French Cleat Glue Bottle Holder

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Introduction: French Cleat Glue Bottle Holder

About: This page is made for beginning woodworkers and people who love to watch videos about woodworking! I share with you my advice on starting a woodworking business from home and how to grow your woodworking busi…

I always seem to lose my glue bottles. I have them laying around all over my shop, so I decided to make myself a glue bottle holder for my french cleat system. Check out this video or take the steps below the video!

Supplies

  • Leftover plywood
  • Tablesaw
  • Wood Glue
  • Clamps
  • Holesaw
  • Nail gun (optional)
  • Screwdriver
  • Screws

Step 1: Cut the Plywood to Size

For this project you need some leftover plywood. You can make it to the desired size, depending on how many glue bottles you want it to hold.

Mine is approximately 30x15x15 centimeters.

Set your fence on the tablesaw. You could also use a tracksaw at this point, though the tablesaw is better to make sure every piece has the same width.

Step 2: Cutting the Rabbets

Once you got your pieces to the desired size, we set our tablesaw blade AND the fence at 1 centimeters, so we can cut the rabbets.

The rabbets make a secure and strong joint so it can hold the heavy bottles.
I didn't use it in this project, but you should use a zero clearance insert on your tablesaw to work safe.

Step 3: Glue Up the Panels

After cutting the rabbets, we look in our shop to find some wood glue ;)

Apply a royal amount of glue into the rabbets, join the parts together and add a clamp with low pressure. Check if it's square and add some more clamps. Use the nail gun to secure the joint!

Step 4: Cut the Bottom to Size

We take some scrap 1 centimeter thick plywood for the bottom. Measure the bottom and the glued up sides and take it to the tablesaw.

What I usually do is cutting the piece to rough size and sneak up the desired size by taking of bit by bit at the tablesaw.

Step 5: Drill the Holes Which Hold the Bottles

Mark where you want your holes to come which hold the glue bottles. Measure the cap of the glue bottle and find a holesaw which is a bit larger than the cap.

At the drillpress use the holesaw to cut the holes, drilling from one side, flip it over and drill all the way through from the other side to prevent tear out.

Step 6: Rout the Edges With a Rondover Bit (optional)

If you have a router table use the roundover bit on the edges of the holes. This makes it easier to put in the bottles. This step is optional!

Step 7: Glue the Bottom

Glue the bottom in place.

Step 8: Attach the Cleat

The cleat is made of a piece of scrap plywood cut at a 45 degree angle at the tablesaw. We add some glue and secure it in place with some screws. Make sure to put the cleat as high as possible.

Step 9: Finished!

The project is done! If you like this project make sure to subscribe to my YouTube channel!

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    6 Comments

    0
    GeorgianBay Scott
    GeorgianBay Scott

    1 year ago

    Very nice. I appreciate the work you put into building a simple shelf. Sometimes I think my workshop has better built storage than our kitchen. :) Guess that should be my focus for a while. I will try your idea for storing glue bottles inverted. Makes sense to me. Here is my latest shop storage / organizer for my drill press. Useful but not as fancy. https://www.instructables.com/id/Build-a-Drill-Press-Tool-Holder/

    0
    Fennah Woodworking
    Fennah Woodworking

    Reply 1 year ago

    Hi, thanks for the compliments!I'll make sure to check your project out as well!

    0
    carltonwb
    carltonwb

    1 year ago

    Built something a few years ago.
    Had one problem that caused me a lot of money to fix.
    I too stored my 4 bottles of glue like you show. Butdid not take into account that during the summer where I live (Arizona) garage temps can reach 120 F plus. The bottles blew the caps and I had glue all over my band saw and drill press.
    Now the bottles are store upright.
    Great build.

    0
    Fennah Woodworking
    Fennah Woodworking

    Reply 1 year ago

    Wow! Haven’t thought of that happening! I really should take that into consideration! Great tip! I’ll make something to prevent glue from dripping out of the holder! Thanks man!

    0
    Penolopy Bulnick
    Penolopy Bulnick

    1 year ago

    Thanks for sharing your bottle holder, you should consider entering the Woodworking Contest :)

    0
    Fennah Woodworking
    Fennah Woodworking

    Reply 1 year ago

    Thank you Penelope I just entered the contest!