Dust Free Sanding Using a Storage Container

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Introduction: Dust Free Sanding Using a Storage Container

About: I run a small channel on YouTube where I show you how to make all sorts of weird and sometimes useful things. I'd love for you to check it out. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0XpZJLKjhvXGOhDjHOLZYw

This is a super simple DIY that can be finished in a single weekend, with stuff you might already have laying around your workshop. Apart from the dust port, I built this using stuff I had leftover from previous projects. Besides being really fun to make, this increases the safety of my shop tremendously by keeping the harmful dust that gets kicked up while sanding out of the air. This project also can also double a vacuum forming table.

Supplies:

Storage Container

Dust Port

Hose Clamp

Silicone Caulk

E6000 adhesive

1/2 In Plywood

120 Grit Sandpaper

Painters/Masking Tape

Sharpie

Ruler

Step 1: Sizing the Hose Clamp

Slide the Hose Clamp over the dust port and tighten it so it's snug to the base of the dust port, but can easily slide off.

Step 2: Centering the Dust Port

Using a mold line already on the container as a guide, line up and center the dust port. Using a sharpie, mark out out the top and bottom holes and connect them to make a vertical center line. Using the hose clamp, center it using the guides and trace out the shape.

Step 3: Making the Hole

After heating up the hose clamp using an electric stove top, grab the hose clamp with pliers to not burn yourself and melt a hole in the container using the circle we drew earlier. Be mindful of the barrel of the hose clamp as it will melt through the box and ruin the shape of the circle. I wasn't paying attention and that is exactly what happened to me. It's not too big of a deal, but we'll have to cover it later on

I chose to melt the hole as opposed to drilling because the polypropylene material that the container is made of tends to shatter when drilled.

Step 4: Gluing and Clamping

Apply a generous amount of E6000 adhesive to the dust port flange and clamp it into the hole. Let the adhesive cure for a full 24 hours.

Step 5: Making the Top

While waiting for the E6000 to cure, I made the top for the container. I glued up 4 pieces of 1/8th in plywood I had laying around my shop and applied some weight to ensure it laid flat. You can skip this step if you use 1/2 in plywood.

Step 6: Cutting the Top to Size

After measuring the lid of the container, I marked out and cut the plywood top to size using my bandsaw and miter saw. A table saw or circular saw would have been a better choice to do this however I don't have any of those so I used what I had. One handy tip is to apply painters tape to the under side of the piece you are cutting to reduce any tear out.

Step 7: Rounding the Corners of the Top

The container I used had a rounded corner on it's lid so I had to knock the corners off of the plywood to get it to fit. In order to get a snug fit I traced the profile of the corner on a piece of paper and transferred it to the plywood. I used my disc sander to get right up to the line. Once that is done, the plywood top should fit perfectly into the lid.

Step 8: Attaching the Top to the Lid

Using more E6000 adhesive, I permanently attached the plywood to the top of the lid. I applied some heavy weight to it to ensure it laid flat.

Step 9: Masking and Applying Silicone

I applied masking tape to the perimeter of the lid and the plywood top. This ensured that the silicone would only get into the groove between them. I applied silicone inside the entire groove and smoothed it out using my finger that I dipped in water. While the silicone is still wet, remove the masking tape to reveal a clean caulk line.

Step 10: Sealing the Hole

In order to create a seal around the hole and the dust port, apply silicone around the perimeter. Using my finger dipped in water I smoothed out the silicone.

Step 11: Attaching the Drilling Template

After finding the center of my top I attached a drilling template I made using spray adhesive. These are 1/4 in holes spaced 1 inch apart .

Step 12: Drilling All the Holes

Using a 1/4 in drill bit in my drill press, I drilled out all of the holes. In total there were 117!

Step 13: Sanding the Container

In order to give the silicone something to grab onto, lightly sand the lip of the container using 120 grit sandpaper.

Step 14: Creating a Silicone Seal

Add a thick bead of silicone around the entire perimeter of the box and allow it to fully cure. This will act as a seal between the container and the lid.

Step 15: Testing It Out

With the silicone fully cured, the only thing left to do was to try it out. Place the lid on the container and secure it with the snaps. Attach the hose from your shop vac and turn it on. For a comparison you can see the dust left on the surface without the suction turned on and with it on. As you can see it it virtually dust free.

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38 Comments

1
hooty-hoo
hooty-hoo

12 months ago

Thanks for the idea. I would think that using peg board would be easier.

0
XYZ Create
XYZ Create

Reply 5 weeks ago

Pegboard would definitely have been less work, but I had a ton of thin plywood I was trying to get rid of and this seemed like the perfect opportunity to do just that.

1
Hydrops
Hydrops

11 months ago

thank you, really useful !

0
XYZ Create
XYZ Create

Reply 5 weeks ago

Thanks!

1
Soose
Soose

6 weeks ago on Step 15

This is a great idea and I wanted to thank you for sharing it. The inside of the container can be used for storage of sanding supplies between uses. Now that you've used yours awhile, would you build it bigger?

0
XYZ Create
XYZ Create

Reply 5 weeks ago

Thanks for checking out my instructable! There have only been a handful of times where I would have like a larger one, I managed just fine with this one, but a bigger one would have been nice. That being said I like the smaller size as it's very portable and stores away almost anywhere.

0
LisaW260
LisaW260

2 months ago

This is most helpful! I'm assuming one can scale it up for sanding slightly larger items with a larger container, which is cool. Thank you for sharing!

0
Zaacharia
Zaacharia

1 year ago

This idea is so cool! It can also be used as a vacuum for making molds - just put the object you want molded on the surface, turn it on, and then place the flexible mold material over the object.

0
XYZ Create
XYZ Create

Reply 1 year ago

This would totally work as a vacuum former. In fact, I am planning on making a video/instructable about making a frame to hold the plastic sheet in the near future.

3
diamondemb
diamondemb

1 year ago

I love this idea!
I will definitely make one of these.
Maybe add a piece of 1/4 inch plywood to the inside of the box where the vacuum hose enters to stiffen it up some and make it more durable.

0
XYZ Create
XYZ Create

Reply 1 year ago

Thank you so much! That plywood idea is fantastic, I'll definitely give it a try!

0
diamondemb
diamondemb

Reply 1 year ago

I would be honored for you to share it. No need to credit me.
I've used this several times now and it works great. When it cold outside and I have to sand in my garage this definitely helps. Thanks again.

0
XYZ Create
XYZ Create

Reply 1 year ago

Thank you so much! It really means the world to me that you are finding this project useful.

2
bigbigdave
bigbigdave

1 year ago

This is one of those projects that is both:
A. So obvious that I'm stunned I've never seen it before, and
B. Really brilliant!
Nice job! Great instructable! I gotta go steal a storage bin from my wife...

0
XYZ Create
XYZ Create

Reply 1 year ago

Thank you so much! I really appreciate it!

0
danzo321
danzo321

1 year ago

At 5:54 we see the flange almost yank out from the silicone holding it to the plastic tub. Thought the hose clamp would hold something more substantial to keep flange in place! And, we don't make our own plywood! We actually buy it the thickness we want! Still, you've got a very effective dust collector there. Maybe there could be a (wooden?) support structure inside the plastic bin so heavy projects could safely rest on it.

0
XYZ Create
XYZ Create

Reply 1 year ago

Totally agree on buying the right plywood! I just had a ton of these small 1/8th in scraps that I needed to get rid of. The box can support a surprising amount of weight on it's own, but a support structure would be useful for really heavy objects.

0
danzo321
danzo321

Reply 1 year ago

Tell us about that air hose flange, was it pulling loose?

0
Dellazene
Dellazene

Reply 1 year ago

How is plywood made?