Steampunk Airship Goggles

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Introduction: Steampunk Airship Goggles

By request: My take on goggles.

Often times after piloting my steam dirigible, I arrive at my destination only to find my eyelashes and eyebrows have collected a mass of gnats, fleas, and small birds. What to do? My last three windscreens have been stolen by flying glass pirates, so I decided to make two smaller windscreens and an apparatus to hold them securely to my head. ha HA! Those scoundrels will have to take my head before they they pilfer these!

These are the goggles that I set out to make when I found the Batman character that was the inspiration for my costume.

*note: anytime a say "an inch" or "half an inch" these are really just rough guesses as I didn't actually measure anything

Step 1: Ingredients

OK here's what I used, and I spent under $30:

Leather - leather coat purchased at salvation army for $9
Small buckle - from women's shoes at salvation army $3
Waxed sinew - from leather supplier $5
Metal rings - these I had lying around, I think they came from a craft store $?
Plumbing coupler - Home Depot $3
Plastic sheet - also had lying around

Tools:
Dremel with cutting wheel
Curved needle
Sewing machine
Liquid Nails Clear
Leather punch (you could actually use just a small nail or something, a leather punch just makes nicer holes)

Step 2: Lenses and Lense Holders

I started but cutting off the threads on both ends of the coupled, and grinding off the chrome from the insides. I did this just so that they would be brass on the inside, unfortunately the outside rings were not brass and therefore would always be silver no matter how much I ground them. They could be painted I suppose, but I left them silver.

I cut two circles out of a clear plastic sheet the same diameter of the inside of the outer ring. I screwed the threads back in to hold the lenses in place.

Step 3: Eye Cups

I took a piece of leather about about three inched wide and wrapped it around one of the lenses, cutting the length so that there was about a quarter inch overlap. I folded over the bottom edge around the front of the lens holders, pulled it tight then used the curved needle and sinew to stitch it together where it overlaps. Repeat for each eye. Hopefully the pictures explain this a little better.

Next I cut what was now a leather tube on an angle downwards toward the overlap. This keeps the slightly bulky overlap in the middle near the nose. I folded over the edges a wrap stitched them with the sinew and needle to put a better looking edge on them.

I cut a small strip of leather about an inch and a half long by an inch wide for the nose bridge. I actually had to cut this twice, because the first time it was to big for my face, you may have to adjust this to your own face.

I stitched this piece just above the overlap on the lenses.

Hopefully the pictures will make sense...


Step 4: Back Pad

I took a rough measurement around the back of my head from just over my ears, and cut a inch and a half strip to match the length. I folded the strip over itself twice so that it became half an inch thick but three layers. I put a thin bead of Liquid Nails between each layer and clamped it all together. I don't think it was entirely necessary, but it made the next part easier. I ran the whole thing through my sewing machine with a leather needle and denim thread using a stitch that my machine has built in that looks like a heartbeat pattern. This obviously was just an aesthetic choice.

This is the one part that I don't have many pics, but it's also probably the simplest and easiest to change pieces. You could really make this out a lot of different ways. I chose to make it thicker than the side strips to give the whole things a little more weight, both actually and visually.

Step 5: Head Band Part 2

I used the metal rings to act as a transition between the thinner adjusting and side straps, and the thicker back pad.

I cut strips of leather the the right width for the buckle ,there are five pieces total: 2 short ones that are attach the metal rings to the pad in the back, 1 longer piece to attach the metal ring on the left side to the eye cup, 1 long piece to connect buckle to right eye cup, and 1 long piece for the adjusting strap through the buckle.

Each one of these pieces is stitched with the sinew to it's appropriate place... it's hard to explain so the pictures are probably easier than words.

I cut the adjusting piece to a point at one end and used a small leather punch to make holes.

Step 6: Finished

Strap on you goggles, shout "Full Steam Ahead" and pilot your skyship to the nearest mad scientist convention!

1 Person Made This Project!

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211 Comments

0
ShantelleB
ShantelleB

4 years ago

Ha ha bunch of dumb people this is about goggles not animals so take your protest elsewhere or better yet go tout some vinyl ( plastic) argh you vegans are unnatural we are ominvores we have teeth made for eating flesh mind you i dont believe it should be nearly as much as we do !! Anyway you can use leather or straight up metal or go buy polluting synthetics

0
yallen
yallen

8 years ago on Step 6

I made a pair using milk bottle cap which I coated with copper leaf, and leather from an old pair of shoes. I just used a regular sewing needle and doubled the thread. It would help to have a thimble because it's hard to push the needle through.
You could make interchangible lenses by cutting off the top of the bottle and having different lenses in the bottle lids.

0
tRoy heRman
tRoy heRman

9 years ago on Step 2

How did you connect the ring to the leather?

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aintMichael
aintMichael

Reply 8 years ago on Introduction

Half a year later.... So , I used two smaller bits of leather, wrapped them around the ring and then sewed the, together. Hope that sort of makes sense...

0
DarynSharp
DarynSharp

8 years ago on Introduction

I love it! I really want to make a steampunk harness that you can use for airships. As you're a senior rank on the flight of steam, I just wonder if you have any suggestions for me?

I have a limited amount of money.

0
aintMichael
aintMichael

Reply 8 years ago on Introduction

To keep it on the cheap I usually forage through the Salvation Army for Most of my bits. You might be surprised at all the cool junk in the Home Decor section.

0
shawnon
shawnon

12 years ago on Step 2

I used a slip joint nut instead of a coupler. It comes with a rubber washer that fits on the inside, and I just glued the lens between the nut and washer. It looks the same, and no metal-cutting involved! _

0
tweetspie
tweetspie

Reply 9 years ago on Step 2

I'm looking at supplies online to price how much this is going to cost me. What size slip joint nut did you use? 1 1/2? 1 1/4? Bigger?

0
shawnon
shawnon

Reply 9 years ago on Step 2

I used 1 1/2" and I think they were ~$8, but that was 3 yrs ago so they might be more or less now. Here's some pics in case they help.

P1020401 sm.jpgP1020402 sm 2.jpg
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Gmechanic
Gmechanic

Reply 9 years ago on Step 2

couldn't find the exact coupler at any hardware no matter how common it would seem to be so I'm going to look for a slip joint nut or just order online if they don't have that in-store either...can't believe home depot and lowes don't have the coupler though I would think they would, but no, not even on their websites! =( Thanks for the tip!

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shawnon
shawnon

Reply 9 years ago on Step 2

I think I got it in the plumbing section... good luck!

0
Gmechanic
Gmechanic

Reply 9 years ago on Step 2

no prob, found it in the bath/household section (I was in the industrial plumbing where they keep the galvonized steels, and PVC pipes) of my store. Guys, go look in the bath section since this is not used in industrial plumbing.. -__- they even had the slip joints by themselves, but I wanted threads, so..

0
zwilcox1
zwilcox1

9 years ago on Introduction

I didn't have any coupler things, so I used the top of an old broken Maglite®, Which is nice because then the lens is already made.

0
blevine1
blevine1

9 years ago on Step 3

hey, quick question. when you stitched the overlap above the lens holders did u have the holders in when you stitched or did you take them out first.

if you had the lens holders in could you clarify how you stitched with out every thing becoming loose

0
Wildrat
Wildrat

10 years ago on Introduction

There is nothing you can wear, eat, buy, that does not kill or has been killed whether it be syntheric or otherwise.Things are here on this earth for us to use. If you don't want to use it then don't, but don't come moaning here about not wanting to use what the author used. There are so many choices for material it's pitiful. Use a synthetic that was made on a machine that a man or women got there arm cut off on in an accident, the machine that is made of steel that caused the death of men mining the ore, or in the foundry or the coal used to fire the furnace, many, many trees and plants died to make the coal, or any fuel that is used, millions of animals died so you can goto the health food store and get your tofu. So amyway, enjoy your goggles if you manage to find anything to make them with.

0
frogmeetcog
frogmeetcog

Reply 10 years ago on Introduction

Word.

You also kill millions of microrganisms each minute by breathing, if that bothers you guys...

0
Kozar
Kozar

Reply 9 years ago on Introduction

-- Kozar Exhales,

-- 12 Million Kills!

-- Achievement Unlocked!!

0
castothomas
castothomas

Reply 9 years ago on Introduction

Thats for sure, God the father gave it for us to use only thing I want to ask is where did you find the materialso I can get some myself.