Floating Table Top


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Introduction: Floating Table Top

I am an author and a maker. My current project is Santa's Shop. I'm working on a science fiction ty…

This looks impossible, sort of a table top held in the air by string. Actually, the weight of the upper structure places tension on the center string (attached to the pencil). The other three strings prevent the top from twisting or flipping--it's really not that hard to set up.

Research "tensegrity" for more information regarding this type of structure.

Supplies

Cardboard

Pencil

Glue

Tape

Fishing line (or string or thread)

Step 1:

These are the patterns for the cardboard pieces.

Step 2:

Cut six legs.

Step 3:

Glue three leg pieces together--twice.

Step 4:

Cut four body pieces.

Step 5:

Glue the four body pieces together.

Step 6:

Glue the legs to the body.

Step 7:

Cut six arms and poke holes in the top (to support a pencil).

Step 8:

Glue three arm pieces together, twice.

Step 9:

Glue the arms to the body assembly.

Step 10:

Cut two neck pieces.

Step 11:

Glue the center of the neck pieces (1/2 inch of neck) together as shown in the photo.

Step 12:

Cut the head piece.

Step 13:

Make the head as round as possible and tape the head ends together to form a cylinder.

Step 14:

Cut a head top.

Step 15:

Glue the head top to the head.

Step 16:

Glue the neck piece to the bottom of the head.

Step 17:

Glue the "wings" of the neck piece to the body.

Step 18:

Cut two top support pieces.

Step 19:

Glue the top support pieces together as shown.

Step 20:

Cut a top piece.

Step 21:

Glue the "wings" of the top support piece to the top.

Step 22:

Cut two base pieces.

Step 23:

Glue the base pieces together.

Step 24:

Cut twelve brace pieces. Glue six brace pieces together twice.

Glue the brace assemblies to the top support to make it more sturdy as shown in the photo.

Step 25:

Glue the robot character to the base.

Step 26:

Put a face on the character.

Step 27:

First, I poked a hole in the end of the top support. Then, I used six pound fishing line (to reduce visibility) and created a loop that is about two and one half inches long. String or thread will work here--whatever you have.

Step 28:

Cut twelve inches of fishing line (three times) and tape it to the top in the positions shown in the photo.

Step 29:

Push the pencil through the 2 1/2" loop you made in the earlier step.

Step 30:

Place tape (I used duct tape) on the base--at similar spots as the tape on the top.

Step 31:

With one hand, hold the top in "floating" position while securing each of the three pieces of fishing line, one at a time. The three "strings" will have slight tension--they will not be loose.

Step 32:

Cut off the surplus fishing line (string).

Step 33:

This is quite stable and will even support a small load.

Cardboard Speed Challenge

Runner Up in the
Cardboard Speed Challenge

13 People Made This Project!

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45 Comments

5
AndrewDouglasBird
AndrewDouglasBird

1 year ago

This is super cool! Going to make it today.

I redrew the patterns in CAD and created a PDF that can be printed on 8-1/2 x 11 sheets of paper. Just print at 100% scaling. Then you can glue to cardboard and cutout.

0
HarryJ5
HarryJ5

Reply 5 months ago

👌😊
tHANK YOU !

0
NourWalid
NourWalid

Reply 5 months ago

Thanx

0
ManoelG3
ManoelG3

Reply 1 year ago

Thank you!

1
MikeTheMaker
MikeTheMaker

Reply 1 year ago

Cool--thanks for the nice CAD patterns!

1
AndrewDouglasBird
AndrewDouglasBird

Reply 1 year ago

I realized I made a mistake and only included 1 neck piece. I updated it with 2 now.

0
andrey1025
andrey1025

1 year ago

it inspired me and I made it

IMG_20200510_160649.jpgIMG_20200510_160812.jpgIMG_20200510_160708.jpg
0
MikeTheMaker
MikeTheMaker

Reply 1 year ago

That is super nice--really has the "floating" look!

0
apal13
apal13

1 year ago

great

0
ElectroFrank
ElectroFrank

1 year ago

Lovely project ! But please may I suggest this could be done in less than 33 steps ? One sheet of card showing the dimensions of all the pieces could be a single step, as could the assembly of the figure !

2
ManoelG3
ManoelG3

Reply 1 year ago

It's impressive how you can still find someone to complain about everything. The OP puts in an detailed Instructable, and, just for be clear, he show the task with a great number of steps, and, still, there's someone complaining! :-(

1
AwfullyQuiet
AwfullyQuiet

Reply 1 year ago

It doesn't matter if you cut the pizza into 4, 8, or 16 slices, you have the same amount of pizza.

0
ManoelG3
ManoelG3

Reply 1 year ago

And you can also cut the pizza in squares and eat then as appetizzer's fingerfood - no needs to use a fork.

0
ElectroFrank
ElectroFrank

Reply 1 year ago

Hi Manoel,
Here I am, making helpful constructive comments for improvement.
And there is you, just complaining about it ;-)

1
ManoelG3
ManoelG3

Reply 1 year ago

I made a helpful constructive comment about your own attitude! ;-)

0
ThetaCreative
ThetaCreative

Reply 1 year ago

Yes, the amount of steps is quite overwhelming.

0
zanod
zanod

1 year ago

I saw this about a week ago, and made it last night from memory.
It took my 5-year-old grandson about 5 seconds to work out how it works.

P1010482.JPG
0
MikeTheMaker
MikeTheMaker

Reply 1 year ago

It looks great! Kudos to your grandson for understanding how it works!

0
aimfriz
aimfriz

1 year ago

I just looked at the picture and instantly knew what to do. It was so easy and not that complicated.

0
zanod
zanod

Reply 1 year ago

So did I. I saw it about a week ago, and made it last night just from remembering what it looked like. It was really simple - but I'd give marks for the idea - quite a novelty. There's a photo of mine in the comments.