7 Foot Pool Table Restauration

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Introduction: 7 Foot Pool Table Restauration

About: I love doing everything what has some connection with any kind of technology. I love to see how stuff works and how to make it. P.s. about my username if someone is curious: "In Vino VERitas"

Hello everybody!

In this instructable I will show one of my summer projects.


So I have an old barn at home which was mostly used as a depository for old useless stuff. So while I was thinking about how to run away from all that COVID circus that has been going on lately, an idea of making a billiard room (man cave) fell on my mind. In the end, it turned out that this was probably the best decision of the year, while this is surely the most used room in the whole village.

For this project, I used the wood (fir) that was drying for some 5 years, it's very light and easy to work with and I had it a lot laying around.

Since there was no need to "reinvent the wheel", I got my hands on one old billiard table from a bar and scavenge the all usable parts which I will show you later.


Used tools: chainsaw, jigsaw, sander, sabre saw, planer tool

Cloth: Iwan Simonis 860, royal blue.

Total cost (without wood): around 400-500usd

Total time spent: 1 month, everyday piece by piece

Total weight: around 320kg

Final value: Priceless

Step 1: Disassembly of the Old Table

The reason why I went through all this mess of taking the old parts is the playing board made out of stone. It is 2.5cm thick and around 180kg heavy board, perfectly flat. It is widely known that stone boards are the best. They don't flex over time and they don't care about the moisture in the air, unlike the wooden boards which can not hold perfectly flat surface over a long period of time. I assume that we all want that our balls are following the laws of physics, not randomly curving on the table like they're drunk, right?

So parts that were scavenged are threaded leg pads used for leveling the bed, playing table, ball rails within the table, and bump rails. Everything else had to be redesigned.

Step 2: Sketching

I don't have many sketches that I can show, since there were only readable to me. Logically, it is always a good thing to have at least a rough plan on what and how will you be doing the project.

I was using standard dimensions found on the site below and everything else was adjusted accordingly:

https://www.dimensions.com/element/7-foot-billiard...

Step 3: Main Frame Design

I've forgotten to take a picture of the all planks I've used in this project, but you'll get the point soon enough. Another thing to mention, I don't have the exact measures of every part because most of it was done "on the go", even if I want it to, I could not remember it.

For the main frame I've used 6m long piece of wood which was around 20x25cm wide and had it cut to desired dimensions. Legs were cut out of thicker 30x30cm pillar. This is starting to be heavy..
I must add that later I've figured that those pillars could be connected with a much stronger connection, so please don't copy the way I connected them, moreover, I recommend you to look under the roof of your house for joint tips.

Step 4: Supports for the Stone Table

It's time to prepare a place where the table will sit. Because I've planned on putting ball rails under the table, so that every ball which goes in the hole also is collected to one place, it was important to leave a space in the edges and middle part. Here I had to be careful that the ball won't be stuck when it wants to go below the table, that's why spacers were needed.

Step 5: Let's Make Some Side Panels

We must not forget aesthetics. This is me, trying not to forget about it. A lot of thinking went into the side panels solution, in the end, the solution in the pictures seemed like the best compromise between looks-precision forgiving - difficulty of making.

Step 6: Ball Chamber

Before making all the internal rails, the place for balls had to be mounted.

Step 7: Ball Mechanism

Because "simple is boring", I've decided to make all the balls go to one place so they can be easily collected afterward.

Step 8: Top Frame

The planks I needed had to be 4.5cm thick and 14cm wide, but I had 5cm thick and 30cm wide. That was probably the trickiest part because I only had some curvy planks, so a lot of sanding and flattening had to be done. Final flattening was done by screwing the top frame to the main frame.

I used the old frame as a template for the holes on the new frame. It was still good enough for that.

Step 9: The Cloth

This is the part where I used tutorials on youtube on how to put a new cloth on the pool table. The most important thing here is to find proper glue. Neostik glue in spay is the best, they say.

This guy for example explains well for this type of board, but there are many others:

Step 10: Bumpers

Also for this part I've used a generous amount of Youtube tutorials on "how to", it took some time but it also turned out pretty well. A staple gun is a must!

Step 11: Shall We Play?

Time has finally come. After almost a month of carving and sanding, it is possible to play a game on the table. I couldn't find free time for a whole week to varnish, because we were constantly playing.

Step 12: The Bar

Well, it's also practical to have a bar so people don't spill the drinks over a billiard. There were some planks left, just enough to make a bar, not too big, not too small.

Step 13: The Cue Holder

I think that the pictures are good enough for description. This seemed like a much cheaper, nicer, and simpler cue holder than the ones I've seen on the market.

Step 14: The End!

Thank you very much for going through the whole instructable. I really hope that you liked it! I'm not usually working with wood, so this was all kinda new to me but there but I have learned a lot! My first intention was not to make a tutorial about how to make a pool table, so that's why maybe some pictures and steps are missing. If you are curious about something or it's maybe unclear, feel free to comment below.

Hopefully, I have also given you some new ideas, I believe that many people want to have a billiard table at home. Have a nice day!

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    10 Comments

    0
    XenoMorphPT
    XenoMorphPT

    1 year ago

    Most impressive amount of work. Massive restoration, the old pool table sure deserved this.

    0
    Buckie8611
    Buckie8611

    1 year ago

    Wonderful build. Looks like a lot of hard work and planning. Congrats. If I may be a little critical, pool cues should never be stored on a rack horizontally. Mother earth will warp the heck out of them turning the cues into bananas. Otherwise great job!

    0
    ivver
    ivver

    Reply 1 year ago

    Thank you! 😃
    Also thanks for the tip, I didn't think that it could be such a big deal. Since that slipped my mind, I guess the next step will be the redesign of the cue holder.

    0
    Buckie8611
    Buckie8611

    Reply 1 year ago

    Thanks for the wonderful instructable. Your pool table will be admired for generation's. I know my rebuilt 9 foot table became a focal point of many great memories for us. I wish you and your family the same. "Rackem Up"

    0
    ivver
    ivver

    Reply 1 year ago

    Thank you, it was my pleasure! That was actually also the point of the whole story, to make some great memories. :)
    Feel free to post pictures of your billiard if you like, I believe that others will find it interesting too.

    0
    007cardo
    007cardo

    1 year ago

    WOW!! That's more than a restoration...that's a complete rebuild! I really like the heavy look you created with the dimensional lumber. It looks great! Well done.

    0
    ivver
    ivver

    Reply 1 year ago

    hahah thanks! Yea I wasn't sure how to name this project, maybe I should have called it "DIY Billiard table" hmm... :D

    0
    aquaris12
    aquaris12

    1 year ago

    thank you bro this is my first time to see how working this

    0
    seamster
    seamster

    1 year ago

    Very ambitious, with impressive results! Well done, thank you for showing this process. If I ever have the chance, this looks like a fun project to take on.

    0
    ivver
    ivver

    Reply 1 year ago

    Thank you! I'm glad you've liked it! Yes, this was quite ambitious but also a good way to have an "express learning" in woodworking and pool table design. If I'll be ever doing pool table again, I will most certainly do it differently. At first, I was actually quite surprised no one has done it before like that because usually, people tend to make it cheapest as it goes but it's rarely the table you will enjoy playing every day. I kinda tried to achieve both here. All in all, it's worth it, you just need some wood and brainstorming :D