Crocheted Soda Can Hat

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Introduction: Crocheted Soda Can Hat

About: I'm a designer, maker, writer, and artist based in upstate NY.

A couple of weeks ago, a friend of mine posted a picture online of a cowboy hat made from beer cans, and jokingly asked for someone to make them one for their birthday. I replied, "I could probably make that."

So fast-forward a week, and said friend drops off six La Croix cans at the lobby of my apartment (social distancing!) while doing some other errands, and said I had free creative reign of the project.

I loved figuring out how I was going to do this. There are a couple of other tutorials online, but none of them were detailed enough for me, so I had to figure a lot out on my own. I had so much fun working on this hat!

Supplies

To make one of these unique hats for yourself, you'll need these things (along with some crocheting experience):

  • Three regular-sized soda cans (or beer, seltzer, etc.)
  • Yarn
  • Crochet hook - Size G/4.25mm
  • Craft/utility knife
  • Scissors
  • Hole punch
  • Gloves (optional)

Step 1: Cut Your Cans

I was given six cans to work with, but in the end, I realized I only needed three. Make sure they're all very clean and dry (and not sticky) before you start working with them.

You'll be dealing with SHARP can edges, a utility knife, and sharp scissors in this step. Please be careful and wear gloves if you need to.

First, use a utility knife to (very carefully!) make two cuts near the back label (bar code area) of the can. If your scissors are sharp enough, you can just use them instead of a utility knife. Always cut AWAY from you.

Then make one long cut in between the two smaller cuts with the utility knife.

Now you can grab your scissors and start cutting around the can. First, cut off the top of the can. Then cut all the way around again to cut off the bottom of the can.

You should now have a long rectangle. Trim any jagged edges, as those are the most likely to cut you.

You will be able to get two panels from each can. I didn't even measure, I just cut one and then used it as a pattern for the rest.

Round the edges with your scissors. Now they shouldn't have any sharp bits and you can work with them really easily now.

You only need five rounded rectangles.

Step 2: Punch Some Holes

Grab your hole punch and punch four holes, one in each rounded corner. Then evenly punch two more holes on each side. Again, I didn't measure or anything; I just eyeballed it.

After you punch all the holes in the first one, you can use it as a pattern for the other four. Just place the first one on top of the next one and use a marker to mark where the holes should be punched on the second one.

Continue until all five can panels have twelve evenly-spaced holes punched in them.

Step 3: Start Crocheting

If you've ever crocheted a granny square, then this step will be really easy.

Make a slip stitch and chain three (this will act as a first double crochet) into the first punched hole on one of the corners. Double crochet twice. Chain one, and double crochet three more times.

Then double crochet three times each in the next two punched holes.

When you get to the second corner, double crochet three times, chain stitch, and double crochet three more times.

Then double crochet three times each in the next two punched holes.

When you reach the third corner, double crochet three times, chain stitch, and double crochet three more times.

Then double crochet three times each in the next two punched holes.

Slip stitch to connect to the first punched hole you crocheted into.

Then you're done!

I think it takes more time writing down the instructions than actually doing the crocheting. It's really easy once you get the hang of it. Do this for all five can panels.

Step 4: Make a Slanted Edge

Since you want your hat to be wider at the base and taper up towards the top, you'll need to make slanted edges on each can panel.

To do this, take one panel and work on its left side only.

Make a slip knot and start from the corner. Slip stitch into the next two stitches. Then single crochet in the next three stitches. Then half-double crochet in the next three stitches. Then double crochet in the next three stitches. Then triple crochet in the last three stitches.

This gives you a gradual slope on one edge. Do this to all five can panels. Remember to only do this on one side, the same side each time. I chose to do it on each can panel's left side.

Step 5: Crochet Them Together

Take two of your can panels and put them right sides together, making sure they're both oriented the correct way. When you do this, it should mean that you have one normal side and one slanted side together.

Single crochet them together all the way down. Unfold it and you will see there's an A-shape in between each panel. Do this to every panel until they've all been connected.

Step 6: Hide Your Ends

Connect the ends together using the same single crochet technique. Flip it right side out.

You'll be left with a lot of yarn ends, so get a large embroidery needle and sew in all the ends.

Step 7: Crochet the Brim

Now we'll crochet a brim for the hat.

Double crochet around the base, making two double crochets in every fourth stitch. So it looks like this: dc, dc, dc, two dcs, dc, dc, dc, two dcs, etc. When you reach the end, slip stitch into the nearest dc. Chain three (this will act as your first dc), and crochet the second row the same way you did the first.

Step 8: Crochet the Top

To make the top of the hat, start with the magic circle.

First round: Into this magic circle, chain 3 (counts as 1dc) 1dc, *ch1, 2dc* repeat ** until you have 6 2dc’s separated by 1ch each. Join with a slip stitch into the nearest stitch to close the round. Slip stitch three times to the nearest open space.

Second round: chain 3 (counts as 1dc) 1dc, ch1, 2dc into the SAME space, ch1, into the next space dc2, ch1, 2dc in the same space, repeat sequence until you go all the way around. Slip stitch three times to the nearest open space.

Third round: chain 3 (counts as 1dc) 1dc, ch2, 2dc into the next space, ch2, repeat sequence until all the way around. Slip stitch three times to the nearest open space.

Fourth round: chain 3 (counts as 1dc) 1dc, ch2, 2dc into the next space, ch2, repeat
sequence until all the way around. Slip stitch three times to the nearest open space.

Fifth round: chain 3 (counts as 1dc) 1dc, ch1, 2dc into the SAME space, ch1,
into the next space dc2, ch1, 2dc in the same space, repeat sequence until you go all the way around. Slip stitch three times to the nearest open space.

Sixth round: chain 3 (counts as 1dc) 1dc, ch2, 2dc into the next space, ch2, repeat
sequence until all the way around. Slip stitch three times to the nearest open space.

Seventh round: chain 3 (counts as 1dc) 1dc, ch2, 2dc into the next space, ch2, repeat
sequence until all the way around. Slip stitch three times to the nearest open space.

The circle you just made will be slightly rounded or dome-shaped, and that's a good thing.

Step 9: Connect the Top to the Hat

All that you need to do to connect the top you just made to the hat is place it on top and single crochet all the way around, making sure your crochet hook goes in both the hat and the top of the hat. Once you're done, snip off your yarn and use your embroidery needle to sew in the yarn ends.

Step 10: Finished!

And that's it! I like the way the brim turned out because it's pretty malleable. Straighten it out and it can look like a newsy fedora, or fold it up and it kind of looks like a hat Blossom Russo would wear in 1993.

It's completely unique -- it's a very '70s style and idea, but hilariously modernized with trendy La Croix cans.

Please let me know if you make one using this tutorial -- I'd love to see pictures!

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    10 Comments

    0
    AnandM54
    AnandM54

    1 year ago

    Wow....brilliant!!

    0
    Maggie_Crafts
    Maggie_Crafts

    1 year ago

    I love the bag is is so unique I for sure will try to make that





    I have the same yarn
    Why don’t you look at what I made? I did not use the same yarn though


    0
    Penolopy Bulnick
    Penolopy Bulnick

    1 year ago

    Very unique hat :)

    Do you think it would get too hot in the sun?

    0
    ellygibson
    ellygibson

    Reply 1 year ago

    Great question. I honestly don't know but probably. All I know is that people have been making these for decades. I think they're mostly novelty items. :)

    0
    Penolopy Bulnick
    Penolopy Bulnick

    Reply 1 year ago

    Omg, I actually googled it and I love what I'm seeing :D

    0
    ellygibson
    ellygibson

    Reply 1 year ago

    They are so cool, right?!

    0
    Marian crafts
    Marian crafts

    1 year ago

    I have the literal same yarn. You should check out what I made

    0
    ellygibson
    ellygibson

    Reply 1 year ago

    Yeah that is the same yarn -- awesome! I love the bag!