Corner Shelf for Plants in Wood and Metal

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Introduction: Corner Shelf for Plants in Wood and Metal

About: Passionate of DIY of any kind, I am not of the trade (I am developer in computing) but I am self-taught and I like to learn new things. I decided to share my creations with you through photos and videos. I do…

I'm getting into arc welding! I bought a small inverter welding machine and here is my first creation with: a shelf made up of a welded steel structure and 4 solid beech trays.

It is installed in a corner of a room and receives green plants of different sizes.

Total height: 2m
Dimensions of a tray: 40x70 cms

Tools:

  • metal Cut-Off Saw
  • MMA welding machine
  • drill press
  • circular saw
  • screwdriver

Supplies

Material:

  • 4 square steel tubes, length 2m, section 35mm, thickness 2mm
  • 2 raw iron angles, length 2m, section 21mm, thickness 3mm
  • 2 glued laminated beech shelves 200x40 cms, 18mm thick
  • 2 cans of black satin effect spray paint 400mL
  • 4 plastic 35mm square end caps
  • anti-rust primer
  • glazier
  • screws

Step 1: Fusion 360

Drawing the project in 3D allows you to better understand the result but also to make precise plans that are easy to follow, which avoids errors.

For that I used Fusion 360 !

https://a360.co/3eDzusq

The plans are available in PDF format.

Step 2: Cutout

The metal structure is made up of two different elements: square tubes and angle profiles.

I bought the square tubes in 2m length, so no need to cut them. For the steel angles, I cut them with a small Cut-Off Saw.

Then I grinded the edge of the pieces to remove the burrs and improve the grip of the weld.

I also drilled 3 holes on each bar so that I could screw the wood planks into it.

Step 3: Welding Preparation

I cleaned the metal with a grinder fitted with a flap disc, then I traced the location of the top of the angles.

I degreased the parts well with acetone.

Step 4: Welding

I bought a small welding machine (Gysmi 160P) and the necessary protective equipment. I start in welding with the first tests were not necessarily conclusive. There are welds that I had to start over !

I used magnetic brackets to hold the pieces.

Then I smoothed the welds with a flap disc to have something more "beautiful".

Step 5: Paint

Once well degreased, I spent a first coat of spray antirust primer.

And then I applied 2 coats of satin black spray paint.

Step 6: Detail

I put plastic caps on the ends of the tubes.

Step 7: Cutting Boards

I cut the 4 trays in solid beech glued laminated 18mm thick.

I used for this my new plunge saw that I paid myself thanks to the contest that I won recently!

Step 8: Wood Protection

I applied 2 coats of wood sealer.

The objective is to protect it from possible water splashes when watering the plants.

I used special staircase vitrifier V33 which I had left.

Step 9: Mounting

The 4 trays are installed and screwed from below with small flat head screws.

Step 10: Enjoy!

In the same principle, you can imagine any kind of size and shape! A bookcase, a shoe cabinet... get started!

If you like this Instructable, please consider voting for me in the furniture contest!

And if you have any questions, I'm here to help!
Any advice for me? I like to learn too!

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    16 Comments

    0
    Yonatan24
    Yonatan24

    7 weeks ago

    I'm curious if this could be made without the 4th square tube, the one closest to you when you took the picture. I think it would look nicer without it.

    1
    Alfetta159
    Alfetta159

    Reply 6 weeks ago

    I did something like you suggest, however heavy loads have to be placed strategically where their loads' centers of gravity are close to a line across the vertical supports. It also requires a hook to be screwed into the wall stud at the corner of the wall so that the highest shelf can hook onto and keep in from sagging. Mine is also 'reversible' where it knocks down and can be reassembled to change its orientation depending on whether you which corner you want (e.g. left or right) and whether you want the longer length on the back wall or side wall.

    IMG_20201230_185411953 (2).jpg
    1
    MagicManu
    MagicManu

    Reply 6 weeks ago

    It's beautiful! Does the wood not warp over time?

    0
    Alfetta159
    Alfetta159

    Reply 6 weeks ago

    I built this is the late '80s. It's still looks pretty straight. It's solid maple. The panels are jointed and came off the shelf from the lumber yard, but no veneer, plywood, MDF, particle board or any other manufactured lumber.

    0
    MagicManu
    MagicManu

    Reply 6 weeks ago

    Ok, thank you for this information, a beautiful creation that lasts over time!

    0
    MagicManu
    MagicManu

    Reply 6 weeks ago

    Maybe, but the whole thing would not be stable enough and would not support heavy loads!

    2
    MarkH342
    MarkH342

    6 weeks ago

    Beautiful, clean design.

    0
    MagicManu
    MagicManu

    Reply 6 weeks ago

    Thank you!

    1
    Alfetta159
    Alfetta159

    Tip 6 weeks ago

    Very nice. Often, display shelfs like these are called etageres.

    0
    MagicManu
    MagicManu

    Reply 6 weeks ago

    It's funny since "etagere" is the French name too!

    1
    Denbigh007
    Denbigh007

    7 weeks ago

    Super Cool! Well done

    0
    MagicManu
    MagicManu

    Reply 6 weeks ago

    Thank you for the compliments!

    1
    seamster
    seamster

    7 weeks ago

    I like it, nice work!

    0
    MagicManu
    MagicManu

    Reply 6 weeks ago

    How nice ;)

    0
    MagicManu
    MagicManu

    Reply 6 weeks ago

    Thanks ;)