

No support required, bricks will hold together by supporting each other Try it and you will see.

0
teresaq
teresaq

4 years ago

Too cool! Thanks!