DIY Modern Accent Wall

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Introduction: DIY Modern Accent Wall

About: Hi! I’m Heidi. On my page, you will find DIY projects; from woodworking, to concrete work. I love creating and sharing my experiences with you. Subscribe to my Youtube channel to see more super trendy, budget …

It's been a hot minute since I posted a tutorial, but I have been working on a little something behind the scenes...A BABY! And now it's time to get the nursery ready. I've always wanted to do one of these geometric accent walls and I thought baby's room would be the perfect spot. I love how subtle and modern this accent wall is and I love how EASY it was! Make sure you stay tuned and see what other DIYs come out of getting baby's room ready!

Click here so you don't miss a video! https://bit.ly/2Xe639L

JOIN ME ONLINE: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/timberandtea_

Supplies

MATERIALS

1"x2" pre primed MDF- https://www.homedepot.ca/product/alexandria-mould...

18 gauge brad nailer- https://homedepot.sjv.io/q5m9b

1 1/2" brad nails- https://homedepot.sjv.io/q5m9b

Spackle- https://homedepot.sjv.io/q5m9b

Paint- This colour is Black Bamboo by Behr

Step 1: DIY Modern Accent Wall

The first thing I did was draw out my design on graph paper.

Step 2:

You can use either wood or MDF for your accent wall. I chose to go with MDF since it will keep it's shape better and be less likely to warp or bow.

I also decided to pre-paint all my pieces BEFORE putting them up on the wall to save myself the trouble of painting all the edges and getting in all the corners with a brush once it was up, which I would definitely recommend.

Step 3:

I started with my frame. You can do a frame, or not, but I feel like it looks more finished with it framed in. If you decide to do a border, make sure you measure all 4 side of your wall and not just the bottom and side as there could be even an 1/8" difference between the top and bottom of the wall and you don't want that kind of gap in your wood or MDF.

Step 4:

I used an 18 gauge brad nailer with 1 1/2" nails but you could also use a 16 gauge brad nailer, you would just have slightly bigger nail holes to fill.

Check out my full video tutorial to see how I measured and spaced my boards.

Step 5:

I used spackle to fill my nail holes and my seems and then gave it a light sand. Then I vacuumed my entire wall and wiped it with a slightly dampened cloth before touching it up with one more quick coat of paint.

Step 6:

I rolled over the front faces of all my boards for my final touch up. I used Black Bamboo paint by Behr.

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    10 Comments

    0
    charlessenf-gm
    charlessenf-gm

    Tip 8 months ago

    When sketching your design to scale, consider scaling the width of your lines as well as the overall dimensions of the construction.
    I played with the sketch above in an attempt to scale the width to scale (2") and It seems to make it easier to visualize the result.

    Design - Wall 01.bmpDesign - Wall 03.bmp
    0
    kayakdiver
    kayakdiver

    11 months ago

    Gonna' do it!
    Just what I needed to cover some perpetual cracks in my walls.
    Thanks and best wishes for a healthy, happy baby!
    signed, Grandpa (X3) Mark.

    0
    charlessenf-gm
    charlessenf-gm

    Reply 8 months ago

    " to cover some perpetual cracks in my walls "
    If you are able and the design permits, wide(r) boards secured to one side of the PC - basically allowing the wall to move beneath the Design - and paint the wall and design elements independently - again to prevent the movement in the wall from 'telegraphing' and showing up where the wood joins the wall with the latex paint tearing.
    When I install molding that takes several 'turns' 'round this corner, cabinet or that, I cut and paint each piece and Super (gel) Glue the pieces together before nailing the assembly in place. If you assembled much, or all of a design before 'hanging' in on the wall, the cracks it covers and future wall movement might well remain hidden 'till long after the sale closed.

    0
    Timber and Tea
    Timber and Tea

    Reply 11 months ago

    yes, do it! thanks for the well wishes :) :)

    0
    4currans
    4currans

    11 months ago

    Love this! Doing this! Pregnant women rule! Thank you for posting this.

    0
    Timber and Tea
    Timber and Tea

    Reply 11 months ago

    hahaha yes! do it!

    0
    tonyio
    tonyio

    11 months ago on Step 6

    Wow! Big impact, minimal technology. I love the simplicity of it. Thanks for sharing!

    0
    Timber and Tea
    Timber and Tea

    Reply 11 months ago

    right?!? it's such a simple thing, and so subtle, but such a big impact!

    0
    charlessenf-gm
    charlessenf-gm

    11 months ago

    Nice result - looks impressive.
    Suggest adhesive where there is no stud.
    Also, be careful not to shoot 'long' nails through the drywall in case there is an electrical wire running behind the wall. Long being more than 1/2" (the drywall) plus the thickness of your trim pieces. If you shoot the nails 'downhill' you can add a quarter inch and increase the holding power of your nails - they act like hooks even if 'loose.' Similar to those little brass colored picture hangers that look like a nail shot through a round piece at a 45 degree angle. But adhesive couldn't hurt!

    0
    Timber and Tea
    Timber and Tea

    Reply 11 months ago

    Great tip! and I did consider adhesive, but decided against it because if I ever want to remove it one day, I can, and I would just have to fill in the nail holes, but if I used adhesive I would be re-drywalling that whole wall I think!