Extreme Backyard Zipline

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Introduction: Extreme Backyard Zipline

These are the steps I used to build my zipline that is over 100 feet long! There are many kits available for purchase, but I found that my materials were much higher quality and came out to be even cheaper than the alternatives. This instrustable is extremely customization to your situation, so get building!

Tools and Materials:

⅜” cable, 100 feet (or length of Zipline)
15 feet of standard watering hose 25 feet of ½ in shock cord 4 ⅜” clamps 6’ section of 2x4 4 4.5” eye bolts with corresponding washers and nuts Zip line trolley 20 feet of 1.5in braided rope Platform to be raised 15 feet off the ground (I used a hunting treestand)

These are the standard materials I used to create the project. I used an old treestand to create a platform, but you can use anything that can be 15 feet HIGHER than the end of your zipline. Other options might include a treehouse, a simple ladder, or even a branch of a tree that you are able to climb up to.

Two wrenches (or anything to tighten your nuts & bolts: I used an impact and a crescent wrench)
Utility knife

come along

cable grip

Supplies

Tools and Materials:

⅜” cable, 100 feet (or length of Zipline) 15 feet of standard watering hose 25 feet of ½ in shock cord 4 ⅜” clamps 6’ section of 2x4 4 4.5” eye bolts with corresponding washers and nuts Zip line trolley 20 feet of 1.5in braided rope Platform to be raised 15 feet off the ground (I used a hunting treestand) These are the standard materials I used to create the project. I used an old treestand to create a platform, but you can use anything that can be 15 feet HIGHER than the end of your zipline. Other options might include a treehouse, a simple ladder, or even a branch of a tree that you are able to climb up to.

Two wrenches (or anything to tighten your nuts & bolts: I used an impact and a crescent wrench)

Utility knife

come along

cable grip

Step 1: Assemble Your Raised Platform

This will be the high end of your zipline that must be 15 feet off the ground. I used an extra tree stand I had laying around, but you can build one with whatever scrap material you have. It can be as simple as you would like, but remember, people need to safely climb up and be comfortable at the top.

Step 2: Attach Your Cable

Next, you will need to cut your cable to length, and fasten it around your trees. Be sure to leave plenty of excess cable to allow for some sag in the zipline.

In order to not harm the trees, I cut two pieces of old yard hose and threaded by cable through the hose so that it would not dig in to the tree. I then used two cable clamps on each side of the zipline to secure the loops around the trees. Initially I left plenty of slack, we are going to tighten the zipline in the next step!

Step 3: Tighten the Cable

This is what took the most time for me, but hopefully you have better luck!

Start by creating a loop with the extra cable you have and securing your come along to it.

Then use use your cable grip on the opposite end of your come along to complete the system.

I had to use the come along to tighten the cable because it was simply too heavy to hold by hand. However, I found that allowing a fair amount of slack and increasing your slope provides the safest (and fun!) ride.

Step 4: Creating the Brake

This step is necessary so that you don't go barreling into the tree on the far end!

This can be done many ways, but I used two ~8" pieces of 2x4.

Start by screwing them together and drill a 5/8" hole in the middle of them. Then disassemble, and reattach around the cable, this time using the 4 eye bolts with washers and nuts. I found it best for the brake to be about 40 feet from the end of the zipline, but your distance may change based on your total length. Then I created a loop in both ends of 1/2" shock chord/ bungee chord and attached one side to the front two hooks on the wooden brake. The other end can be attached around a nearby tree.

Step 5: (Optional) Creating Your Swing

This step is completely optional as you may choose to simply buy a handle made for ziplines.

However, as the starting position of my zipline is over 15 feet off the ground, I wanted to have an option for small kids, or people who could not hold their weight for the duration of the zipline.

I simply cut a 2 x 6 about 24" long and drilled a hole big enough enough for the rope to sit through, and tied a knot in the rope to hold the board in place. I recommend having rope that is at least as long as the height of your zipline, so that you can easily bring it back up to your starting location. Tie a loop in the top of your rope and attach it to a carabine, which will then clip in to your trolley

Step 6: Enjoy Time With Family and Friends

After your time spent building your zipline, be sure to share it with your family and friends!

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    3 Comments

    0
    kateM0388
    kateM0388

    1 year ago

    This is terrific! Can you show your platform a bit more? How did you make it?

    0
    loganfred5
    loganfred5

    Reply 1 year ago

    https://www.midwayusa.com/product/1021010118

    This should be the link to the tree stand I used for this project. It was very simple to construct using the directions it came with, but definitely took up some extra time! I was able to purchase it on clearance(I think 50% off!) from a local shop, but I think buying any type of treestand(as opposed to building a platform) is worth it because of the added comfort and security. Glad you enjoyed!

    0
    Penolopy Bulnick
    Penolopy Bulnick

    1 year ago

    Zip lines are so much fun! Thanks for sharing :)