DIY Carbon Tape Heated Vest Modular System

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Introduction: DIY Carbon Tape Heated Vest Modular System

About: DIY carbon heated clothing.
My main idea was to make a modular system that can be used with different clothes. I made two identical heating panels that can be combined into a single vest or attach to any outfit.


It is fully warmed up to 40 degrees in less than one minute.

Step 1: Sewing

Each panel has 2 meters of carbon heated tape fron www.carbonheater.us and now on Amazon. Chose the maximum width of the tape to provide a very even heating. Size panels 34 x 42 cm, since it is better suited for the size of my clothing.
In each panels tape connected in parallel 2x1m and has an independent power button.. It takes about 3A under 12V (36W) for each one or 72W together.

Step 2: "Soldering"

You can sew wire to carbon tape to make a good and flexible connection.  The contact place shouldn't be hotter than the tape itself. If not you must increase the contact area. Sewed contact very flexible.

Step 3: Connecting

Contacts may be sewed by sewing machine or just wraped with a wire.
But as you can see sewed contact is colder than the tape itself (left contact).
Wraped contact (on the right) is more hotter than tape.

Step 4: Using As a Modular System

On each panel sewn 4 pieces of Velcro . Now I can combine them into a single heated vest . A bit like a bulletproof vest:). It's very soft and thin.

Step 5: Using As a Modular System

Due to Velcro this vest will be comfortable to wear for a big man or a small woman.

Step 6: Using As a Heated Module

Each panel can be used independently with any clothes.
On the inner surface of conventional jackets I sewed 4 pieces of Velcro.
Now I can at any time fix the heating panel on a jacket and make it heated.

Step 7: And Yes, You Can Wash It!

2 People Made This Project!

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42 Discussions

0
NealH
NealH

7 years ago on Step 5

where can i find the tape?

0
scaulfield18
scaulfield18

Question 2 months ago on Step 2

Hi Shenzhen,

I have no background in electronics, so forgive me if these questions are very basic:
What is the rectangular copper material overlaid on the carbon fibre in the Step 2 picture 1? Has it been stitched in place?
Also in Step 2 picture 1, what is the little black rectangular splitter shown in the bottom right of each panel that you use to feed out the three cables?
In step 2 picture 2, how does this rectangular splitter feed the power to the beginning, middle and end of the carbon fibre strip? I only see a wiring going to the middle of the strip, and the end at the centre of the panel. I can't see a wire going to the end at the bottom right of the panel. But presumably there is one, yes?

1
Shenzhen
Shenzhen

Answer 2 months ago

this is a bare wire. You need to bare 10-15 centimeters of the wire, then fold it in a zigzag to form a platform. Such a large area is needed in order to ensure reliable contact between the copper wire and the carbon tape. This bare wire pad simply needs to be sewn to the carbon tape with regular thread.

0
scaulfield18
scaulfield18

Reply 2 months ago

Thanks, Shenzhen.

1.Instead of creating a separate platform of bare wire to make a contact with the power carrying copper wire, would it work using the AWG18 multi-stranded wire as an alternative to carry the power and contact the carbon tape (spread out on the carbon tape and glued with silver conductive glue), similar to what you did in the other ‘DIY Carbon Tape Heated Vest’ instructable (https://www.instructables.com/id/DIY-carbon-tape-heated-vest/)?
Is there a reason why you don’t use this method here?

2.What is the little splitter thing in the bottom right corner of the vest?
Is it necessary, or could I apply the power wire in parallel, as per what you did in the other ‘DIY Carbon Tape Heated Vest’?
If this splitter is necessary, could you advise on the exact name, so I can look up this component?

0
scaulfield18
scaulfield18

Reply 4 weeks ago

May I ask what is the purpose of the triangular pieces of fabric laid in between the folded edges of the carbon fibre?

Capture.PNG
0
Shenzhen
Shenzhen

Reply 4 weeks ago

It was a mistake. You can fold carbon as it is, without fabric between.

0
Shenzhen
Shenzhen

Reply 2 months ago

1. Is there a reason why you don’t use this method here? Without silver conductive glue we need big connection area. 45mm width carbon required very big connection area.
But with silver conductive glue you can "using the AWG18 multi-stranded wire as an alternative to carry the power
and contact the carbon tape (spread out on the carbon tape and glued
with silver conductive glue"

0
scaulfield18
scaulfield18

Answer 2 months ago

Just adding a screenshot of the wiring to clarify the picture I'm confused about step 2 pic 2

Screenshot_20200817_182231_com.android.chrome.jpg
0
MallardZ
MallardZ

Question 1 year ago

Hi, I definitely need to make myself something like this but was wondering what exactly you used to power each vest. I was worried it would be very heavy or expensive. Do you have an instructable that shows how you make the battery packs?! Also how long do they last and how heavy are they? Oh and can you / how do you recharge them?... Sorry for the barrage of questions!

0
Shenzhen
Shenzhen

Answer 1 year ago

Yes, it's a difficalt question for everyone including Tesla cars. A good heated vest/jacket should be 30 Watts of power at least. So you have to use a battery of 30W for 1 hour of using. That means 60W for 2 hours, 90W for 3h, 120W for 4h, etc. The best battery for DIY for now is Panasonic 18650 3400mAh. One battery weight is just 50g and it has about 10W of power. So you need 6 of them (total weight ~300g) for 2 hour.
https://www.amazon.com/Zehui-Rechargeable-Panasoni...
Battery should be connected by protection board
https://www.amazon.com/Recovery-Lithium-Protection...
This has charge function also.
Or you can buy a ready to use power bank 12v and at least 3a. Those are good enough:
https://www.amazon.com/TalentCell-Rechargeable-3000mAh-Lithium-External/dp/B01M7Z9Z1N/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1526112074&sr=8-1-fkmr0&keywords=led+strip+battery+bank+12v+3a
https://www.amazon.com/TalentCell-PB240A1-Rechargeable-22400mAh-82-88Wh/dp/B078T7M9HZ/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1526112074&sr=8-2&keywords=led+strip+battery+bank+12v+3a


0
MallardZ
MallardZ

Reply 1 year ago

Thanks for the reply Shenzhen, I don't know if I trust myself to make the battery packs myself without guidance so maybe ready-made power banks are the answer.

0
Shenzhen
Shenzhen

Reply 1 year ago

Make an instructable about your DIY with our carbon and we send you 5 meters for free.

0
JarityT
JarityT

2 years ago

Hi Shenzhen,

Have studied your presentations with great interest but cannot fathom how to adopt it to my indestructible design.(heated face mask)due to my complete ignorance of current. Would appreciate it if you could take a look and give me some tips or ideas???

0
emmascott
emmascott

4 years ago

I am was delighted to find your DIY items. My partner and I have been designing and producing heated wear in NYC. We are interested in finding a manufacturer overseas to produce mass quantities for our line. Would you kindly advise us of any resources you recommend?

With great appreciation and respect,

Kristen

kequad@gmail.com

0
GrassHopperJonez
GrassHopperJonez

5 years ago

How well would this work for heating a seat? I plan on using a seat from an electric grocery cart to make a tricycle and would like to heat the seat. I was thinking of gluing some padding to the seat, adding a layer of cloth, the adding the carbon fiber, then another layer of cloth. Would that be safe?

0
Shenzhen
Shenzhen

Reply 5 years ago on Introduction

Yes it's often used to heat a seat.
Yes it is safe.