DIY Universal HEPA Filter Prototype Made With Open Source 3D Printed Parts

Introduction: DIY Universal HEPA Filter Prototype Made With Open Source 3D Printed Parts

I’m going to show you my version of a custom HEPA filter made using a standard HEPA vacuum cleaner filter and some 3d printed parts that you can find on thingiverse using the link: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:4247922

FIRST OF ALL: THIS FILTER IS A PROTOTYPE AND HAS NOT BEEN TESTED OR APPROVED BY ANY FIELD SPECIALIST SO USE IT AT YOUR OWN RISK

This filter can also be used on different 3d printed masks as long as they have a round hole with a diameter of 40mm.

The filter model I am using is an Electrolux vacuum filter model ef75b (part with grey plastic material). Some vague information on the internet suggests that this filter is classified as hepa10 or 11 which would mean it has a filtering efficiency between 80 and 95% of particles bigger than 0.3 microns. (I would recommend at least HEPA 13 for a good protection based on what is commonly found on the market and what Wikipedia says about HEPA filter class)

IMPORTANT:NOT ALL HEPA FILTERS HAVE 99.9% EFFICIENCY YOU CAN FIND MORE INFORMATION ON WIKIPEDIA: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HEPA

The best part about this prototype is that you can use a HEPA filter cut out from different filter models with a higher class, as long as the folds are 13mm or smaller.

Supplies

3D Printer

HEPA material from a HEPA filter

Cyanoacrylate / SuperGlue / Polyurethane Resin

Step 1: Printing and Preparation of the Filter

Download files from https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:4247922 and print the main part (there are two different models ).

After i printed the main filter parts, i cut out the hepa filter to the desired length.

If you are using the HEPA material from a square model filter you should also check what is the right number of folds you need to cover the whole radius of the circle and stick the first and last fold of the filter in such a way that there is no air gap. SuperGlue should work to stick the folds together.

Step 2: Sealing Filter in Place

After that i used cyanoacrylate to seal the filter in place. the cyanoacrylate known also as superglue is very toxic if the vapors are inhaled so the filter has to be made in a ventilated area and left for a few hours to set.

You can also use polyurethane resin which would be a better alternative and it sets in about 5 minutes

Step 3: Finished

I made a few other parts for attaching it to a mask, connecting two filters together and sealing the end of the filter. you will find all the parts on thingiverse.

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    4 Comments

    0
    Penolopy Bulnick
    Penolopy Bulnick

    1 year ago

    Thanks for sharing your design :)

    You should consider entering the 3D Printed Contest :)

    0
    LifeHackerMax
    LifeHackerMax

    Reply 1 year ago

    Thank you so much! You are too kind :)

    0
    ironsmiter
    ironsmiter

    1 year ago

    looks good :-)


    Three IMPORTANT things to note.
    1) right now, people are trying anything they can to replace n95 masks, and while better than nothing, this is NOT an adequate substitute (reference this 2003 article about the SARS corona virus outbreak https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC156669/ )
    2) This WOULD make an awesome wood turning mask
    3) FACIAL HAIR. I feel you on this one, but either petroleum jelly or shaving, to create a proper seal. Without one or the other, the beard creates around 15-20% completely unfiltered leaking. your 95% hepa filter would be operating at around 80% (slightly better than a homemade t-shirt material 'surgical mask' at 75%)

    For the glue... I would use what the industry uses... hot-melt.

    0
    LifeHackerMax
    LifeHackerMax

    Reply 1 year ago

    Thank you for commenting! You are right! My project is a preliminary design as a better alternative to what is out there as open source (at least in my opinion). Of course it needs a lot of fine tuning, but not without some tests from specialists. Haven't found UPLA filter on the market that is available.
    My target was: 1. easy to build by the maker communities with easy to find materials (3d prints, vacuum HEPA13, glue, silicone), 2. one fits all (silicone is flexible) 3. best seal possible (silicone), 4. easy to separate parts and sterilize.(the 3d printed parts can be molded into polyurethane resin). I know I need a shave :)))))